CycleBanter.com

CycleBanter.com (http://www.cyclebanter.com/index.php)
-   Techniques (http://www.cyclebanter.com/forumdisplay.php?f=8)
-   -   bigger lawyer lips on the way? (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=115232)

Fritz M November 4th 05 12:48 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/

Sue Wal-Mart for improper assembly or lack of instruction, but to sue
them for providing a useful feature is a bad move, IMO.

RFM
http://www.cyclelicio.us/


David L. Johnson November 4th 05 03:38 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 15:48:49 -0800, Fritz M wrote:

A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/


This article makes it seem as if _any_ bike with QR's is dangerous. OTOH,
it's hard to see any advantage for a bicycle-shaped-toy to have QRs on it,
anyway.

But this claim that the kid was JRA when the wheel fell off is absurd.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Deserves death! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve
_`\(,_ | death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to
(_)/ (_) | them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
-- J. R. R. Tolkein


Phil, Squid-in-Training November 4th 05 05:53 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Fritz M wrote:
A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/

Sue Wal-Mart for improper assembly or lack of instruction, but to sue
them for providing a useful feature is a bad move, IMO.

RFM
http://www.cyclelicio.us/


My suggestion of having a quick-release that does not engage to any extent
until a specific (high) pressure is applied seems to have gone unnoticed.
I'm waiting for my royalties! ;)

--
Phil, Squid-in-Training



Michael Press November 4th 05 06:49 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
In article ,
"David L. Johnson" wrote:

On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 15:48:49 -0800, Fritz M wrote:

A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/


This article makes it seem as if _any_ bike with QR's is dangerous. OTOH,
it's hard to see any advantage for a bicycle-shaped-toy to have QRs on it,
anyway.

But this claim that the kid was JRA when the wheel fell off is absurd.


Probably disc brake ejection.

--
Michael Press
The rest of the world.

Llatikcuf November 4th 05 06:54 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

David L. Johnson wrote:
On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 15:48:49 -0800, Fritz M wrote:

A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/


This article makes it seem as if _any_ bike with QR's is dangerous. OTOH,
it's hard to see any advantage for a bicycle-shaped-toy to have QRs on it,
anyway.

But this claim that the kid was JRA when the wheel fell off is absurd.


I don't know, I've seen people tighten down quick-releases by using the
lever as leverage to screw it down -- like a wrench handle, they had no
idea you had to close it to tighten it down! And these were adults!!

-Nate


damyth November 4th 05 07:43 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

David L. Johnson wrote:
On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 15:48:49 -0800, Fritz M wrote:

A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/


This article makes it seem as if _any_ bike with QR's is dangerous. OTOH,
it's hard to see any advantage for a bicycle-shaped-toy to have QRs on it,
anyway.

But this claim that the kid was JRA when the wheel fell off is absurd.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Deserves death! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve
_`\(,_ | death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to
(_)/ (_) | them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
-- J. R. R. Tolkein


Sigh.... Yeah, I too question the wisdom of Wal-Mart selling bikes with
QR's. Too many clueless parents who don't know any better (and their
correspondingly clueless kids) and who don't grok the concept of
personal responsibility.

This has to rank up there with the McDonald's hot scalding coffee on
lap lawsuit.


Hank Wirtz November 4th 05 08:33 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
"damyth" wrote in
ups.com:



This has to rank up there with the McDonald's hot scalding coffee on
lap lawsuit.



Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.

Hank

Francesco Devittori November 4th 05 08:34 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Fritz M wrote:
A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/

Sue Wal-Mart for improper assembly or lack of instruction, but to sue
them for providing a useful feature is a bad move, IMO.

RFM
http://www.cyclelicio.us/



From shokbikes.org:

"Since the accident, Virginia’s had two heart attacks and a knee
replacement. Worrying about her son with his post-accident issues has
been difficult. She believes that parents and their children should be
made aware of the problems with these bikes, and that ultimately the
companies and manufacturers should be responsible for the products they
distribute and sell."


If those people are not able to use a quick release, wal-mart should
just produce one-piece fork-wheels. So when they puncture they replace
the whole bike and they are happy.
Anyway when you read those stories you notice they don't even know the
difference between wheel and tire.

[email protected] November 4th 05 12:59 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Obviously, the quick release is a Darwinian evolutionary mechanism.


Bruce Gilbert November 4th 05 01:06 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

"Francesco Devittori" frenkatfrenkdtcm wrote in message
...
Fritz M wrote:
A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/

Sue Wal-Mart for improper assembly or lack of instruction, but to sue
them for providing a useful feature is a bad move, IMO.

