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Brian Sanderson
July 27th 03, 07:43 AM
Good Grief!

YES! the TDF is UnAmerican...so whadayawant? A Return of the HUAC hearings?

BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey...

Mark Weaver
July 27th 03, 05:18 PM
"Brian Sanderson" > wrote in message
...
> Good Grief!
>
> YES! the TDF is UnAmerican...so whadayawant? A Return of the HUAC
hearings?
>
> BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey...
>

Debatable. And, in any case, the majority of the best Canadian hockey
players do their skating in the US now anyway.

Hunrobe
July 27th 03, 10:23 PM
>Mike Latondresse

wrote:

>You call that dull drill football...tune in to a few CFL games and see
>something exciting.

Why? Does the CFL have naked cheerleaders?

Regards,
Bob Hunt

salmoneous
July 27th 03, 11:06 PM
> The American people seem to have an outstanding ability to think
> outside the box, and willingness to colour outside the lines

Actually, most of us absolutely refuse to coloUr in any way, shape or form.

Zoot Katz
July 27th 03, 11:18 PM
27 Jul 2003 21:23:22 GMT,
>,
(Hunrobe) wrote:

>>Mike Latondresse
>
>wrote:
>
>>You call that dull drill football...tune in to a few CFL games and see
>>something exciting.
>
>Why? Does the CFL have naked cheerleaders?
>
With erect nipples.
--
zk

Mike Latondresse
July 27th 03, 11:53 PM
"Mark Weaver" > wrote in
:

>
> "Brian Sanderson" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Good Grief!
>>
>> YES! the TDF is UnAmerican...so whadayawant? A Return of the
>> HUAC
> hearings?
>>
>> BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better
>> Hockey...
>>
>
> Debatable. And, in any case, the majority of the best Canadian
> hockey players do their skating in the US now anyway.
>
>
Yeah but they become the best in Canada and any good American team is
mostly Canadians with the odd Minnesotan and Euro thrown in.

Zippy the Pinhead
July 28th 03, 01:30 AM
On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 09:56:37 -0500, "Pat" > wrote:

>>
>> BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey...
>>
>>
>
>We play better football.

I think it's time we gave Canadians some slack.

It's no wonder they get all paranoid, what with constantly having to
guard their long, vulnerable Southern border against illegal
immigrants seeking the good life, eh.

R15757
July 28th 03, 06:20 AM
<< BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey... >>


We've taken almost all your hockey clubs. On behalf of America, I just want to
say thanks eh.

Tom Keats
July 28th 03, 06:48 AM
In article >,
(R15757) writes:
> << BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey... >>
>
>
> We've taken almost all your hockey clubs. On behalf of America, I just want to
> say thanks eh.


Take 'em all.

Please.



Wanna buy a Monte Cristo?


cheers,
Tom

--
-- Powered by FreeBSD
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca

archer
July 28th 03, 01:19 PM
In article >,
says...
>
> "Pat" > wrote in message
> ...
> > x-no-archive:yes
> >
> > "Brian Sanderson" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Good Grief!
> > >
> > > YES! the TDF is UnAmerican...so whadayawant? A Return of the HUAC
> > hearings?
> > >
> > > BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey...
> > >
> > >
> >
> > We play better football.
>
> And that's why you have never ever won a world cup, or even taken part in
> many.

The women have won two.


--
David Kerber
An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good
Lord, it's morning".

Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.

Pat
July 28th 03, 04:11 PM
x-no-archive:Yes

> >
> > We play better football.


>
> And that's why you have never ever won a world cup, or even taken part in
> many.
>
BTW: how many soccer World Cups has Canada won--or even taken part in?

I'm waiting.;...

