CycleBanter.com

CycleBanter.com (http://www.cyclebanter.com/index.php)
-   Techniques (http://www.cyclebanter.com/forumdisplay.php?f=8)
-   -   Hot rodding e-bikes (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=257570)

Frank Krygowski[_4_] June 12th 19 05:35 PM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski

[email protected] June 12th 19 08:07 PM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 11:35:23 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski


According to Giant's e-bike website.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...-bike-go/21531

"In Europe, an E-bike can have a maximum power of 250 watts, assisting the E-Bike to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.6 mph). In the U.S., the rules are different. There, E-bike motors can have a maximum of 500 watts and assist up to 20 mph (32km/h).
There are also E-bikes that support up to 45km/h (28 mph). These are referred to as pedelecs."

So your comment about dangerous 45 kph (28 mph) electric bicycles are officially "pedelecs". This is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedelec

"Many jurisdictions classify pedelecs as bicycles as opposed to mopeds or motorcycles. More powerful e-bikes, such as the S-Pedelecs and power-on-demand e-bikes (those whose motors can provide assistance regardless of whether the rider is pedalling or not) are often classified as mopeds or even motorcycles with the rider thus subject to the regulations of such motor vehicles, e.g. having a license and a vehicle registration, wearing a helmet etc."

So...there seems to be differences in what is considered an e-bike and a pedelec and exactly how fast they can go and whether they are officially mopeds or bicycles depending on which state/country you live in. As for people "breaking the law and souping up there e-bike to an illegal speed", I've only been around for half a century, but I am fairly certain there have been human beings breaking the law ever since the first law was enacted thousands upon thousands of years ago. I'm somewhat shocked you are just realizing this simple fact Frank.

Frank Krygowski[_4_] June 12th 19 08:39 PM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On 6/12/2019 3:07 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 11:35:23 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski


According to Giant's e-bike website.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...-bike-go/21531

"In Europe, an E-bike can have a maximum power of 250 watts, assisting the E-Bike to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.6 mph). In the U.S., the rules are different. There, E-bike motors can have a maximum of 500 watts and assist up to 20 mph (32km/h).
There are also E-bikes that support up to 45km/h (28 mph). These are referred to as pedelecs."

So your comment about dangerous 45 kph (28 mph) electric bicycles are officially "pedelecs". This is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedelec

"Many jurisdictions classify pedelecs as bicycles as opposed to mopeds or motorcycles. More powerful e-bikes, such as the S-Pedelecs and power-on-demand e-bikes (those whose motors can provide assistance regardless of whether the rider is pedalling or not) are often classified as mopeds or even motorcycles with the rider thus subject to the regulations of such motor vehicles, e.g. having a license and a vehicle registration, wearing a helmet etc."

So...there seems to be differences in what is considered an e-bike and a pedelec and exactly how fast they can go and whether they are officially mopeds or bicycles depending on which state/country you live in. As for people "breaking the law and souping up there e-bike to an illegal speed", I've only been around for half a century, but I am fairly certain there have been human beings breaking the law ever since the first law was enacted thousands upon thousands of years ago. I'm somewhat shocked you are just realizing this simple fact Frank.


A) Who are you quoting with that "breaking the law" quote? It wasn't me.

B) What gave you the idea I just now realized there are lawbreakers?
What an odd statement!

C) You didn't address my point. Do you see anything likely to go wrong
with hot-rodding an e-bike?

--
- Frank Krygowski

JBeattie June 12th 19 08:51 PM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 12:39:09 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/12/2019 3:07 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 11:35:23 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski


According to Giant's e-bike website.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...-bike-go/21531

"In Europe, an E-bike can have a maximum power of 250 watts, assisting the E-Bike to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.6 mph). In the U.S., the rules are different. There, E-bike motors can have a maximum of 500 watts and assist up to 20 mph (32km/h).
There are also E-bikes that support up to 45km/h (28 mph). These are referred to as pedelecs."

So your comment about dangerous 45 kph (28 mph) electric bicycles are officially "pedelecs". This is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedelec

"Many jurisdictions classify pedelecs as bicycles as opposed to mopeds or motorcycles. More powerful e-bikes, such as the S-Pedelecs and power-on-demand e-bikes (those whose motors can provide assistance regardless of whether the rider is pedalling or not) are often classified as mopeds or even motorcycles with the rider thus subject to the regulations of such motor vehicles, e.g. having a license and a vehicle registration, wearing a helmet etc."

So...there seems to be differences in what is considered an e-bike and a pedelec and exactly how fast they can go and whether they are officially mopeds or bicycles depending on which state/country you live in. As for people "breaking the law and souping up there e-bike to an illegal speed", I've only been around for half a century, but I am fairly certain there have been human beings breaking the law ever since the first law was enacted thousands upon thousands of years ago. I'm somewhat shocked you are just realizing this simple fact Frank.