RFM
http://www.cyclelicio.us/



From shokbikes.org:

"Since the accident, Virginia’s had two heart attacks and a knee
replacement. Worrying about her son with his post-accident issues has
been difficult. She believes that parents and their children should be
made aware of the problems with these bikes, and that ultimately the
companies and manufacturers should be responsible for the products they
distribute and sell."


If those people are not able to use a quick release, wal-mart should
just produce one-piece fork-wheels. So when they puncture they replace
the whole bike and they are happy.
Anyway when you read those stories you notice they don't even know the
difference between wheel and tire.



One of my riding buddies (about 50 years of racing) had a crack up one
morning. He failed to adequately tighten the QR on his rear wheel. Turned
out of the parking lot, stood up to accelerate and the wheel shifted. The
wheel pressed the tire against the chainstay and brake block. He went flying
off the front performing a perfect UCI style aerial roll before a
dentist-pleasing face plant. The plastic surgeon who rides with us felt an
actual surge in his wallet at the moment of impact.

My point here is that these sort of accidents can and do happen. People just
get sloppy or get distracted when they do stuff on their bikes, or cars for
that matter. But, to blame everything on the manufacturer is absurd... until
you speak to a lawyer. Then it becomes a matter of following the money to
try getting some. That is their business, like it or not. It is a simple
formula: something happened, follow the money, get some of it....

See, everything in life is clearly explained in this newsgroup if you read
it long enough!

Bruce



Paul Cassel November 4th 05 02:27 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Hank Wirtz wrote:


Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.


No it wasn't valid in any sense aside from some plaintiff bar attorneys
wanting to defend what isn't defensible.

Just because a bunch of parasitic lawyers say something is justified
doesn't make it so.

Jasper Janssen November 4th 05 02:30 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On 3 Nov 2005 15:48:49 -0800, "Fritz M" wrote:

A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/

Sue Wal-Mart for improper assembly or lack of instruction, but to sue
them for providing a useful feature is a bad move, IMO.


These appear to *all* involve a particular brand (NEXT) and type of bike,
which has been *recalled* because of defective quick releases. That has
nothing to do with QRs in general, it's just these ones that suck.

Jasper

Hank Wirtz November 4th 05 02:44 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Paul Cassel wrote in news:s7ydnd7aUMw2_PbeRVn-
:

Hank Wirtz wrote:


Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.


No it wasn't valid in any sense aside from some plaintiff bar attorneys
wanting to defend what isn't defensible.

Just because a bunch of parasitic lawyers say something is justified
doesn't make it so.


Huh? Serving something that can cause THIRD degree burns from a drive-
through window isn't reckless? Continuing to do so after HUNDREDS of out-
of-court settlements for other people with second and third degree burns
borders on criminal negligence.


And, yeah, Wal-Mart shouldn't sell QR wheels.

[email protected] November 4th 05 04:19 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

Hank Wirtz wrote:


Huh? Serving something that can cause THIRD degree burns from a drive-
through window isn't reckless?


Heh. I'm going to really frighten you, Hank. Pay attention:

I drink _tea_.

Yes! That horribly risky beverage that says, on the teabag wrapper, to
pour BOILING water into the cup! A full, rolling boil! And yes, I've
gotten tea at fast food joints!

Now, I'll admit I generally make and drink only one cup at a time, so
my riskiness has its limits. But I've heard of little old ladies and
little girls having entire _parties_ where they make POTS of the stuff!
What's worse, they actually pre-heat the pots with boiling water
(True! Look it up!) before they add fresh boiling water to make the
tea.

Why, each teapot is a veritable hot-water bomb! And these risk-takers
don't even have heat-proof frilly white dresses! The large, floppy
hats they wear provide almost no protection either.

Now, for me, there are limits. I'm not into the parties. I'm
definitely not going to wear the risky, frilly white dresses they use.
;-) And a full _pot_ of boiling, bubbling water is a little scary even
for me! But I stand up for their right to risk their own... um, laps.

Admittedly, I'm a little worried about calling attention to the thrills
of reckless tea drinking. There's bound to be some safety organization
that'll want to outlaw it. Or at least mandate asbestos aprons. But
meanwhile, we tea drinkers _revel_ in the risk. "Too hot for human
consumption?" HAH! If it's too hot, you're too old!

In fact, I think I'll go have a cup now!

- Frank Krygowski


mark November 4th 05 04:22 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
"Llatikcuf" wrote
I don't know, I've seen people tighten down quick-releases by using the
lever as leverage to screw it down -- like a wrench handle, they had no
idea you had to close it to tighten it down! And these were adults!!