Pat in TX

Mark Weaver
July 28th 03, 06:09 PM
"archer" > wrote in message
> > > We play better football.
> >
> > And that's why you have never ever won a world cup, or even taken part
in
> > many.
>
> The women have won two.
>

And the men made the semi's last year (and should have beaten the Germans
and earned the opportunity to get stomped by Brazil in the finals). Combine
the men's and women's performance that has to make the US the overall world
champs, no?

archer
July 28th 03, 06:41 PM
In article >, [email protected]
corvusdev.com says...
>
> "archer" > wrote in message
> > > > We play better football.
> > >
> > > And that's why you have never ever won a world cup, or even taken part
> in
> > > many.
> >
> > The women have won two.
> >
>
> And the men made the semi's last year (and should have beaten the Germans
> and earned the opportunity to get stomped by Brazil in the finals).

And that's what would have happened, most likely. Just last week, the US
Mens National Team was beaten by Brazil's under-23 team in the CONCACAF
gold cup tournament. Just imagine what would have happened if they went
against Brazil's first string!


> Combine
> the men's and women's performance that has to make the US the overall world
> champs, no?

I guess so!!!! <GGGG>


--
David Kerber
An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good
Lord, it's morning".

Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.

July 28th 03, 09:39 PM
On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 10:11:13 -0500, "Pat" > wrote:

>x-no-archive:Yes
>
>> >
>> > We play better football.
>
>
>>
>> And that's why you have never ever won a world cup, or even taken part in
>> many.
>>
> BTW: how many soccer World Cups has Canada won--or even taken part in?
>
>I'm waiting.;...
>
>Pat in TX
>

I know of at least one but I but then we are only have a population
of 30 million to your roughly 300 million. Besides no self respecting
Canadian male would play the sport when he can play hockey

July 28th 03, 09:51 PM
On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 13:06:01 -0400, "Mark Weaver"
> wrote:

>
>"Mike Latondresse" > wrote in message
>> >
>> Yeah but they become the best in Canada and any good American team is
>> mostly Canadians with the odd Minnesotan and Euro thrown in.
>
>Hmmm. Funny how that they let all those Canadians and Euros play on the US
>Hockey Olympic team. Yes, I know the Canadians won the gold medal game last
>year -- but I also seem to remember something about it being the first gold
>hockey medal in 50 years or so, no?
>
If you do remember in the past our best turned pro and could never
played in the Olympics (sort of like your basketball players)
When they did allow them it was in the start of the NHL playoffs so
many of best never got to play. Look at the last two when we played
our best with little practice as team a silver which should of been
gold totally outplayed the Chez's but Hassik stoned us and the last
one we demoralized the US if it wasn't for Richter standing on his
head it would have been much higher. Oh yes didn't we win the World
the year before and the juniors.
Don't forget the great game the woman played against 7 US players
while only having 5 men on the ice.

Stergios Papadakis
July 28th 03, 10:04 PM
wrote:

> Don't forget the great game the woman played against 7 US players
> while only having 5 men on the ice.

What?

Stergios

Pat
July 29th 03, 11:19 PM
x-no-archive:yes

> >> Don't forget the great game the woman played against 7 US players
> >> while only having 5 men on the ice.
> >
> >What?
> >
> >Stergios
>
>
> The seventh was the american referee(has been banned) who called
> everything under the sun against the Canadian team who played short
> handed most of the game
> so that's 7 against 5

So, the Canadian women's team has men on it? Is that what you're saying?
Who was this referee, btw?

Pat in TX

S. Anderson
July 29th 03, 11:52 PM
"Brian Sanderson" > wrote in message
...
> Good Grief!
>
> YES! the TDF is UnAmerican...so whadayawant? A Return of the HUAC
hearings?
>
> BTW, most Canadians are UnAmerican too, and we play better Hockey...
>
>

Speaking as a Canadian, I think it's UnCanadian to brag...

Cheers,

Scott..

Zoot Katz
July 30th 03, 01:26 AM
Wed, 30 Jul 2003 00:17:18 GMT,
>,
wrote:

>Sorry don't know the woman's name

Stacey (maybe she was having a bad day) Livingston

15:52 in power plays for the US vs. 6:00 for Team Canada.

