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-   -   bigger lawyer lips on the way? (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=115232)

(PeteCresswell) November 4th 05 07:59 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per Bruce Gilbert:
One of my riding buddies (about 50 years of racing) had a crack up one
morning. He failed to adequately tighten the QR on his rear wheel....


My point here is that these sort of accidents can and do happen.


I've never had an accident. I'm still trying to train myself to check QR
tension before getting on the bike. I do it sometimes and when I remember that
I forgot, I stop and do it right then and there.

Having said that, one day I pulled the bike off the carrier on the back of my
car, got on it, and rode off: no check. First time I applied the front brake
it felt funny. Turned out front skewer was *really* loose - i.e. just a little
more and the wheel would have come out. As it was, the lawyer lips probably
saved me.

I'll never know why it was loose - user error the night before? - something
about vibration on the rack?....

But the reason seems moot to me. The bottom line seems to be that somebody of
reasonable intelligence and reasonable diligence could wind up having a wheel
come out in use - all they would have to do is forget to check the wheel before
riding and have it loose at that time.

I still use skewers, but only because they're the only game in town without
replacing all 3 of my forks and building new wheels.

Other than that, trading the extra 20 seconds I'd have to spend changing a front
tire for knowing that wheel isn't coming loose, I'd go for through-axle in a
heartbeat.
--
PeteCresswell

Vee November 4th 05 08:49 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Paul Cassel wrote:
Hank Wirtz wrote:


Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.


No it wasn't valid in any sense aside from some plaintiff bar attorneys
wanting to defend what isn't defensible.

Just because a bunch of parasitic lawyers say something is justified
doesn't make it so.


Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.

-Vee


[email protected] November 4th 05 09:17 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

Vee wrote:

Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


Tea is supposed to be made with boiling water. At sea level, that's
212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where is the horror and anguish about tea drinkers?

- Frank Krygowski


Rick November 4th 05 09:27 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

wrote:
Vee wrote:

Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


Tea is supposed to be made with boiling water. At sea level, that's
212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where is the horror and anguish about tea drinkers?


And coffee should be brewed at just over 200 deg F at sea level.
*HOT* coffee and tea are supposed to be hot. It is stupidity, and
crass lawyers, who make people think that tepid is OK. If a place
selling coffee is selling something below 180F, they are selling warm
colored water, not coffee.

- rick


Vee November 4th 05 10:41 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

Rick wrote:
wrote:
Vee wrote:

Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


Tea is supposed to be made with boiling water. At sea level, that's
212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where is the horror and anguish about tea drinkers?


And coffee should be brewed at just over 200 deg F at sea level.
*HOT* coffee and tea are supposed to be hot. It is stupidity, and
crass lawyers, who make people think that tepid is OK. If a place
selling coffee is selling something below 180F, they are selling warm
colored water, not coffee.

- rick


Had my units mixed up. Sorry. 180 FARENHEIT isn't so shocking.

-Vee


(PeteCresswell) November 5th 05 01:49 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per :
I drink _tea_.


That one made my Keepers file.

Thanks.
--
PeteCresswell

(PeteCresswell) November 5th 05 01:54 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per Vee:
Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


When I was playing around with grinding my own, I read that the optimal temp at
brewing time was 170.

To me, at least, a beeeeeg diff between coffee and tea is that tea can be
enjoyed at any temp from quite hot to room temp. OTOH, coffee that's not hot
enough tastes awful.

Coffee doesn't have to be boiling - in fact if it's too hot, it doesn't taste as
full; but once it hits that little paper or Styrofoam cup it starts cooling
pretty fast and for me the hotter it is when it hits the cup, the longer I have
before it's undrinkable.
--
PeteCresswell

David L. Johnson November 5th 05 03:17 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 10:59:03 -0800, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I still use skewers, but only because they're the only game in town without
replacing all 3 of my forks and building new wheels.


Why would you have to replace the forks or build new wheels to put in a
solid axle? If you have cup&cone bearings, you can easily replace the
axle with a solid one, from any bike shop for maybe $10 -- for $10 more I
bet they'd install it.

If you have some sort of cartridge bearing hub, it might take a bit more
money, and searching (depending on brand).

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Become MicroSoft-free forever. Ask me how.
_`\(,_ |
(_)/ (_) |



David L. Johnson November 5th 05 03:19 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 01:33:23 -0600, Hank Wirtz wrote:

"damyth" wrote in
ups.com:



This has to rank up there with the McDonald's hot scalding coffee on
lap lawsuit.



Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.


Nor did McD's have any business selling coffee that hot -- which may have
been the point.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
_`\(,_ | mathematics.
(_)/ (_) |



Jacobe Hazzard November 5th 05 07:35 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Or you could replace the QR skewers with allen-keyed skewers. A lot of
people around here do that to prevent casual theft of wheels, plus you
still don't need to carry a wrench.

David L. Johnson wrote:


Why would you have to replace the forks or build new wheels to put in a
solid axle? If you have cup&cone bearings, you can easily replace the
axle with a solid one, from any bike shop for maybe $10 -- for $10 more I
bet they'd install it.

If you have some sort of cartridge bearing hub, it might take a bit more
money, and searching (depending on brand).



I still use skewers, but only because they're the only game in town

without
replacing all 3 of my forks and building new wheels.



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