-Nate


I remember my father (college educated, reasonably high paying government
job) trying to do that to my Peugeot PX-10. I've also seen bikes sold by
stores other than LBSs with the quick-release tightened down that way. A
quick release isn't completely self-explanatory, especially now that the
lawyer lips force you to loosen the adjusting barrel to get it out of the
front dropouts.
--
mark



mark November 4th 05 04:29 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
"Fritz M" wrote ...
A mom in West Virginia is suing Wal-Mart for selling defective bikes.
The defect? Quick release front wheels. More info at
http://www.shokbikes.org/

Sue Wal-Mart for improper assembly or lack of instruction, but to sue
them for providing a useful feature is a bad move, IMO.

RFM


As long as Wal-Mart pays its drones piece rate to assemble its crappy
bicycles, the bikes are going to be badly assembled and unsafe to ride.
--
mark



Alex Rodriguez November 4th 05 04:57 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
In article om,
says...


Obviously, the quick release is a Darwinian evolutionary mechanism.


To be fair, some of the folks mention that no owners manual came with the
bike and they were not given any instruction on how to use a quick release.
For many people a QR is not intuitive. You would not believe how many people I
see riding bikes when the QR was just used as a lever to screw down skewer. It
is pretty easy to spot the open QR.
--------------
Alex


D'ohBoy November 4th 05 05:59 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
bcrow opined:

Obviously, the quick release is a Darwinian evolutionary mechanism.


Hah! Intelligent design is the obvious origin as Tullio Campagnolo
originated the QR.

D'ohBoy

"It isn't global warming - it's intelligent defrosting!"


(PeteCresswell) November 4th 05 07:46 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per Hank Wirtz:
Huh? Serving something that can cause THIRD degree burns from a drive-
through window isn't reckless? Continuing to do so after HUNDREDS of out-
of-court settlements for other people with second and third degree burns
borders on criminal negligence.


But don't I have to weigh that up against getting lukewarm coffee for the rest
of my life?
--
PeteCresswell

Scott Gordo November 4th 05 07:49 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

wrote:
Obviously, the quick release is a Darwinian evolutionary mechanism.


For 7 year old kids? That's a tad harsh. Especially when the Walmart
guys putting these things together aren't exactly aces. I've seen
plenty of Walmart-type bikes with the forks installed backwards. Who
knows what they'd do with a QR?
At the least, Walmart and the manufacturer should have protected
themselves by offering instructions, both written and demonstrated.
/s


(PeteCresswell) November 4th 05 07:59 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per Bruce Gilbert:
One of my riding buddies (about 50 years of racing) had a crack up one
morning. He failed to adequately tighten the QR on his rear wheel....


My point here is that these sort of accidents can and do happen.


I've never had an accident. I'm still trying to train myself to check QR
tension before getting on the bike. I do it sometimes and when I remember that
I forgot, I stop and do it right then and there.

Having said that, one day I pulled the bike off the carrier on the back of my
car, got on it, and rode off: no check. First time I applied the front brake
it felt funny. Turned out front skewer was *really* loose - i.e. just a little
more and the wheel would have come out. As it was, the lawyer lips probably
saved me.

I'll never know why it was loose - user error the night before? - something
about vibration on the rack?....

But the reason seems moot to me. The bottom line seems to be that somebody of
reasonable intelligence and reasonable diligence could wind up having a wheel
come out in use - all they would have to do is forget to check the wheel before
riding and have it loose at that time.

I still use skewers, but only because they're the only game in town without
replacing all 3 of my forks and building new wheels.

Other than that, trading the extra 20 seconds I'd have to spend changing a front
tire for knowing that wheel isn't coming loose, I'd go for through-axle in a
heartbeat.
--
PeteCresswell

Vee November 4th 05 08:49 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Paul Cassel wrote:
Hank Wirtz wrote:


Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.


No it wasn't valid in any sense aside from some plaintiff bar attorneys
wanting to defend what isn't defensible.

Just because a bunch of parasitic lawyers say something is justified
doesn't make it so.


Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.

-Vee


[email protected] November 4th 05 09:17 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

Vee wrote:

Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


Tea is supposed to be made with boiling water. At sea level, that's
212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where is the horror and anguish about tea drinkers?

- Frank Krygowski


Rick November 4th 05 09:27 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

wrote:
Vee wrote:

Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


Tea is supposed to be made with boiling water. At sea level, that's
212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where is the horror and anguish about tea drinkers?


And coffee should be brewed at just over 200 deg F at sea level.
*HOT* coffee and tea are supposed to be hot. It is stupidity, and
crass lawyers, who make people think that tepid is OK. If a place
selling coffee is selling something below 180F, they are selling warm
colored water, not coffee.

