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Robert Haston
October 5th 04, 02:59 AM
After having to put the old 90 Taurus wagon to sleep, I took stock of the
situation:

I only drive to work a few days a month due to raining in AM, working late,
carrying suitcase, or a broke bike. I admitted these can easily be
addressed with extra dry clothes, tires and tubes at work, extra light, bike
trailer, and keeping one of my other bikes ready to go. My wife still has
her car for all the shopping and stuff, so I can borrow it for the rare
non-commuting solo trip. It was also October 1st.

Besides, I knew that my statement about supporting our troops (like me)
means sacrifice, not stickers would be stronger if I actually dumped my car
and biked every single workday for a year or more instead of just 9 out of
10 days or so. Interesting how doing something that millions of Europeans
and Asians don't think anything of is some kind of big challenge and
statement to a Yank.

Robert Haston
Satellite Beach, FL

Tom Sherman
October 5th 04, 04:28 AM
Robert Haston wrote:

> After having to put the old 90 Taurus wagon to sleep, I took stock of the
> situation:
>
> I only drive to work a few days a month due to raining in AM, working late,
> carrying suitcase, or a broke bike. I admitted these can easily be
> addressed with extra dry clothes, tires and tubes at work, extra light, bike
> trailer, and keeping one of my other bikes ready to go. My wife still has
> her car for all the shopping and stuff, so I can borrow it for the rare
> non-commuting solo trip. It was also October 1st.
>
> Besides, I knew that my statement about supporting our troops (like me)
> means sacrifice, not stickers would be stronger if I actually dumped my car
> and biked every single workday for a year or more instead of just 9 out of
> 10 days or so. Interesting how doing something that millions of Europeans
> and Asians don't think anything of is some kind of big challenge and
> statement to a Yank.

Does the M5 Shockproof accept fenders?

--
Tom Sherman - Curmudgeon and Pedant

Paul Cassel
October 5th 04, 01:49 PM
Robert Haston wrote:

> After having to put the old 90 Taurus wagon to sleep, I took stock of the
> situation:
>
> I only drive to work a few days a month due to raining in AM, working late,
> carrying suitcase, or a broke bike. I admitted these can easily be
> addressed with extra dry clothes, tires and tubes at work, extra light, bike
> trailer, and keeping one of my other bikes ready to go. My wife still has
> her car for all the shopping and stuff, so I can borrow it for the rare
> non-commuting solo trip. It was also October 1st.
>
> Besides, I knew that my statement about supporting our troops (like me)
> means sacrifice, not stickers would be stronger if I actually dumped my car
> and biked every single workday for a year or more instead of just 9 out of
> 10 days or so. Interesting how doing something that millions of Europeans
> and Asians don't think anything of is some kind of big challenge and
> statement to a Yank.
>

Pretty easy to get sneery about how in the US folks don't do what
Europeans or Asians do, but then again, the situation's different. Where
I live, it's darn scary to ride a bicycle as the streets are barely wide
enough for the autos. Also many folks work much further from their homes
than in non-US places.

What I would like to learn is how folks in those places who commute on a
bicycle change to their work wear. I used to run to work, but had a
cooperative place which allowed me to change and shower upon arrival.
That job required a tie. Riding to work is fine if one works as a wrench
in a bike shop, but does fall apart for those of us who must wear fancy
duds on the job.

-paul

--
paul DOT cassel aT
gMail dot COM

Curtis L. Russell
October 5th 04, 03:04 PM
On Tue, 05 Oct 2004 06:49:44 -0600, Paul Cassel > wrote:

>What I would like to learn is how folks in those places who commute on a
>bicycle change to their work wear. I used to run to work, but had a
>cooperative place which allowed me to change and shower upon arrival.
>That job required a tie. Riding to work is fine if one works as a wrench
>in a bike shop, but does fall apart for those of us who must wear fancy
>duds on the job.

Not really. I've watched people walking in from parking lots sweating
from the heat. As long as you cool down and then towel off before
dressing and use fresh deoderant, you are probably less sweat covered
than someone that puts their suit on and then drives in to a large
parking lot, or walks four to six blocks from the metro stop, like
many do in DC.