AFAICT, the IIHF never reprimanded her for the atrocity but instead
made up excuses for the obviously biased officiating.
--
zk

Zoot Katz
July 30th 03, 01:27 AM
Wed, 30 Jul 2003 00:18:03 GMT,
>,
wrote:

>
>>Speaking as a Canadian, I think it's UnCanadian to brag...
>>
>>Cheers,
>>
>>Scott..
>>
>Maybe it's about time

shhh, world domination 2012!
Pass it on.
--
zk

S. Anderson
July 30th 03, 02:01 AM
"Zoot Katz" > wrote in message
...
> Wed, 30 Jul 2003 00:18:03 GMT,
>
> shhh, world domination 2012!
> Pass it on.
> --
> zk

Heehee..Candian Bacon!! It's true!! It's all true!! I knew it!!! ;-)
Let's burn the White House again!!

Cheers,

Scott..

Mike Latondresse
July 30th 03, 04:12 AM
"Mark Weaver" > wrote in
:

>
> Right--all of us Americans came from somewhere else at some point.
> Where do you think most of the current pro hockey players' kids
> are born and grow up?

Lotsa places but doesn't make them US citizens.

> No problem if you want to keep the jr
> leagues north of the border (though, of course, many NHL players
> now come through the US college ranks). We've got both kinds of
> NHL feeder programs in town here -- the University of Michigan
> team plays at Yost and the US National Under-18 team is at the Ann
> Arbor Ice Cube. Lots of NHL players come out of both programs.

Michigan plays fair hockey, about as good as good Canadian University
stuff, but that and Boston is about as good as it gets and generally
the whole program from coaches to scouting are Canadians. Jr of course
is where its at if you want to develop hockey players and where most
come from.

>
> It's inexorable--hockey is a world sport, and a nation of 25M
> isn't going to dominate long-term any more than the UK dominates
> world soccer just because the sport started there.

30M I'll have you know but the string is going to last a long time
mainly because in the winter everywhere is a rink here and you don't
have to try and squeeze all your practice time into a couple of hours
in an arena.
>
>
> Even so, the US managed to win a couple of golds along the way
> under the same constraints, no?
>
Sure, mostly during the time you couldn't get anyone who could play
decent hockey here to go to the olympics as no one cared...although I
must admit I did enjoy Lake Placid.

Zoot Katz
July 30th 03, 04:45 AM
Wed, 30 Jul 2003 03:12:12 GMT, >,
Mike Latondresse > wrote:

>30M I'll have you know but the string is going to last a long time
>mainly because in the winter everywhere is a rink here

In summer, they're playing hockey in the streets, school yards and
parks. On skates and/or in shoes.

And if your sister's any good, she can play too!
--
zk

Pat
July 30th 03, 03:45 PM
x-no-archive:yes


> > Right--all of us Americans came from somewhere else at some point.
> > Where do you think most of the current pro hockey players' kids
> > are born and grow up?

"Mark Weaver"


>
> Lotsa places but doesn't make them US citizens.

"Mike Latondresse"


Well, you're wrong, Mike. If a person is born in the USA that makes him a
citizen. It's one of those quirks of our constitution. That's why so many
Mexicans, Guatamalans, etc. keep flooding over our borders---get the baby
born here and he's automatically a citizen.


Pat in TX

Mike Latondresse
July 30th 03, 04:41 PM
"Pat" > wrote in
:

> x-no-archive:yes
>
>
>> > Right--all of us Americans came from somewhere else at some
>> > point.
>> > Where do you think most of the current pro hockey players'
>> > kids
>> > are born and grow up?
>
> "Mark Weaver"
>
>
>>
>> Lotsa places but doesn't make them US citizens.
>
> "Mike Latondresse"
>
>
> Well, you're wrong, Mike. If a person is born in the USA that
> makes him a citizen. It's one of those quirks of our
> constitution. That's why so many Mexicans, Guatamalans, etc. keep
> flooding over our borders---get the baby born here and he's
> automatically a citizen.
>
>
> Pat in TX
>
Gee thats interesting because my brother Peter was born in Seattle when
our mom went down to visit our dad who was seconded to Boeing during
WWII and gave birth 3 weeks prematurely. He will be interested to know
he is American.

