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Ken
July 23rd 03, 04:42 PM
(Tom) wrote in news:ae755ef4.0307222029.9811146
@posting.google.com:
> 1. What's a recovery ride with tempo pace?
> 2. Some rides are listed as "A", "B", or "C" road. What does this
> mean?

Those terms vary depending on the club. Call the ride leader and ask what
the pace will be like and about regroups, etc. In some clubs, "A" is the
fastest speed and in others, "A" is the slowest.

> 4. When riding alone, I average 16-17 mph. What pace should I be able
> to maintain in a group?

Your pace will be about the same. Don't try drafting on your first group
ride. Most groups riding at that speed don't draft much anyway.

July 23rd 03, 04:47 PM
In article >, Tom
> wrote:

> I've avoided group rides in the past, but I'm tired of getting brushed
> off the road by cars and I figure a group should be safer. I've found
> some local rides for novice group riders, and I have some questions
> about terminology:

If you're getting brushed off the road you're not riding right. The
way riding in a group will help is that people there can tell you how
better to ride on the road. Group riding has it's own set of skills.

>
> 1. What's a recovery ride with tempo pace?

A steady ride at an easier than race pace.


>
> 2. Some rides are listed as "A", "B", or "C" road. What does this
> mean?

Levels of difficulty/speed/distance/hills

>
> 3. What's a pick-up ride?

Usually it's an informal semi-scheduled ride where the participants
decide where to go just before leaving. My old club called them show
and go rides.
>
> 4. When riding alone, I average 16-17 mph. What pace should I be able
> to maintain in a group?

Um, 16-17 mph? if you truly average 16-17 on the computer including
hills, then with most clubs you would ride at a B level with little
problem. If you cruise on the flat at 16-17 but don't usually go far
(over 30 miles) or don't usually head for the hills you would most
likely start as a C level rider. Most riders find they go a little
faster and a little farther more easily with a group.

When evaluating a group make sure you talk to someone on the phone and
discuss how they handle dropped riders. Some groups like to hammer and
it's every man for his'self. Others have strict no drop policies.
Better yet, since you're a little nervous about being out by yourself,
after talking to a club officer on the phone, head out to a start and
talk to rank and file riders to see if actions match words with regards
to dropped riders.

Most riders ride with more than one group and most groups are
ridiculously cheap on a per year basis. Once you're signed up you'll
get their ride schedules and you can pick and choose what you want to
do on any given day. Most clubs are very friendly to newcomers and
guests so get out there and try a couple.

baltobernie
July 23rd 03, 08:59 PM
Does the group have a Web site? Many do, and they answer many of your
questions, e.g.
http://www.bikepptc.org/classification.html
As you can see, the higher speed rides often include riding in a paceline.
If you don't have experience in these, let the other riders know, and they
won't give you a rash about avoiding a pull at the front.

I second Helen's comments about different club's policy on dropped riders.
Theoretically, at least the ride leader should ride the advertised pace.
Around here, it's common for group rides to go much quicker than advertised.
So you might want to be a big fish in a little pond until you get a feel for
the club.

Another caveat is the quality of the "cue sheet" for the ride. These are
often 8 x 11 sheets folded into fourths with names of roads, cumulative
miles, and miles between points. Some are abysmal, with obsolete landmarks,
etc. Another good idea for riding in a "slower" group; minimizing the
chance of getting dropped <and>lost.

I hope none of this discourages you from trying a group ride or two. They
offer a change of scenery as well as fellowship. Be ready to go at the
advertised time, and be honest about your abilities and experience. You'll
have a ball.

baltobernie

> wrote in message
...
> In article >, Tom
> > wrote:
>
> > I've avoided group rides in the past, but I'm tired of getting brushed
> > off the road by cars and I figure a group should be safer. I've found
> > some local rides for novice group riders, and I have some questions
> > about terminology:
>
> If you're getting brushed off the road you're not riding right. The
> way riding in a group will help is that people there can tell you how
> better to ride on the road. Group riding has it's own set of skills.
>
> >
> > 1. What's a recovery ride with tempo pace?
>
> A steady ride at an easier than race pace.
>
>
> >
> > 2. Some rides are listed as "A", "B", or "C" road. What does this
> > mean?
>
> Levels of difficulty/speed/distance/hills
>
> >
> > 3. What's a pick-up ride?
>
> Usually it's an informal semi-scheduled ride where the participants
> decide where to go just before leaving. My old club called them show
> and go rides.
> >
> > 4. When riding alone, I average 16-17 mph. What pace should I be able
> > to maintain in a group?
>
> Um, 16-17 mph? if you truly average 16-17 on the computer including
> hills, then with most clubs you would ride at a B level with little
> problem. If you cruise on the flat at 16-17 but don't usually go far
> (over 30 miles) or don't usually head for the hills you would most
> likely start as a C level rider. Most riders find they go a little
> faster and a little farther more easily with a group.
>
> When evaluating a group make sure you talk to someone on the phone and
> discuss how they handle dropped riders. Some groups like to hammer and
> it's every man for his'self. Others have strict no drop policies.
> Better yet, since you're a little nervous about being out by yourself,
> after talking to a club officer on the phone, head out to a start and
> talk to rank and file riders to see if actions match words with regards
> to dropped riders.
>
> Most riders ride with more than one group and most groups are
> ridiculously cheap on a per year basis. Once you're signed up you'll
> get their ride schedules and you can pick and choose what you want to
> do on any given day. Most clubs are very friendly to newcomers and
> guests so get out there and try a couple.

Karen M.
July 23rd 03, 09:27 PM
Tom asks:
....
> 1. What's a recovery ride with tempo pace?
Something easy-going, unlike the training ride that necessitates
the recovery. (Can't help on "tempo pace.)

> 2. Some rides are listed as "A", "B", or "C" road. What does this
> mean?
MPH classification. A is domestique-bringing-the-drinks pace
(17-20). B is we're almost to the restaurant pace (15-18). C is riding
to work when you don't want to go (10-12--15). Your pace may vary.

> 3. What's a pick-up ride?
One that's unscheduled or unorganized. Oh, wait, we're talking
about a bike club; of course it's unorganized. No cue sheet, no sag,
sometimes it means whoever shows up decides on the pace and
route/destination.

> 4. When riding alone, I average 16-17 mph. What pace should I be able
> to maintain in a group?
Depends on the group. Locally we have a "club" of wannabees who
typically ignore traffic signals and ride in a fairly tight pack. They
go about 18-25, depending. And there's another club that ignores
traffic signals (hey, is there a pattern here??) that gets strung out
and might top at 18.
If you're drafting or riding with folks who are nice enough to keep
the group together, you should be OK doing 18-20 most of the time.

--Karen M.
no club

Roy Zipris
July 24th 03, 01:05 AM
When you are deciding what ride to do--A, B, C, etc.--based on the
group's definition (average speed, miles, terrain) of those
categories, be aware that rides often come in faster, longer, and
hillier than advertised. This is unfair to newcomers, who may be
dropped, but it's quite typical in the clubs I ride with.

But, in turn, be fair about your abilities. Clubs around here suggest
that newcomers ride a level below what they think they can handle for
the first ride or two. It's not fun to hold a group of faster,
stronger riders up, making them wait at the top of every hill or turn.

It helps to know the ride leader's predilections, which you won't.
Some are good about keeping the pace, others not; some are good about
keeping an eye on the back of the group, others oblivious. With
less-experienced riders, these traits can significantly influence
whether you enjoy your experience with that club. But always enjoy the
ride. --Roy Zipris

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