- rick


Vee November 4th 05 10:41 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

Rick wrote:
wrote:
Vee wrote:

Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


Tea is supposed to be made with boiling water. At sea level, that's
212 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where is the horror and anguish about tea drinkers?


And coffee should be brewed at just over 200 deg F at sea level.
*HOT* coffee and tea are supposed to be hot. It is stupidity, and
crass lawyers, who make people think that tepid is OK. If a place
selling coffee is selling something below 180F, they are selling warm
colored water, not coffee.

- rick


Had my units mixed up. Sorry. 180 FARENHEIT isn't so shocking.

-Vee


(PeteCresswell) November 5th 05 01:49 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per :
I drink _tea_.


That one made my Keepers file.

Thanks.
--
PeteCresswell

(PeteCresswell) November 5th 05 01:54 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per Vee:
Did you check out the link? I was inclined to agree with you until I
read that, prior to this lawsuit, McDonald's kept their coffee at 180+
degrees. That's a different kind of "hot" than ordinary coffee or your
tea.


When I was playing around with grinding my own, I read that the optimal temp at
brewing time was 170.

To me, at least, a beeeeeg diff between coffee and tea is that tea can be
enjoyed at any temp from quite hot to room temp. OTOH, coffee that's not hot
enough tastes awful.

Coffee doesn't have to be boiling - in fact if it's too hot, it doesn't taste as
full; but once it hits that little paper or Styrofoam cup it starts cooling
pretty fast and for me the hotter it is when it hits the cup, the longer I have
before it's undrinkable.
--
PeteCresswell

David L. Johnson November 5th 05 03:17 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 10:59:03 -0800, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I still use skewers, but only because they're the only game in town without
replacing all 3 of my forks and building new wheels.


Why would you have to replace the forks or build new wheels to put in a
solid axle? If you have cup&cone bearings, you can easily replace the
axle with a solid one, from any bike shop for maybe $10 -- for $10 more I
bet they'd install it.

If you have some sort of cartridge bearing hub, it might take a bit more
money, and searching (depending on brand).

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Become MicroSoft-free forever. Ask me how.
_`\(,_ |
(_)/ (_) |



David L. Johnson November 5th 05 03:19 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 01:33:23 -0600, Hank Wirtz wrote:

"damyth" wrote in
ups.com:



This has to rank up there with the McDonald's hot scalding coffee on
lap lawsuit.



Which, when you look at it in any depth, was an entirely valid lawsuit.

http://caoc.com/CA/index.cfm?event=showPage&pg=facts



But yeah, Wal-Mart has no business selling bikes with QR wheels.


Nor did McD's have any business selling coffee that hot -- which may have
been the point.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
_`\(,_ | mathematics.
(_)/ (_) |



Jacobe Hazzard November 5th 05 07:35 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Or you could replace the QR skewers with allen-keyed skewers. A lot of
people around here do that to prevent casual theft of wheels, plus you
still don't need to carry a wrench.

David L. Johnson wrote:


Why would you have to replace the forks or build new wheels to put in a
solid axle? If you have cup&cone bearings, you can easily replace the
axle with a solid one, from any bike shop for maybe $10 -- for $10 more I
bet they'd install it.

If you have some sort of cartridge bearing hub, it might take a bit more
money, and searching (depending on brand).



I still use skewers, but only because they're the only game in town

without
replacing all 3 of my forks and building new wheels.


Jacobe Hazzard November 5th 05 07:37 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
I don't know why I formatted that post upside down.

(PeteCresswell) November 5th 05 06:47 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Per Jacobe Hazzard:
Or you could replace the QR skewers with allen-keyed skewers. A lot of
people around here do that to prevent casual theft of wheels, plus you
still don't need to carry a wrench.


That wouldn't satisfy my particular paranoia. My concern is the fastener
coming loose enough for the wheel to eject past the lawyer lips.

The beauty of through-axle to me is that it's fault-tolerant. i.e. the screws
can be *really* loose and it still stays in place.
--
PeteCresswell

Llatikcuf November 5th 05 10:05 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 

(PeteCresswell) wrote:
That wouldn't satisfy my particular paranoia. My concern is the fastener
coming loose enough for the wheel to eject past the lawyer lips.

The beauty of through-axle to me is that it's fault-tolerant. i.e. the screws
can be *really* loose and it still stays in place.
--
PeteCresswell


Seems to me all quick release skewers should come with some kind of
locking mechanism that would prevent loosening after it was fastened.
Even if the skewer were tightened just a little it would not unscrew,
never getting loose enough to bypass the lawyer lips.

