CycleBanter.com

CycleBanter.com (http://www.cyclebanter.com/index.php)
-   Techniques (http://www.cyclebanter.com/forumdisplay.php?f=8)
-   -   Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=199395)

[email protected] January 24th 09 03:28 AM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? What is the best way to remove an old tread and
what kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a
casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge
Cyclocross tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda
clincher tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible.
Cheers,
Simon

Carl Sundquist January 24th 09 03:57 AM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? What is the best way to remove an old tread and
what kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a
casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge
Cyclocross tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda
clincher tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible.
Cheers,
Simon


So check with Dugast. Alternately, you might see if Tire Alert can be of
assistance.

[email protected] January 24th 09 06:51 PM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
On Jan 23, 6:57*pm, Carl Sundquist wrote:
wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? *What is the best way to remove an old tread and
what kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a
casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge
Cyclocross tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda
clincher tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast *performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible.
Cheers,
Simon


So check with Dugast. Alternately, you might see if Tire Alert can be of
assistance.


Thanks for that, I am doubtful as to whether Dugast will share any
secrets of the art with me, perhaps TireAlert will.

Carl Sundquist January 25th 09 05:14 AM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
wrote:
On Jan 23, 6:57 pm, Carl Sundquist wrote:
wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? What is the best way to remove an old tread and
what kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a
casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge
Cyclocross tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda
clincher tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible.
Cheers,
Simon

So check with Dugast. Alternately, you might see if Tire Alert can be of
assistance.


Thanks for that, I am doubtful as to whether Dugast will share any
secrets of the art with me, perhaps TireAlert will.


I'm not sure if it's still done, but there were mechanics at the six
days that would peel off an old, worn tread and glue on a replacement.

I would think that your big concern is that unlike gluing a new tread on
a tubular casing, a clincher almost invariably has the tire carcass and
tread molded together. Is your clincher carcass separate from the tread?

Stephen Bauman January 25th 09 05:46 AM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 18:28:34 -0800, simonvickers66 wrote:

Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? What is the best way to remove an old tread and what
kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge Cyclocross
tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda clincher
tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible. Cheers,
Simon


If the tread is dried and cracked, then the chances are that the exposed
sidewall is also dried out. Ditto for the latex inner tube. Even if the
polyester sidewall appears good, air and water may found their way to the
inner tube. You did say these were cyclocross tires, right? :=)

My first inclination is that you're wasting your time and money because
the inner tube may need replacement.

If the only thing that's bad are cracks on the rubber, try patching the
cracks with a modern day equivalent of Treadstop (the stuff never
worked). If no rubber is missing from the tread, you can use super glue
to hold the sides of the cut together. I've used super glue to repair
clincher tubes to repair pinholes near the valve. Once the cut holds,
leave the tire overnight to cure before applying pressure on the cut. You
can make small rubber plugs to replace divots.

However, be careful. Cracks in the rubber tread may also mean a slight
tear in the casing. You've got to inspect each one with a magnifying
glass. If you've got a tear in the casing, do you really want to boot the
tubular.

Stephen Bauman

[email protected] January 25th 09 06:27 PM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
On Jan 24, 8:14*pm, Carl Sundquist wrote:
wrote:
On Jan 23, 6:57 pm, Carl Sundquist wrote:
wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? *What is the best way to remove an old tread and
what kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a
casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge
Cyclocross tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda
clincher tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast *performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible.
Cheers,
Simon
So check with Dugast. Alternately, you might see if Tire Alert can be of
assistance.


Thanks for that, I am doubtful as to whether Dugast will share any
secrets of the art with me, perhaps TireAlert will.


I'm not sure if it's still done, but there were mechanics at the six
days that would peel off an old, worn tread and glue on a replacement.

I would think that your big concern is that unlike gluing a new tread on
a tubular casing, a clincher almost invariably has the tire carcass and
tread molded together. Is your clincher carcass separate from the tread?


