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-   -   Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly? (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=256268)

Joerg[_2_] August 24th 18 03:35 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b

When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Sir Ridesalot August 24th 18 04:25 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b

When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps. They are like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle that does not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them to secure a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use them for fastening everything to the bike when touring. In addition to that I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent etcetera instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's a link to an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260

You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are 3/4" wide.

Cheers

AMuzi August 24th 18 05:00 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On 8/24/2018 9:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously
didn't test the bike racks for our local buses before
signing the contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't
fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily the driver was
patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my
panniers but worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up
on the other side of the rack slot. We both had bungee cords
with which we strapped them down as hard as we could. Oh,
and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB tires barely
squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks like
this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on
even that barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


Special bike = special accessories:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6P6logRiwo

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971



Sir Ridesalot August 24th 18 05:21 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 11:25:58 AM UTC-4, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b

When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps. They are like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle that does not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them to secure a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use them for fastening everything to the bike when touring. In addition to that I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent etcetera instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's a link to an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260

You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are 3/4" wide.

Cheers


Addendum

I forgot to mention that I use those Arno Straps to secure my mountain bicyle to the front rack on our inter-city bus. It's great insurance for when the bus is running at highway speeds.

Cheers

Frank Krygowski[_4_] August 24th 18 06:11 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On 8/24/2018 10:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


I wouldn't fault the rack designer too much. Bikes come in such
incredible variety it's tricky to design even stationary bike racks. And
transit companies are seldom flush with funds. They can spend only so
much to accommodate the one percent with unusual bikes.

As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht


--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Sir Ridesalot August 24th 18 06:35 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 1:11:09 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 10:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test the
bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long story
short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily
the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but
worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the other side of the
rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as
hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks
like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


I wouldn't fault the rack designer too much. Bikes come in such
incredible variety it's tricky to design even stationary bike racks. And
transit companies are seldom flush with funds. They can spend only so
much to accommodate the one percent with unusual bikes.

As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht


--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


The Arno Strap I reference in my earlier reply are so simple to use. What's really neat is that they are so easy to release and doing so does not delay the bus for more than a few seconds. When not in use to hold the bike to the bus rack an Arno strap can be used for many other things - such as towing another bicyclist or strapping a keg of beer to a rear bicycle rack. LOL I use a couple to hold my big jug of spring water to the rear bicycle rack when I go to and from the freshwater spring to refill the jug.

Cheers

Cheers

Joerg[_2_] August 24th 18 07:09 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On 2018-08-24 09:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 11:25:58 AM UTC-4, Sir Ridesalot
wrote:
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 10:35:42 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't
test the bike racks for our local buses before signing the
contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither
did my friend's. Luckily the driver was patient and helpful. We
had to load the bikes reversed so the hook goes over the rear
wheel. Not easy because of my panniers but worked, somehow. The
front wheels now rode up on the other side of the rack slot. We
both had bungee cords with which we strapped them down as hard as
we could. Oh, and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB
tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack
looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b



When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


You should look into getting a few Cohglans Arno Straps. They are
like super long nylon toestraps and have a metal buckle that does
not fall apart when reefed really tight. I'ved used them to secure
a recliner rocker chair to my rear bike rack. I also use them for
fastening everything to the bike when touring. In addition to that
I use them for holding the rolled up sleeping bag, tent etcetera
instead of having to fumble with laces etcetera. Here's a link to
an actual card with two Arno straps on it.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/...9227/cat101260



Aha, Arno straps! Thanks, those look very good. They can also come in
handy when something structural breaks on the bike during a trail ride.




You can get them in lengths of 36" to 60". The straps are 3/4" wide.

Cheers


Addendum

I forgot to mention that I use those Arno Straps to secure my
mountain bicyle to the front rack on our inter-city bus. It's great
insurance for when the bus is running at highway speeds.


On the freeway the bus driver really stepped on it and actually passed a
tour bus. I was concerned that the handlebar of my bike might smash a
front window on the bus but despite being just 2" from it that didn't
happen. He took corners Mario Andretti style and luckily neither bike
flew out sideways. The bungees were all that was holding them sideways
to the bus depending on curve direction (away from the hook).

If I was an engineer on the design review for such a rack (they don't
seem to hold any design reviews ...) I'd insist that there are wheel
hooks for front and rear wheel. And, of course, slots long enough for
29ers and 27-1/2 bikes. In fact, then you could leave the slots open to
the curb side making loading and unloading much easier for older riders
who can't lift a bike upwards while bent over (something even young
people should avoid).