Mark Weaver
July 30th 03, 10:36 PM
"Mike Latondresse" > wrote in message
> >
> Gee thats interesting because my brother Peter was born in Seattle when
> our mom went down to visit our dad who was seconded to Boeing during
> WWII and gave birth 3 weeks prematurely. He will be interested to know
> he is American.
>

It's kind of weird--as far as the US is concerned, in theory, you can have
dual citizenship only until you're 18, and then if you decide to become a US
citizen you are obliged to renounce your other citizenship. However, some
foreign countries won't honor such renunciations (don't know about Canada),
so as far as they're concerned their citizens remain citizens even after
they've become naturalized Americans.

But it's true, if you're born here, the US considers you a citizen until you
decide otherwise.

Mark

Mark Weaver
July 30th 03, 10:52 PM
"Mike Latondresse" > wrote in message
...
> "Mark Weaver" > wrote in
> :
>
> >
> > Right--all of us Americans came from somewhere else at some point.
> > Where do you think most of the current pro hockey players' kids
> > are born and grow up?
>
> Lotsa places but doesn't make them US citizens.
>

Well, actually, it does--at least until they decide otherwise. If they're
born here, they're automatically citizens. And, of course, more than a few
who are born here, and go to school here, and grow up here will decide to
stay (Brett Hull, for example).

> > No problem if you want to keep the jr
> > leagues north of the border (though, of course, many NHL players
> > now come through the US college ranks). We've got both kinds of
> > NHL feeder programs in town here -- the University of Michigan
> > team plays at Yost and the US National Under-18 team is at the Ann
> > Arbor Ice Cube. Lots of NHL players come out of both programs.
>
> Michigan plays fair hockey, about as good as good Canadian University
> stuff, but that and Boston is about as good as it gets and generally
> the whole program from coaches to scouting are Canadians. Jr of course
> is where its at if you want to develop hockey players and where most
> come from.
>

Nah, there are a whole mess of good college programs that aren't Michigan or
Boston -- Colorado College, Maine, Minnesota, Ohio State, Michigan State,
North Dakota...hell, even Nebraska-Omaha.

> >
> > It's inexorable--hockey is a world sport, and a nation of 25M
> > isn't going to dominate long-term any more than the UK dominates
> > world soccer just because the sport started there.
>
> 30M I'll have you know but the string is going to last a long time
> mainly because in the winter everywhere is a rink here and you don't
> have to try and squeeze all your practice time into a couple of hours
> in an arena.
> >

Pffft. Where the people actually live in Canada, the winters are about the
same as in the northern US. But in any case, none of the serious little kid
hockey players around here play on outdoor rinks--they play indoors and
there are leagues going pretty much all year except during the summer.
These kids aren't getting any shortage of hockey.

Mark

July 30th 03, 11:52 PM
On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 17:52:17 -0400, "Mark Weaver"
> wrote:

>
>"Mike Latondresse" > wrote in message
...
>> "Mark Weaver" > wrote in
>> :
>>
>
>Well, actually, it does--at least until they decide otherwise. If they're
>born here, they're automatically citizens. And, of course, more than a few
>who are born here, and go to school here, and grow up here will decide to
>stay (Brett Hull, for example).
>
>> >

Brett Hull is a traitor

Mike Latondresse
July 31st 03, 12:11 AM
"Mark Weaver" > wrote in
:

>
> Nah, there are a whole mess of good college programs that aren't
> Michigan or Boston -- Colorado College, Maine, Minnesota, Ohio
> State, Michigan State, North Dakota...hell, even Nebraska-Omaha.
>
Maybe your standards are too low. Most Canadians who go to play hockey
at US universities do so because they get full scholarships not because
the hockey is good. My cousins son just graduated from Brown where he
was allstar defenseman. He said that if he wanted to go on in hockey he
would have had to stay here in Junior.

>
> Pffft. Where the people actually live in Canada, the winters are
> about the same as in the northern US. But in any case, none of
> the serious little kid hockey players around here play on outdoor
> rinks--they play indoors and there are leagues going pretty much
> all year except during the summer. These kids aren't getting any
> shortage of hockey.
>
> Mark
>
You better check your geography...how far is Edmonton for example from
the US border again? The serious little kids here play in arenas and
then when they are finished that go out and play on the local outdoor
rink, thats why they are so damn good.