No the tires I have laying around are not separate from the casing, I
figure that will be a huge problem when I attempt to glue it up. I
might be able to obtain some tubular tires with a torn casing and use
those treads.

[email protected] January 25th 09 06:38 PM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
On Jan 24, 8:46*pm, Stephen Bauman wrote:
On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 18:28:34 -0800, simonvickers66 wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? *What is the best way to remove an old tread and what
kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge Cyclocross
tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda clincher
tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast *performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible. Cheers,
Simon


If the tread is dried and cracked, then the chances are that the exposed
sidewall is also dried out. Ditto for the latex inner tube. Even if the
polyester sidewall appears good, air and water may found their way to the
inner tube. You did say these were cyclocross tires, right? :=)

My first inclination is that you're wasting your time and money because
the inner tube may need replacement.

If the only thing that's bad are cracks on the rubber, try patching the
cracks with a modern day equivalent of Treadstop (the stuff never
worked). If no rubber is missing from the tread, you can use super glue
to hold the sides of the cut together. I've used super glue to repair
clincher tubes to repair pinholes near the valve. Once the cut holds,
leave the tire overnight to cure before applying pressure on the cut. You
can make small rubber plugs to replace divots.

However, be careful. Cracks in the rubber tread may also mean a slight
tear in the casing. You've got to inspect each one with a magnifying
glass. If you've got a tear in the casing, do you really want to boot the
tubular.

Stephen Bauman


Thanks for all the input. I have had the itch to do this for a while
and I am not worried about wasting the time or money. I did a crummy
job of storing some tubular tires when I moved out from the coast to
the desert and the tires are definitely spares and not race worthy.
Some of the tires have had their tubes replaced by Tire Alert even
though the casings are pretty beat. The tires I have left over hold
air but are pretty worn. Most of the racing I did on them was on
fairly dry and gravelly courses and they chew up the tires pretty
bad. I don't plan on racing these tires or even doing any serious
riding on them.
Anyway, I figure it's worth a shot and if I have any leaky tubes, I
will try to plug it up with Tufo sealant just so I can see how they
roll around.
Simon.

A Muzi January 25th 09 10:11 PM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
simonvickers66 wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? What is the best way to remove an old tread and what
kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge Cyclocross
tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda clincher
tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible. Cheers,
Simon


Stephen Bauman wrote:
If the tread is dried and cracked, then the chances are that the exposed
sidewall is also dried out. Ditto for the latex inner tube. Even if the
polyester sidewall appears good, air and water may found their way to the
inner tube. You did say these were cyclocross tires, right? :=)
My first inclination is that you're wasting your time and money because
the inner tube may need replacement.
If the only thing that's bad are cracks on the rubber, try patching the
cracks with a modern day equivalent of Treadstop (the stuff never
worked). If no rubber is missing from the tread, you can use super glue
to hold the sides of the cut together. I've used super glue to repair
clincher tubes to repair pinholes near the valve. Once the cut holds,
leave the tire overnight to cure before applying pressure on the cut. You
can make small rubber plugs to replace divots.
However, be careful. Cracks in the rubber tread may also mean a slight
tear in the casing. You've got to inspect each one with a magnifying
glass. If you've got a tear in the casing, do you really want to boot the
tubular.


wrote:
Thanks for all the input. I have had the itch to do this for a while
and I am not worried about wasting the time or money. I did a crummy
job of storing some tubular tires when I moved out from the coast to
the desert and the tires are definitely spares and not race worthy.
Some of the tires have had their tubes replaced by Tire Alert even
though the casings are pretty beat. The tires I have left over hold
air but are pretty worn. Most of the racing I did on them was on
fairly dry and gravelly courses and they chew up the tires pretty
bad. I don't plan on racing these tires or even doing any serious
riding on them.
Anyway, I figure it's worth a shot and if I have any leaky tubes, I
will try to plug it up with Tufo sealant just so I can see how they
roll around.



You do realize that in 3-packs new tubs run $16.67 each? How much of
your time is an old tub worth given a worn casing/tread and a leak?