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Joerg[_2_] August 24th 18 07:11 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On 2018-08-24 09:00, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/24/2018 9:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously
didn't test the bike racks for our local buses before
signing the contract. Long story short my 29er bike didn't
fit in and neither did my friend's. Luckily the driver was
patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes reversed so
the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my
panniers but worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up
on the other side of the rack slot. We both had bungee cords
with which we strapped them down as hard as we could. Oh,
and the slot width barely fit my 2.25" wide MTB tires barely
squeezed in and I had to push down hard. The rack looks like
this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b



When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on
even that barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster
than wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


Special bike = special accessories:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6P6logRiwo


I've got those. Takes too long. Yesterday we held up the bus at that
stop for 4min. Not good.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Joerg[_2_] August 24th 18 07:17 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On 2018-08-24 10:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 10:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test
the bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long
story short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's.
Luckily the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes
reversed so the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my
panniers but worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the
other side of the rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we
strapped them down as hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely
fit my 2.25" wide MTB tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down
hard. The rack looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


I wouldn't fault the rack designer too much. Bikes come in such
incredible variety it's tricky to design even stationary bike racks. And
transit companies are seldom flush with funds. They can spend only so
much to accommodate the one percent with unusual bikes.


In this day and age 27-1/2" and 29" bikes hardly represent 1%. And yes,
the designers are at fault. They should have tested or at least hold a
design review with actual cyclists attending. In med-tech we are
obligated to hold those and for good reasons.

Also, as I wrote even a simple 26" MTB didn't fit completely, the rear
wheel remained an inch above the rail floor. In my book that constitutes
a thoroughly botched design.


As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht


Thanks, but I do not trust plastic for this stuff. The Arno straps that
Sir mentioned seem to be the ticket here. Of course, there remains the
risk that a picky bus driver refuses to accept that mounting method and
we'd be stranded.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Sir Ridesalot August 24th 18 08:01 PM

Bus bike rack too short, how to strap in a bike quickly?
 
On Friday, August 24, 2018 at 2:17:27 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-08-24 10:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/24/2018 10:35 AM, Joerg wrote:
Couldn't believe it. Those great agency folks obviously didn't test
the bike racks for our local buses before signing the contract. Long
story short my 29er bike didn't fit in and neither did my friend's.
Luckily the driver was patient and helpful. We had to load the bikes
reversed so the hook goes over the rear wheel. Not easy because of my
panniers but worked, somehow. The front wheels now rode up on the
other side of the rack slot. We both had bungee cords with which we
strapped them down as hard as we could. Oh, and the slot width barely
fit my 2.25" wide MTB tires barely squeezed in and I had to push down
hard. The rack looks like this:

https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/spg/sho...8df2678ec2064b


When we arrived another rider put his 26" MTB on there on even that
barely fit in (rear wheel rode up half an inch).

Does anyone know a better "strap down" method that is faster than
wrapping a bungee around rim and rack numerous times?


I wouldn't fault the rack designer too much. Bikes come in such
incredible variety it's tricky to design even stationary bike racks. And
transit companies are seldom flush with funds. They can spend only so
much to accommodate the one percent with unusual bikes.


In this day and age 27-1/2" and 29" bikes hardly represent 1%. And yes,
the designers are at fault. They should have tested or at least hold a
design review with actual cyclists attending. In med-tech we are
obligated to hold those and for good reasons.

Also, as I wrote even a simple 26" MTB didn't fit completely, the rear
wheel remained an inch above the rail floor. In my book that constitutes
a thoroughly botched design.


As to your question: I wonder if a velcro strap with rectangular ring
might work. They're fast to install and surprisingly strong. See, for
example:

https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Cabl...g=UTF8&s=a ht


Thanks, but I do not trust plastic for this stuff. The Arno straps that
Sir mentioned seem to be the ticket here. Of course, there remains the
risk that a picky bus driver refuses to accept that mounting method and
we'd be stranded.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Around here the bus drivers don't mind the few seconds it takes to use a long Arno strap to secure the bike to the rack. I just loop the strap around the top tube of the bike and then around the bus rack and cinch the Arno strap tight. It takes just seconds and I usually have it done whilst other passengers are getting on or off the bus.

Arno straps are really tough as are their buckles. I've never had an Arno strap fail nor its buckle even when being used in the dead of winter. I've had many a plastic buckle snap when being cinched in winter's cold.

Cheers


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