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Chris Neary
August 2nd 03, 07:14 AM
>- Are they overpriced? I hate to get caught up in a bidding competition.

>- On the other hand, I've seen some great bikes go for relatively low
>prices.


I've never bought a bike, but I have bought other stuff.

I think you're on to a key point: research what stuff is going for, decide
if that seems a fair price, and then stick to that price range in your
bidding.

If the bidding goes higher than your price, move on to the next auction.
Odds are you will eventually win one.


Chris Neary


"Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh

Mike Jacoubowsky
August 2nd 03, 07:50 AM
If you're not buying your first road bike, and have the fit all figured out,
eBay could be a decent way to snag a bike. However, I've seen a lot of
bikes on eBay go for a lot more than they're worth, including at least one
bike from a good customer of ours that had been pretty much ridden into the
ground and yet fetched quite a bit of money.

Fit is key. If you can find a good shop that pays a lot of attention to
getting you properly fit, that may very well be a worthwhile expense, and
something you should factor into the price. You also have the benefit of a
local place that maintains a sense of ownership in your bike, in the event
that something isn't quite right. But if you've already had road bikes,
know what fits you and have no issues working on your own bike, then you
just may find that perfect bike out there being discarded by someone who
didn't really have the bike bug.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"Jeff Sutton" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm in the market for a road bike, but I don't really want to spring for
the
> full-price, shop-floor model. I never buy a new car, and for the same
> reasons don't really want to buy a new bike.
>
> What are the ups and downs of buying a bike on EBAY? Things that worry me:
>
> - Are they overpriced? I hate to get caught up in a bidding competition.
>
> - Do you worry about perhaps buying a stolen bike?
>
> - I always figured the really good deals would be bought up by locals who
> could actually examine the bike.
>
> - My main problem with EBAY is a variation of Groucho's complaint: "If I
> win the bid, it's probably not a good deal"
>
> - On the other hand, I've seen some great bikes go for relatively low
> prices.
>
> Any comments? Experiences of those who purchased a bike on EBAY?
>
>
> Thanks!
>
>

Fred
August 2nd 03, 02:05 PM
"Mike Jacoubowsky" > wrote in message
.com...
> If you're not buying your first road bike, and have the fit all figured
out,
> eBay could be a decent way to snag a bike. However, I've seen a lot of
> bikes on eBay go for a lot more than they're worth, including at least one
> bike from a good customer of ours that had been pretty much ridden into
the
> ground and yet fetched quite a bit of money.
>
> Fit is key. If you can find a good shop that pays a lot of attention to
> getting you properly fit, that may very well be a worthwhile expense, and
> something you should factor into the price. You also have the benefit of
a
> local place that maintains a sense of ownership in your bike, in the event
> that something isn't quite right. But if you've already had road bikes,
> know what fits you and have no issues working on your own bike, then you
> just may find that perfect bike out there being discarded by someone who
> didn't really have the bike bug.
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
> http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
>
I disagree that prices on Ebay are high. At the moment they are quite low.
I do agree that it makes sense to buy a first bike, at least, from a dealer
who can fit you and match the equipment to your needs. If you know what you
need and what fits then there are some incredible bargains on Ebay.

Fred
Knife Outlet
http://www.knifeoutlet.com

Robin
August 2nd 03, 02:54 PM
Jeff Sutton wrote:
> I'm in the market for a road bike, but I don't really want to spring
> for the full-price, shop-floor model. I never buy a new car, and for
> the same reasons don't really want to buy a new bike.
>
> What are the ups and downs of buying a bike on EBAY? Things that
> worry me:
>
> - Are they overpriced? I hate to get caught up in a bidding
> competition.
>
> - Do you worry about perhaps buying a stolen bike?
>
> - I always figured the really good deals would be bought up by locals
> who could actually examine the bike.
>
> - My main problem with EBAY is a variation of Groucho's complaint:
> "If I win the bid, it's probably not a good deal"
>
> - On the other hand, I've seen some great bikes go for relatively low
> prices.
>
> Any comments? Experiences of those who purchased a bike on EBAY?
>
>
> Thanks!

Try looking for discounts on last years models etc. That way you can get a
good bike and be fitted.

Robin

Tom S
August 2nd 03, 05:37 PM
The '03 model year is over and several local shops have '03s they want to
move to get ready for the '04 models. I wouldn't be surprised if some of
your LBS were doing the same thing. Also, take a look at used bikes in the
shops; my LBS found me a great deal on a basically new (but used pricing)
Trek 2300. I'm happy, the seller was happy, the shop was happy.

--
Tom Scanlin

John
August 2nd 03, 07:45 PM
I recently bought a Trek 2200 off Ebay. The bike was brand new.
Things you need to know:

Make sure of the model you want to buy and that you are comfortable
with the fit (this will require you go to a LBS.)