A) Who are you quoting with that "breaking the law" quote? It wasn't me.

B) What gave you the idea I just now realized there are lawbreakers?
What an odd statement!

C) You didn't address my point. Do you see anything likely to go wrong
with hot-rodding an e-bike?


Hot-rodded eBikes are already a thing. The future is now. The practical effect is sharing a bike lane with a silent, lightweight motorcycle -- usually driven by an incompetent.

-- Jay Beattie.

Sir Ridesalot June 12th 19 08:55 PM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 3:51:35 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
Snipped
Hot-rodded eBikes are already a thing. The future is now. The practical effect is sharing a bike lane with a silent, lightweight motorcycle -- usually driven by an incompetent.

-- Jay Beattie.


I think these E-bikes, let alone the "hot-rodded" ones are a real hazard when on bicycle lanes or MUPs. At least that's my opinion based on the ones I see around here. Other locations may be different.

Cheers

jOHN b. June 13th 19 01:08 AM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:35:18 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?


Singapore figured this all out some years ago and passed laws limiting
e-bikes to their placarded power and limited their use (pathways,
highways, etc). And I believe that currently e-bikes must be
registered and have number plates.

The penalty for illegally modifying an e-bike is $2,000 and/or 3
months in jail.
--
cheers,

John B.


jOHN b. June 13th 19 01:16 AM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:07:57 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 11:35:23 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski


According to Giant's e-bike website.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...-bike-go/21531

"In Europe, an E-bike can have a maximum power of 250 watts, assisting the E-Bike to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.6 mph). In the U.S., the rules are different. There, E-bike motors can have a maximum of 500 watts and assist up to 20 mph (32km/h).
There are also E-bikes that support up to 45km/h (28 mph). These are referred to as pedelecs."

So your comment about dangerous 45 kph (28 mph) electric bicycles are officially "pedelecs". This is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedelec

"Many jurisdictions classify pedelecs as bicycles as opposed to mopeds or motorcycles. More powerful e-bikes, such as the S-Pedelecs and power-on-demand e-bikes (those whose motors can provide assistance regardless of whether the rider is pedalling or not) are often classified as mopeds or even motorcycles with the rider thus subject to the regulations of such motor vehicles, e.g. having a license and a vehicle registration, wearing a helmet etc."

So...there seems to be differences in what is considered an e-bike and a pedelec and exactly how fast they can go and whether they are officially mopeds or bicycles depending on which state/country you live in. As for people "breaking the law and souping up there e-bike to an illegal speed", I've only been around for half a century, but I am fairly certain there have been human beings breaking the law ever since the first law was enacted thousands upon thousands of years ago. I'm somewhat shocked you are just realizing this simple fact Frank.


Cain and Abel?
--
cheers,

John B.


[email protected] June 13th 19 01:49 AM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 2:39:09 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/12/2019 3:07 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 11:35:23 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski


According to Giant's e-bike website.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...-bike-go/21531

"In Europe, an E-bike can have a maximum power of 250 watts, assisting the E-Bike to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.6 mph). In the U.S., the rules are different. There, E-bike motors can have a maximum of 500 watts and assist up to 20 mph (32km/h).
There are also E-bikes that support up to 45km/h (28 mph). These are referred to as pedelecs."

So your comment about dangerous 45 kph (28 mph) electric bicycles are officially "pedelecs". This is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedelec

"Many jurisdictions classify pedelecs as bicycles as opposed to mopeds or motorcycles. More powerful e-bikes, such as the S-Pedelecs and power-on-demand e-bikes (those whose motors can provide assistance regardless of whether the rider is pedalling or not) are often classified as mopeds or even motorcycles with the rider thus subject to the regulations of such motor vehicles, e.g. having a license and a vehicle registration, wearing a helmet etc."

So...there seems to be differences in what is considered an e-bike and a pedelec and exactly how fast they can go and whether they are officially mopeds or bicycles depending on which state/country you live in. As for people "breaking the law and souping up there e-bike to an illegal speed", I've only been around for half a century, but I am fairly certain there have been human beings breaking the law ever since the first law was enacted thousands upon thousands of years ago. I'm somewhat shocked you are just realizing this simple fact Frank.


A) Who are you quoting with that "breaking the law" quote? It wasn't me.


I guess I added the quotations incorrectly. I used your words to imply illegal. You used "Hot rodding" in the thread title. And your link is titled "souped-up-electric-bikes-a-potential-accident-waiting-to-happen-authority-says". And you use the words "Unskilled", "newbies", "blasting". All of those words imply a bit of illegality. Except maybe newbie.



B) What gave you the idea I just now realized there are lawbreakers?
What an odd statement!


You started a thread on a bicycle forum titled "Hot rodding". And linked to an article titled "souped-up-electric-bikes-a-potential-accident-waiting-to-happen-authority-says". Hot rodding kind of implies law breaking. And your link mentions authorities, law enforcement, being concerned with it. Your thread seems to be surprised that this illegal and/or dangerous activity would occur.