Mike Latondresse
July 31st 03, 04:14 AM
"Pat" > wrote in
:

> Craig--Hopefully, we can start turning Texas kids into NHL
> players. Or at least try to use the sport to get an education.
> That's where I am with my kids. They are going to stay here and
> play for another year, then they'll decide what school they want
> to go to. If they can get drafted, that's great, but we want them
> to get a good education."
>
> So, this then is the difference: in the Canadian system, the kids'
> post-secondary education is given short shrift. Parents such as
> the Ludwigs want their boys to get a college degree. That's the
> future of hockey, right there.
>
> Pat in TX (where else?)
>
So what is this about hockey or school...lots of hockey in Canadian
universities with no basket weaving or communications degrees too.

Stephen Gallagher
July 31st 03, 02:06 PM
> > Gee thats interesting because my brother Peter was born in Seattle when
> > our mom went down to visit our dad who was seconded to Boeing during
> > WWII and gave birth 3 weeks prematurely. He will be interested to know
> > he is American.
> >
>
> It's kind of weird--as far as the US is concerned, in theory, you can have
> dual citizenship only until you're 18, and then if you decide to become a US
> citizen you are obliged to renounce your other citizenship.

That's actually a widespread urban legend. The US has no
requirement for a person with dual citizenship to choose
only one citizenship when he reaches a certain age. Some
other countries do, but the US does not.

Here is the US State Department's website which specifically
states that US law does not require a person to choose
one citizenship or another (2nd paragraph, 2nd sentence).

At one time, the US had a requirement that a child born
abroad and who received dual citizenship, had to return
to the US by a certain age, if he wished to keep his
US citizenship, but that no longer applies either.

> However, some
> foreign countries won't honor such renunciations (don't know about Canada),

Since it's not required, it's not an issue. If it were required,
then Canada would only honour it, if it were a renunciation
made before Canadian officials and registered with the
government of Canada. A renunciation made before non-Canadian
officials would have no effect under Canadian law.

> so as far as they're concerned their citizens remain citizens even after
> they've become naturalized Americans.

Very true.

>
> But it's true, if you're born here, the US considers you a citizen until you
> decide otherwise.

Also true. The exception being for persons born in the US
to foreign diplomats. They are not considered to be
US citizens, but everyone else is.

Stephen Gallagher

Mike Latondresse
July 31st 03, 05:03 PM
(Stephen Gallagher) wrote in
om:


> However, if he did choose to acknowledge
> it, he may find that he opens a big can of worms,
> depending on his financial situation and how he has
> set up his investments.
>
I can assure you he has no interest in doing that...in fact I will e-
mail him and tell him just to **** him off.

Pat
July 31st 03, 11:19 PM
x-no-archive:yes

> >
> > So, this then is the difference: in the Canadian system, the kids'
> > post-secondary education is given short shrift. Parents such as
> > the Ludwigs want their boys to get a college degree. That's the
> > future of hockey, right there.
> >
> > Pat in TX (where else?)
> >
> So what is this about hockey or school...lots of hockey in Canadian
> universities with no basket weaving or communications degrees too.

What I was referring to was the Canadian "junior leagues" set ups where the
young men do not get an advanced education. If I understand it correctly,
they are more or less apprenticed to hockey starting in their early teen
years. Ludwig thinks his sons would be better off with a university
education or else he would put them in "juniors" too. I think that in the
21st Century, more and more parents would agree that a university education
would be a terrific fall-back position than just playing in junior leagues.