Make sure you know what condition you are getting the bike in. What
assembly is required? Has the bike already been set up and adjusted
(shifting, brakes, etc.)

What are the return policies?

The bike I bought was fine except it required more assembly than the
seller indicated. The shifting points had not been adjusted. There
was some lubrication that was not done which resulted in an awful
creaking. No manuals were included with the bike.

The bike had about a $200 discount off retail. However, I had to take
it to a LBS for setup and this added around $50. Unless you are
getting a VERY deep discount the advantages of buying at the LBS
outweigh the uncertainties of buying off the internet.


"Jeff Sutton" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I'm in the market for a road bike, but I don't really want to spring for the
> full-price, shop-floor model. I never buy a new car, and for the same
> reasons don't really want to buy a new bike.
>
> What are the ups and downs of buying a bike on EBAY? Things that worry me:
>
> - Are they overpriced? I hate to get caught up in a bidding competition.
>
> - Do you worry about perhaps buying a stolen bike?
>
> - I always figured the really good deals would be bought up by locals who
> could actually examine the bike.
>
> - My main problem with EBAY is a variation of Groucho's complaint: "If I
> win the bid, it's probably not a good deal"
>
> - On the other hand, I've seen some great bikes go for relatively low
> prices.
>
> Any comments? Experiences of those who purchased a bike on EBAY?
>
>
> Thanks!

MikeYankee
August 2nd 03, 11:14 PM
You must trust the seller not only to describe the bike fairly and accurately
but also to pack it securely for shipment.

Case in point: Last year I bought an older racing bike in poor cosmetic
condition that I wanted only for the frame. I got it for only $30, plus $45
packing & shipping to be handled by the seller's LBS. I think all the LBS did
was give the guy a used bike box. The seller said the frame was true and
corrosion-free, which was proved to be correct, but he was downright careless
in packing it. When UPS delivered it, the fork ends were protruding through
the cardboard bike box; inside, the downtube paint was gouged by the rear
wheel's cassette. Fortunately the only damage was cosmetic and I was
repainting the frame anyway. I was very lucky the fork ends, in particular,
were not trashed. I complained to the seller, who responsibly refunded me half
of what I'd spent.

The story has a happy ending in that once I built the bike up (with wheels and
components I already had) it proved to be a joy to ride -- stiff, light, fast,
and fits me like a glove. But it could have turned out worse.

This said, I might indeed by another bike on Ebay -- if and only if a reputable
LBS packed and shipped it.



Mike Yankee

(Address is munged to thwart spammers.
To reply, delete everything after "com".)

Harris
August 3rd 03, 12:41 AM
"Jeff Sutton" wrote:

> I'm in the market for a road bike, but I don't really want to spring for
the
> full-price, shop-floor model. I never buy a new car, and for the same
> reasons don't really want to buy a new bike.
>
> What are the ups and downs of buying a bike on EBAY? Things that worry me:

It's not clear from your post how knowlegeable you are about bikes, bike
fit, and mechanics.

When buying on eBay you should must know exactly what you want, and what is
being offered. Furthermore, you should be prepared to do some work like
replacing a stem, or making various adjustments as necessary.

If the seller is knowlegeable and trustworthy (as evidenced by numerous
positive feedbacks), you MAY get a good deal. Even then, packing and
shipping costs on a complete bike can be high. And bid prices for some bikes
can get out of control.

I got a good deal on a frame on eBay, and got exactly what I bargained for.

For a complete bike (especially a used one), I think I'd like to see it in
person. The seller may not be aware of things like poorly built wheels, etc.

If you go the eBay route, ask the seller detailed questions, and check the
photos. If you have doubts, don't bid.

Buying a used bike locally might be a better choice.

Art Harris

Jkpoulos7
August 3rd 03, 01:47 AM
>Are you saying he should waste the LBS's time before buying the same bike on
>eBay?
>

I did it when I considered buying a Fuji from bikesdirect.com. Why should the
LBS charge $1400 for a bike that can be shipped to me free for $900?

John
August 3rd 03, 02:25 AM
"Harris" > wrote in message >...
> "John" wrote:
> > Make sure of the model you want to buy and that you are comfortable
> > with the fit (this will require you go to a LBS.)
>
> Are you saying he should waste the LBS's time before buying the same bike on
> eBay?
>
> Art Harris

No, obviously he should just order blindly off Ebay without taking
into account sizing, style, and manufacturing quality.

The bike will undoubtedly need accessories and regular service.
There's plenty of ways for the LBS to make back it's money for the
time "wasted" letting someone sit on a bike.

Of course if you want to buy the 1st bike you like without shopping
around, that's your perogative.

Harris
August 3rd 03, 12:39 PM
"John" wrote:
> "Harris" wrote:
> > Are you saying he should waste the LBS's time before buying the same
bike on
> > eBay?