-Nate


Jasper Janssen November 5th 05 10:23 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On Sat, 05 Nov 2005 09:47:38 -0800, "(PeteCresswell)" wrote:
Per Jacobe Hazzard:
Or you could replace the QR skewers with allen-keyed skewers. A lot of
people around here do that to prevent casual theft of wheels, plus you
still don't need to carry a wrench.


That wouldn't satisfy my particular paranoia. My concern is the fastener
coming loose enough for the wheel to eject past the lawyer lips.

The beauty of through-axle to me is that it's fault-tolerant. i.e. the screws
can be *really* loose and it still stays in place.


Also, allen-skewers lack visual indication that they are loose, which
regular skewers do show at even the most casual glance (at least for the
main QR motion).

Jasper

Jasper Janssen November 6th 05 05:08 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
On 5 Nov 2005 13:05:38 -0800, "Llatikcuf" wrote:

Seems to me all quick release skewers should come with some kind of
locking mechanism that would prevent loosening after it was fastened.
Even if the skewer were tightened just a little it would not unscrew,
never getting loose enough to bypass the lawyer lips.


A washer with *real* interlocking serrations (not the puny .1 mm deep crap
on QRs now) that on the other side fits in the dropout slot so it can't
rotate would seem to be the obvious answer. If you make left and right w/
frex 39 and 40 serrations, there is not even the minor reduction in
adjustability.

Jasper

Phil, Squid-in-Training November 7th 05 12:44 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Jasper Janssen wrote:
On 5 Nov 2005 13:05:38 -0800, "Llatikcuf" wrote:

Seems to me all quick release skewers should come with some kind of
locking mechanism that would prevent loosening after it was fastened.
Even if the skewer were tightened just a little it would not unscrew,
never getting loose enough to bypass the lawyer lips.


A washer with *real* interlocking serrations (not the puny .1 mm deep
crap on QRs now) that on the other side fits in the dropout slot so
it can't rotate would seem to be the obvious answer. If you make left
and right w/ frex 39 and 40 serrations, there is not even the minor
reduction in adjustability.

Jasper


In addition, people who do not know how to use QRs wouldn't be able to
physically wingnut the skewer closed because the serrations would prevent
tightness.
--
Phil, Squid-in-Training



Alex Rodriguez November 7th 05 08:45 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
In article .com,
says...

Seems to me all quick release skewers should come with some kind of
locking mechanism that would prevent loosening after it was fastened.


If tightened properly, the cam mechanism keeps the QR closed. You have to
increase the tension to get over the cam's high spot before you can release
the wheel.

Even if the skewer were tightened just a little it would not unscrew,
never getting loose enough to bypass the lawyer lips.


I'm sure you could feel the front wheel moving around.
----------------
Alex


Llatikcuf November 8th 05 07:54 AM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
If tightened properly, the cam mechanism keeps the QR closed. You have to
increase the tension to get over the cam's high spot before you can release
the wheel.


This is true

I'm sure you could feel the front wheel moving around.


Yes I'm sure you could. We were talking about kids who buy their bikes
at walmart.... You or I and the story is different.

-Nate


Alex Rodriguez November 8th 05 05:54 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
In article .com,
says...

Yes I'm sure you could. We were talking about kids who buy their bikes
at walmart.... You or I and the story is different.


Agreed. The staff should be requred to leave instructions on the wheel and
show the parents how to operate the QR before they walk out of the store.
Make each parent sign a statement saying they were instructed in the proper
use of a QR would be a good idea.
-------------
Alex


Vee November 8th 05 10:57 PM

bigger lawyer lips on the way?
 
Alex Rodriguez wrote:
In article .com,
says...

Yes I'm sure you could. We were talking about kids who buy their bikes
at walmart.... You or I and the story is different.


Agreed. The staff should be requred to leave instructions on the wheel and
show the parents how to operate the QR before they walk out of the store.
Make each parent sign a statement saying they were instructed in the proper
use of a QR would be a good idea.
-------------
Alex


Do you read warning labels (such as instructions on the wheel or QR
lever)? Have you tried demonstrating QR operation to people? There is
no way to guaranty that somebody understands QR operation without
forcing them to secure the wheel right in front of you. That can be
awkward, time-consuming, and sometimes patronizing. "Wheels not
straight... you didn't hook the brake up right... lever's not tight
enough..."

Imagine placing this burden on a $6/hr clerk at Walmart.

-Vee



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:56 PM.
Home - Home - Home - Home - Home

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CycleBanter.com