Pat in TX

August 1st 03, 12:46 AM
On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 17:19:14 -0500, "Pat" > wrote:

>x-no-archive:yes
>
>> >
>> So what is this about hockey or school...lots of hockey in Canadian
>> universities with no basket weaving or communications degrees too.
>
>What I was referring to was the Canadian "junior leagues" set ups where the
>young men do not get an advanced education. If I understand it correctly,
>they are more or less apprenticed to hockey starting in their early teen
>years. Ludwig thinks his sons would be better off with a university
>education or else he would put them in "juniors" too. I think that in the
>21st Century, more and more parents would agree that a university education
>would be a terrific fall-back position than just playing in junior leagues.
>
>Pat in TX
>
You have a misconceived notion about the junior leagues in Canada. The
max age is 20 ??? not sure but close. All juniors hockey player in
Ontario are required to attend secondary schools and if needed are
tutored.
The fact is by the time a kid is 18 he knows if he's NHL
material so this lack of advanced education is moot. Those who take
the scholarship route in the US are highly unlikely to make to the
NHL as there hockey skills are usually not good enough to make the
NHL or are so low in the draft that no team will sign. Evidence is
just look at NHL draft and the ages of the kids drafted. BTW Junior
hockey is way more entertaining than US college hockey.
About advanced US education how was it that Dexter Manly
managed to get a degree without being able to read and write.
Lets face it US athletic scholarships are nothing more than factory
mills for the pro teams.
Why are Canadians so good at hockey PASSION it's our nation sport
and we take pride in it. We will never give up if down 10-3 we will
skate our hardest right to the end.

S. Anderson
August 1st 03, 03:37 AM
> wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 17:19:14 -0500, "Pat" > wrote:
>
> You have a misconceived notion about the junior leagues in Canada. The
> max age is 20 ??? not sure but close. All juniors hockey player in
> Ontario are required to attend secondary schools and if needed are
> tutored.

With few exceptions, kids on the road to/in CHL, OHL and QMJHL are poorly
schooled. I've got a few of them in my family! When you're doing hockey 6
nights a week there isn't much room for school. And unfortunately, many
parents condone this behaviour..they always think "He'll only be 20..he can
go back to school.." and maybe some of them do. But most don't I suspect.
They think this is their kid's shot..he's so close. I'm not telling, I'm
just saying. Craig Ludwig is smart enough to understand the odds. Even in
the OHL, one of the more popular sources for NHL players, it's probable only
1 player on a team in a given year will play any significant time in the
NHL. The Canaidan junior leagues are a more sure-fire way to get to the NHL
than American collegiate hockey at this time, but knowing the odds, and
knowing that US collegiate hockey is good enough to produce NHL players
(Paul Kariya, Mike Komisarek, Ron Hainsey, Jay Pandolfo, Brian Rafalski),
I'd certainly push my kids into a US college if I had the opportunity.

OTOH, what's wrong with being an electrician? If the kid loves hockey, and
wants to play the best junior hockey (which is Canadian junior..), maybe
that's not such a bad thing. Not everyone desires to go to college and
become a bean counter.

Cheers,

Scott..

Pat
August 1st 03, 03:03 PM
x-no-archive:yes

> >
> You have a misconceived notion about the junior leagues in Canada. The
> max age is 20 ??? not sure but close. All juniors hockey player in
> Ontario are required to attend secondary schools and if needed are
> tutored.
> The fact is by the time a kid is 18 he knows if he's NHL
> material so this lack of advanced education is moot. Those who take
> the scholarship route in the US are highly unlikely to make to the
> NHL as there hockey skills are usually not good enough to make the
> NHL or are so low in the draft that no team will sign. Evidence is
> just look at NHL draft and the ages of the kids drafted. BTW Junior
> hockey is way more entertaining than US college hockey.
> About advanced US education how was it that Dexter Manly
> managed to get a degree without being able to read and write.
> Lets face it US athletic scholarships are nothing more than factory
> mills for the pro teams.
> Why are Canadians so good at hockey PASSION it's our nation sport
> and we take pride in it. We will never give up if down 10-3 we will
> skate our hardest right to the end.

Well, then, how do you explain the parents' wish to make sure their boys
have a college education? How do you explain the drafting of players from
college every single year? Surely the pro scouts know more about it than
you do...

Also, that bull about Dexter Manly was just that--bull! I talked to a guy
who attended elementary school with Dexter and he said that Dexter
absolutely know how to read and write in elementary school but that he was
"playing" the news media and everybody else with his claims so as to seem
sympathetic. You should realize that you've been taken for a ride.