> No, obviously he should just order blindly off Ebay without taking
> into account sizing, style, and manufacturing quality.

The reason you can SOMETIMES get lower prices on eBay and mail order is that
they don't have to provide customer service (advice, fitting, setup) or even
a showroom where you can see, touch, and ride the bike. Accepting those
services for free from a LBS, when you know you're not going to buy from
them, is kind of sleazy.

> The bike will undoubtedly need accessories and regular service.
> There's plenty of ways for the LBS to make back it's money for the
> time "wasted" letting someone sit on a bike.

The person who buys a bike on eBay is more likely to buy accessories from
Nashbar than a LBS. Of course, they may continue to waste the LBS's time by
trying on helmets, etc. and then buy via MO.

Art Harris

Slider2699
August 3rd 03, 03:16 PM
"Harris" > wrote in message
. net...
>
> "Jeff Sutton" wrote:
>
> > I'm in the market for a road bike, but I don't really want to spring for
> the
> > full-price, shop-floor model. I never buy a new car, and for the same
> > reasons don't really want to buy a new bike.
> >
> > What are the ups and downs of buying a bike on EBAY? Things that worry
me:
>
> It's not clear from your post how knowlegeable you are about bikes, bike
> fit, and mechanics.
>
> When buying on eBay you should must know exactly what you want, and what
is
> being offered. Furthermore, you should be prepared to do some work like
> replacing a stem, or making various adjustments as necessary.
>
> If the seller is knowlegeable and trustworthy (as evidenced by numerous
> positive feedbacks), you MAY get a good deal. Even then, packing and
> shipping costs on a complete bike can be high. And bid prices for some
bikes
> can get out of control.
>
> I got a good deal on a frame on eBay, and got exactly what I bargained
for.


I also bought a frame on eBay for a ridiculously low price, but I was smart
enough to know my measurements beforehand. This was my second eBay bike
purchase---I screwed up on the first one, which left me with a very
uncomfortable bike. I guess what everyone is saying is true. As long as you
know exactly what you need, eBay is a good way to go. I bought a Schwinn
Peloton frame/fork (Reynolds 853) brand new for $100. I had my LBS swap my
105 group from my other bike, and sold the old frame on eBay. I got $100 for
it, and the LBS charged me $150 for the buildup, new cables, and a new
seatpost(gave me a Ti seatpost for $40, sweet), so everything worked out. It
is imperative to know exactly what meaurements fit, though.

Pat
August 3rd 03, 08:33 PM
x-no-archive:yes

> "Jkpoulos7" wrote:
> > Why should the
> > LBS charge $1400 for a bike that can be shipped to me free for $900?

>
> In other words, if the stem, saddle, or cassette isn't right for you,
that's
> tough; replace them at your own expense. And, although the words are a
> little fuzzy, it sounds like there are fees for exchanging an ill-fitting
or
> inappropriate bike. So some folks will probably "make do" with a bike that
> isn't exactly what they wanted. The bike will sit in the garage as they
> enjoy all the money they saved.
>
> In addition, they don't say what they will do for you if spokes start
> breaking or wheels won't stay true. Or if something starts creaking, etc.
>
> Art Harris

Our local bike shop has a sign that more or less says: "if we go out of
business, how is that going to help you?" and that sums it up. They also
sell used bikes on commission as well as last season's bikes, so to me it
makes sense to patronize the LBS...I doubt if Bikes Direct is going to fix
that broken spoke for you, straighten that derailleur hanger, or loan you a
tire until the one you want comes in (both of which my LBS has done,
cheerfully!)

Pat in TX

Tom Sherman
August 3rd 03, 10:19 PM
Jkpoulos7 wrote:
>
> >Are you saying he should waste the LBS's time before buying the same bike on
> >eBay?
> >
>
> I did it when I considered buying a Fuji from bikesdirect.com. Why should the
> LBS charge $1400 for a bike that can be shipped to me free for $900?

The extra money is to make up for the time spent helping non-customers
who try out the product at the store and then buy off the Internet.

Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

Zippy the Pinhead
August 4th 03, 11:37 PM
>have been willing to be honest with the LBS and pay them for
>their time fitting you. $50 would probably be fine. Of course,
>then there's the issue of wondering if they're going to try as
>hard to fit you, if they feel less than enthusiastic because
>you're not buying from them...

One nearby LBS has a "Fit Kit" and works with several custom
framemakers. The deal is, you pay a certain amount (I think it's $25
to 50, don't remember exactly) for a Fit Kit evaluation. They will
help you order a frame or bike based on the measurements from the Fit
Kit.

If you go ahead and order the bike through the LBS, they'll knock the
price of the fitting (and a little more) off the bike and if you're
really nice they'll throw in a couple of water bottles or some
snazzier handlebar tape, selling more expensive parts for the cost of
lesser ones, etc.

