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Jack
July 10th 03, 01:20 PM
Hi
I'm a skinny (8.5 stone = 119 pounds) 53 yr old male (just to set he scene)
My resting pulse is about 70bpm
I did some cycling exercise for 45 minuets today, (a lovely run) averaging
143 beats per minute

An hour later after I had stopped the exercise, my heart rate was still 85
bpm

Would you say this is normal?

This is the first time I've checked my heart rate an hour after the event -
I think I'll always try to do this in the future in order to get a baseline
for future monitoring.

Thanks

Pbwalther
July 10th 03, 02:32 PM
Many people have higher resting heart rates after sustained exercise. I
suppose that the body needs more blood flow to various areas to shore up the
working parts to get them ready for exercise again if need be.

Bonnell Frost
July 10th 03, 05:29 PM
From my experience, after a 140 bpm workout, I'll drop about
35 or 40 pretty quickly, in two minutes. THEN I enter a
cooldown phase, and it drops much more slowly for about an
hour. My resting is high 50's. If you are still warm, your
heart rate may stay up a bit.

David Kerber
July 10th 03, 05:35 PM
In article >, says...
> Hi
> I'm a skinny (8.5 stone = 119 pounds) 53 yr old male (just to set he scene)
> My resting pulse is about 70bpm
> I did some cycling exercise for 45 minuets today, (a lovely run) averaging
> 143 beats per minute
>
> An hour later after I had stopped the exercise, my heart rate was still 85
> bpm
>
> Would you say this is normal?
>
> This is the first time I've checked my heart rate an hour after the event -
> I think I'll always try to do this in the future in order to get a baseline
> for future monitoring.

With only those two data points, it's hard to say, but that wouldn't be
unusual for me. A good indicator of your overall conditioning is how
far it drops after 2 minutes of rest. For me, it goes from around 160
to about 120 or a little less in two minutes.

--
Dave Kerber
Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

REAL programmers write self-modifying code.

Hjalmar DuklŠt
July 11th 03, 02:02 PM
"David Kerber" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, says...
> > Hi
> > I'm a skinny (8.5 stone = 119 pounds) 53 yr old male (just to set he
scene)
> > My resting pulse is about 70bpm
> > I did some cycling exercise for 45 minuets today, (a lovely run)
averaging
> > 143 beats per minute
> >
> > An hour later after I had stopped the exercise, my heart rate was still
85
> > bpm
> >
> > Would you say this is normal?
> >
> > This is the first time I've checked my heart rate an hour after the
event -
> > I think I'll always try to do this in the future in order to get a
baseline
> > for future monitoring.
>
> With only those two data points, it's hard to say, but that wouldn't be
> unusual for me. A good indicator of your overall conditioning is how
> far it drops after 2 minutes of rest. For me, it goes from around 160
> to about 120 or a little less in two minutes.
>
I have a resting heart rate of 40 bpm. When doing intervals my heart rate
droppes from 170 to about 90 after one minute after my final interval. From
there down to normal resting heart rate it takes quite some time, probably
several hours depending of the time of the excersise.
Hjalmar

one of the six billion
July 13th 03, 06:34 AM
"Jack" > wrote in message
...
> Hi
> I'm a skinny (8.5 stone = 119 pounds) 53 yr old male (just to set he
scene)
> My resting pulse is about 70bpm
> I did some cycling exercise for 45 minuets today, (a lovely run)
averaging
> 143 beats per minute
>
> An hour later after I had stopped the exercise, my heart rate was still
85
> bpm
>
> Would you say this is normal?
>
> This is the first time I've checked my heart rate an hour after the
event -
> I think I'll always try to do this in the future in order to get a
baseline
> for future monitoring.
>
> Thanks
>

If I do a hard workout during the day, my heartrate will never get back to
my morning resting heartrate for the rest of the day.

Mark Hickey
July 13th 03, 04:21 PM
"one of the six billion" > wrote:

>If I do a hard workout during the day, my heartrate will never get back to
>my morning resting heartrate for the rest of the day.

Even if you don't do a hard workout, it's unlikely your HR will ever
get down to your true resting heart rate. It's always lowest in the
morning before you've gotten out of bed (or even rolled over to turn
off the alarm clock or annoy the wife). In my case, the difference
was around 10 bpm.

Mark Hickey
Habanero Cycles
http://www.habcycles.com
Home of the $695 ti frame

Elisa Francesca Roselli
July 15th 03, 01:35 PM
I take my baseline from before rather than after the activity, but sometimes I
leave the monitor on after the exercise to see how it evolves.

I don't get back to base until quite a while after stopping the exercise. But
another important factor to consider is eating. I generally have dinner after I
finish exercizing and the fact of _digesting_ sends my rate _way_ up. So If
you're doing the same, allow for it.

Elisa Roselli
Paris, France

Jack wrote:

> Hi
> I'm a skinny (8.5 stone = 119 pounds) 53 yr old male (just to set he scene)
> My resting pulse is about 70bpm
> I did some cycling exercise for 45 minuets today, (a lovely run) averaging
> 143 beats per minute
>
> An hour later after I had stopped the exercise, my heart rate was still 85
> bpm
>
> Would you say this is normal?
>
> This is the first time I've checked my heart rate an hour after the event -
> I think I'll always try to do this in the future in order to get a baseline
> for future monitoring.
>
> Thanks

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