And, if you have proof that "US athletic scholarships are nothing more than
factory mills for the pro teams" then by all means you should go to the
proper authorities and enlighten them so the entire mess could be
straightened up. Oh, no evidence? Just your pro-Canadian bias? How
shocking!

Pat in TX

archer
August 1st 03, 05:52 PM
In article >,
says...
> "Pat" > wrote in
> :
>
> >
> > Well, then, how do you explain the parents' wish to make sure
> > their boys have a college education? How do you explain the
> > drafting of players from college every single year? Surely the
> > pro scouts know more about it than you do...
>
> They draft hundreds of players every year including Euro juniors so
> they also throw in a handful of US college player, no big deal.
>
> Dexter who?
> >
> > And, if you have proof that "US athletic scholarships are nothing
> > more than factory mills for the pro teams" then by all means you
> > should go to the proper authorities and enlighten them so the
> > entire mess could be straightened up.
> >
> Yeah and why would someone want to straighten it out? Scholarships
> are for football and basketball, hockey, played at a couple of dozen
> colleges is a no show sport.

Schools have scholarships for a lot more than just football and
basketball. People also get them for fencing, track, soccer, swimming
and other "minor" sports. It all depends on what the college feels is
important in their sports programs.


--
David Kerber
An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good
Lord, it's morning".

Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.

Stephen Gallagher
August 2nd 03, 12:14 PM
(snip)
> U.S also lets adults acquire
> a second citizenship without loosing US citizenship now, too,
> something it didn't allow 10-15 years ago.

That's right. (I'm from the US, and I moved to
Canada in 1996. In 2000, I acquired Canadian citizenship,
so now I hold both citizenships). Prior to the early
1990s, the US would have given me much more of an
argument to prove that I did not intend to give up
my US citizenship when I became a Canadian,
and prior to the late 1960s the US would have simply
revoked my US citizenship upon voluntarily acquiring
another citizenship.

>
> >At one time, the US had a requirement that a child born
> >abroad and who received dual citizenship, had to return
> >to the US by a certain age, if he wished to keep his
> >US citizenship, but that no longer applies either.
>
> Oh, it is much more complicated than than that. There are
> very different rules for children born abroad, depending on
> the year they were born, depending whether one or both
> parents are american, whether the parent is us born, or
> narutalized...

The rules you're referring to are whether a
non-US born child (with US parentage) will
receive US citizenship by descent. They are
very complicated, and do depend on the year
of birth, whether the parents are married,
whether one or both parents are US citizens, etc.

But, I was referring to the fact that in the first
half of the twentieth century, if a child was
born outside the US and if he did receive US
citizenship through his US parent(s), then he
was absolutely required to return to the US
to live for a period of time as an adult, if
he wanted to keep his US citizenship. If he failed
to meet this requirement, his US citizenship was
lost. This requirement to move back to the US,
no longer applies.

>
> Did you know that someone born outside of the US, never living
> in the US but is a US citizen because of parents, is required
> to file US income tax as well as their canadian income tax?

Yes. The US does follow a policy of taxation of
income based on citizenship. This is very unusual
since the international norm is to apply taxation
based on either residency or on source of income.

So, while a Canadian (or Irish, or Australian) citizen's
worldwide income would only be subject to income tax
in his country of citizenship if he were a resident there
(or if it was generated there), a US citizen's worldwide
income is always subject to US taxation, even if he does
not live in the US and even if the income was not earned
in the US. There are ways to exempt some foreign earned
income from US tax when the US citizen does live outside
the US, and credits to prevent double taxation, but a
timely US tax return must be filed to use this credit/exemption,
even if no US taxes are due. In nearly every other country,
once you become a non-resident, you don't have to report
your worldwide income or pay any tax to them, except on
income earned inside that country.

Stephen Gallagher

**
In your last response above, you presumably said
"Canadian" income tax because you were thinking of
such a person being a resident of Canada......
Obviously, a US citizen would only file a Canadian
return if he "lived" in Canada (likewise he would
follow British filing requirements if he lived in
Britain, Australian if in Australia, etc).

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