It works out well for everybody, and they know that you'll come back
for parts and service and probably for a second (or third or
subsequent) bike.

And if you go ahead and order a bike from another source, nobody got
hurt -- the LBS got paid for his time and you got the real scoop on
what bike will fit you.

David Kerber
August 5th 03, 12:41 AM
In article >,
says...
> On 03 Aug 2003 00:47:52 GMT, Jkpoulos7 > wrote:
> >> Are you saying he should waste the LBS's time before buying the same
> >> bike on eBay?
> >
> > I did it when I considered buying a Fuji from bikesdirect.com. Why
> > should the
> > LBS charge $1400 for a bike that can be shipped to me free for $900?
>
> There's any number of reasons the LBS should charge more,
> although it's true that one of them is that the LBS can't
> buy the bike as cheaply and has more overhead. Other reasons
> tend to be service issues.
>
> Why should the LBS do all the labor of fitting you for free?
> Further, while they're fitting you, their overhead is still
> mounting up, and they might be so busy working with you that
> they miss a sale.
>
> If you really expected to save $500 on the bike, you should
> have been willing to be honest with the LBS and pay them for
> their time fitting you. $50 would probably be fine. Of course,
> then there's the issue of wondering if they're going to try as
> hard to fit you, if they feel less than enthusiastic because
> you're not buying from them...

When I was bike shopping between several different brands (which took 3
different shops to cover), one of the LBS' said that they would do a fit
for $50, and then credit me back for that if I bought the bike from
them. I ended up not going that route for various reasons, but it
seemed fair to me at the time.

--
Dave Kerber
Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

REAL programmers write self-modifying code.

Rick Onanian
August 5th 03, 01:55 AM
On Mon, 4 Aug 2003 19:41:57 -0400, David Kerber >
wrote:
> When I was bike shopping between several different brands (which took 3
> different shops to cover), one of the LBS' said that they would do a fit
> for $50, and then credit me back for that if I bought the bike from them.
> I ended up not going that route for various reasons, but it seemed fair
> to me at the time.

I have a similar story; one LBS would fit me for $80 using
a computerized measurement and calculation system; they sit
you on the computer and close it's extremeties on yours,
then they send the info off to the company that made the
machine, and that company sends back the data.

I thought it was a great idea, but wasn't going to spend
the $80; it certainly did make buying a bike there more
attractive, and I still think I might someday.

--
Rick Onanian

Khoomei
August 5th 03, 02:17 AM
I bought a bike on EBay which happened to be a local bike shop. The
price I bought it for was about 40% of the on floor price. It was a
new bike and nothing was wrong. I did get to just go and pick it up
and save on shipping, though I had to pay sales tax. I knew where this
place was and went into the store before auction end, so I knew
exactly what I was buying. In general I don't buy $1000 stuff on EBay.

On Sat, 2 Aug 2003 01:25:54 -0400, "Jeff Sutton" >
wrote:

>I'm in the market for a road bike, but I don't really want to spring for the
>full-price, shop-floor model. I never buy a new car, and for the same
>reasons don't really want to buy a new bike.
>
>What are the ups and downs of buying a bike on EBAY? Things that worry me:
>
>- Are they overpriced? I hate to get caught up in a bidding competition.
>
>- Do you worry about perhaps buying a stolen bike?
>
>- I always figured the really good deals would be bought up by locals who
>could actually examine the bike.
>
>- My main problem with EBAY is a variation of Groucho's complaint: "If I
>win the bid, it's probably not a good deal"
>
>- On the other hand, I've seen some great bikes go for relatively low
>prices.
>
>Any comments? Experiences of those who purchased a bike on EBAY?
>
>
>Thanks!
>

Pat
August 5th 03, 02:50 AM
x-no-archive:yes

....
>
> One nearby LBS has a "Fit Kit" and works with several custom
> framemakers. The deal is, you pay a certain amount (I think it's $25
> to 50, don't remember exactly) for a Fit Kit evaluation. They will
> help you order a frame or bike based on the measurements from the Fit
> Kit.

In Dallas, a fit with the "Fit Kit" costs $75.

Pat in TX

Jkpoulos7
August 5th 03, 09:02 PM
>If you really expected to save $500 on the bike, you should
>have been willing to be honest with the LBS and pay them for
>their time fitting you

What fitting? Pumping up tires? I rode a 56cm and a 58 to get size. Total
assistance time: 3 minutes. One shop I went to did take time to measure and
discuss things. That meant a lot to me and I was willing to buy a Jamis Quest
from them since I disliked the bianchis because of the C shifters. However they
can only blame Jamis not the net for losing a sale since there were no 2002
Quests available in my size and no idea when 03's would be in. So I went to
another shop and bought an 02 Lemond Buenos Aires for the same price the Jamis
was. I always recommend that shop and would definitely check there when buying
another bike.

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