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

[email protected] January 26th 09 06:05 AM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
On Jan 25, 1:11*pm, A Muzi wrote:
*simonvickers66 wrote:
Hi, I am going to attempt to re-tread a tubular tire, anyone got any
ideas about that? *What is the best way to remove an old tread and what
kind of glue will stick a new tread (from a clincher) to a casing.
I am hoping to remove a dried, cracked tread from a Challenge Cyclocross
tubular and then glue the tread from a Specialized or Kenda clincher
tire to the casing.
I have heard rumors that A. Dugast *performs this service and I have
seen some custom tubulars so I know it is possible. Cheers,
Simon

*Stephen Bauman wrote:
If the tread is dried and cracked, then the chances are that the exposed
sidewall is also dried out. Ditto for the latex inner tube. Even if the
polyester sidewall appears good, air and water may found their way to the
inner tube. You did say these were cyclocross tires, right? :=)
My first inclination is that you're wasting your time and money because
the inner tube may need replacement.
If the only thing that's bad are cracks on the rubber, try patching the
cracks with a modern day equivalent of Treadstop (the stuff never
worked). If no rubber is missing from the tread, you can use super glue
to hold the sides of the cut together. I've used super glue to repair
clincher tubes to repair pinholes near the valve. Once the cut holds,
leave the tire overnight to cure before applying pressure on the cut. You
can make small rubber plugs to replace divots.
However, be careful. Cracks in the rubber tread may also mean a slight
tear in the casing. You've got to inspect each one with a magnifying
glass. If you've got a tear in the casing, do you really want to boot the
tubular.

wrote:
Thanks for all the input. *I have had the itch to do this for a while
and I am not worried about wasting the time or money. *I did a crummy
job of storing some tubular tires when I moved out from the coast to
the desert and the tires are definitely spares and not race worthy.
Some of the tires have had their tubes replaced by Tire Alert even
though the casings are pretty beat. *The tires I have left over hold
air but are pretty worn. *Most of the racing I did on them was on
fairly dry and gravelly courses and they chew up the tires pretty
bad. *I don't plan on racing these tires or even doing any serious
riding on them.
Anyway, I figure it's worth a shot and if I have any leaky tubes, I
will try to plug it up with Tufo sealant just so I can see how they
roll around.


You do realize that in 3-packs new tubs run $16.67 each? *How much of
your time is an old tub worth given a worn casing/tread and a leak?

--
Andrew Muzi
* www.yellowjersey.org/
* Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Sorry, I might have explained this all wrong.
I want to see if I can replace the tread on a 700 X 32 cyclocross tire
with a more aggressive tire tread. I am not talking about road tubs
and I know that you can't buy a 3 pack of CX tubulars for $16.67 ea.
Anyway, I have plenty of tires to ride on the road and I am not going
to mess with those at all.
The point of all this is that there aren't so many tread options for
cyclocross tubulars and it would be interesting, to me, to see if I
could put a different tire tread onto a cyclocross tubular casing.
Knobby for mud, semi slick for sand and turf... I don't know, I just
wanted to see if it's possible.
I have some tires that are nearly junk, but hold air, and I have a few
that the casing appears to have aged to a nice orange color, yet the
tread has become dried and cracked. The tires are just hanging around
my shop and I can't seem to toss them and while they aren't really
worth anything, they aren't entirely worthless either. Anyway it is
just an experiment, I have all of the parts except I don't know what
kind of glue might be best to stick the tread onto the casing.
If you have any ideas about glue, removing a knobby tread from
clincher tire casing, or mounting the tread to the casing, that would
be the most useful information for me.
Cheers,
Simon

Dan O January 26th 09 07:01 AM

Gluing Tread on a Tubular Casing
 
On Jan 25, 9:05 pm, wrote:


I want to see if I can replace the tread on a 700 X 32 cyclocross tire
with a more aggressive tire tread.


I might look for a good tire with thick tread, lots of contact patch,
and workable tread design, then - using a razor blade - cut away some
of the tread to achieve the desired pattern.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:10 AM.
Home - Home - Home - Home - Home

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CycleBanter.com