C) You didn't address my point. Do you see anything likely to go wrong
with hot-rodding an e-bike?


No I did not address the two questions at the end of your post.

--
- Frank Krygowski



Frank Krygowski[_4_] June 13th 19 02:13 AM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On 6/12/2019 8:49 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 2:39:09 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/12/2019 3:07 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 11:35:23 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?

--
- Frank Krygowski

According to Giant's e-bike website.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/globa...-bike-go/21531

"In Europe, an E-bike can have a maximum power of 250 watts, assisting the E-Bike to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.6 mph). In the U.S., the rules are different. There, E-bike motors can have a maximum of 500 watts and assist up to 20 mph (32km/h).
There are also E-bikes that support up to 45km/h (28 mph). These are referred to as pedelecs."

So your comment about dangerous 45 kph (28 mph) electric bicycles are officially "pedelecs". This is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedelec

"Many jurisdictions classify pedelecs as bicycles as opposed to mopeds or motorcycles. More powerful e-bikes, such as the S-Pedelecs and power-on-demand e-bikes (those whose motors can provide assistance regardless of whether the rider is pedalling or not) are often classified as mopeds or even motorcycles with the rider thus subject to the regulations of such motor vehicles, e.g. having a license and a vehicle registration, wearing a helmet etc."

So...there seems to be differences in what is considered an e-bike and a pedelec and exactly how fast they can go and whether they are officially mopeds or bicycles depending on which state/country you live in. As for people "breaking the law and souping up there e-bike to an illegal speed", I've only been around for half a century, but I am fairly certain there have been human beings breaking the law ever since the first law was enacted thousands upon thousands of years ago. I'm somewhat shocked you are just realizing this simple fact Frank.


A) Who are you quoting with that "breaking the law" quote? It wasn't me.


I guess I added the quotations incorrectly.


Yes.

I used your words to imply illegal. You used "Hot rodding" in the thread title. And your link is titled "souped-up-electric-bikes-a-potential-accident-waiting-to-happen-authority-says". And you use the words "Unskilled", "newbies", "blasting". All of those words imply a bit of illegality. Except maybe newbie.


.... and except "unskilled." I know we're in an ASCII based forum and
there are limitations, so sometimes we bend the typical rules for the
sake of efficiency. But generally, it's a bad idea to put words in
another's mouth. That's the straw man argument technique.


B) What gave you the idea I just now realized there are lawbreakers?
What an odd statement!


You started a thread on a bicycle forum titled "Hot rodding". And linked to an article titled "souped-up-electric-bikes-a-potential-accident-waiting-to-happen-authority-says". Hot rodding kind of implies law breaking. And your link mentions authorities, law enforcement, being concerned with it. Your thread seems to be surprised that this illegal and/or dangerous activity would occur.


Nope, I long ago suspected this would happen. In fact, I have a friend
in a distant state who has been doing it for years. In his case, it's
not illegal (AFAIK) because his state has had no relevant laws.

He's an electrical engineer and enjoys the tinkering. But at least a
year ago I read that USB "chips" were available to bypass the program
controls for some e-bikes. To me, that does sound like trouble.

In fact, stock e-bikes have some potential for trouble, as Jay noted. I
think it was John Allen (author of the excellent Street Smarts booklet)
who pointed out that until now, there's been at least a rough
correlation between a rider's average speed and his skill on the bike.
E-bikes destroy that correlation. "Chipped" ones will be worse.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Andre Jute[_2_] June 13th 19 11:14 AM

Hot rodding e-bikes
 
On Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 5:35:23 PM UTC+1, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Seems it's easy to modify an e-bike to travel up to about 45 kph.


You're an innocent abroad, Franki-boy. Read passim at
https://endless-sphere.com/forums/vi...5b18e3f f0f33
and be amazed

http://cphpost.dk/news/souped-up-ele...rity-says.html


I get so bored with these sanctimonious curtain-twitchers telling us what we and cannot do.

Unskilled newbies blasting through traffic at 30 mph? Sure! What could
go wrong?


Do you have to be so negative all the time, Franki-boy. This is why journalists, on whose goodwill any wannabe "spokesman for bicycles" has to depend, instantly hate you and call you a "scold".

--
- Frank Krygowski


Sanctimonious asshole.

Andre Jiute
Yesterday I rode with a guy whose bike had 4in wide tyres and a 750W motor. Wheee, what a breeze! Here's his bike: https://radpowerbikes.eu/products/ra...ctric-fat-bike Never mind the 25kph top speed in the specs -- it's easy to get at the software to give this bike a top speed of, well, let's not tell tales out of school to encourage purse-lip naysayers like Krygowski.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:29 PM.
Home - Home - Home - Home - Home

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CycleBanter.com