The real issue is whether or not you have time to cool down after
arriving and whether or not you have a place to towel down and change.
If you can do both, you are in good shape even without the shower
facilities.

Curtis L. Russell
Odenton, MD (USA)
Just someone on two wheels...

Peter Clinch
October 5th 04, 03:25 PM
Paul Cassel wrote:

> Pretty easy to get sneery about how in the US folks don't do what
> Europeans or Asians do, but then again, the situation's different.

And there's Europe and there's Europe, in any case. In the UK, with odd
exceptional islands, you're widely regarded as a bit mad if you cycle
past traffic queues rather than sit in them. I can't really work out
why this is so, but it is so...

> What I would like to learn is how folks in those places who commute on a
> bicycle change to their work wear.

I walk to work these days as it's only 10 minutes from my door to my
desk, but I used to cycle in when I was 5-6 km away rather than 1. I
just cycled at a speed where I wasn't sweating buckets. Cycling is very
efficient, and if you don't need a shower after walking for half an hour
then if you're cycling at the same basic output you shouldn't need a
shower either, but you'll go a /lot/ further than the walk. Slow down
and the problem goes away. If you've got to cover 30 km that may not be
tenable, but typical cycle commutes where cycle commutes are the Clear
Best Answer aren't generally that long.

> cooperative place which allowed me to change and shower upon arrival.
> That job required a tie. Riding to work is fine if one works as a wrench
> in a bike shop, but does fall apart for those of us who must wear fancy
> duds on the job.

Some of the regular cycle commuters I see coming into the hospital are
working in formal suits and ties. They wear them on the bike, usually
under a light over jacket of some sort, but AFAICT they arrive at work,
lock the bike, take off their jacket (and possibly a trouser clip or
two) and start work.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

TammyM
October 5th 04, 07:18 PM
In alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent Paul Cassel > wrote:
: Pretty easy to get sneery about how in the US folks don't do what
: Europeans or Asians do, but then again, the situation's different. Where
: I live, it's darn scary to ride a bicycle as the streets are barely wide
: enough for the autos. Also many folks work much further from their homes
: than in non-US places.

: What I would like to learn is how folks in those places who commute on a
: bicycle change to their work wear. I used to run to work, but had a
: cooperative place which allowed me to change and shower upon arrival.
: That job required a tie. Riding to work is fine if one works as a wrench
: in a bike shop, but does fall apart for those of us who must wear fancy
: duds on the job.

Well the roads in Europe can be very narrow IME. I live 20miles from
work and have done the whole 40 mile/RT journey a few times, but mostly, I
do what I call a half commute: drive to the halfway point, bike the
remainder. I am blessed with a really easy commute regardless of which
plan I adopt: flat terrain, wide roads. Usually bike 4 days/week. I
clean up at work in the restroom, keep clothing in my office, makeup,
etc. I could live there if I wanted to! (sometimes seems like I do)
For me, it's not that hard, and the rewards are worth it even if it were
more difficult.

Tammy
Sacramento, California

Robert Haston
October 6th 04, 01:41 AM
I'm sure you could fit fenders on it, but since the frame and seat catches
the front spray, and my bag/headrest catches the back, I've never bothered.


"Tom Sherman" > wrote in message
...
> Robert Haston wrote:
>
>> After having to put the old 90 Taurus wagon to sleep, I took stock of the
>> situation:
>>
>> I only drive to work a few days a month due to raining in AM, working
>> late, carrying suitcase, or a broke bike. I admitted these can easily be
>> addressed with extra dry clothes, tires and tubes at work, extra light,
>> bike trailer, and keeping one of my other bikes ready to go. My wife
>> still has her car for all the shopping and stuff, so I can borrow it for
>> the rare non-commuting solo trip. It was also October 1st.
>>
>> Besides, I knew that my statement about supporting our troops (like me)
>> means sacrifice, not stickers would be stronger if I actually dumped my
>> car and biked every single workday for a year or more instead of just 9
>> out of 10 days or so. Interesting how doing something that millions of
>> Europeans and Asians don't think anything of is some kind of big
>> challenge and statement to a Yank.
>
> Does the M5 Shockproof accept fenders?
>
> --
> Tom Sherman - Curmudgeon and Pedant
>

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