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Old July 28th 17, 12:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Default New bike for Jay

On 2017-07-27 15:26, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, July 27, 2017 at 10:35:16 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-07-27 09:39, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, July 27, 2017 at 7:56:30 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-07-26 11:07, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

I don't need a cargo bike. I want something fun to ride on
gravel and through the hills on the way home. If I found
myself in need of a rack, I'd buy a beater frane with rack
mounts -- which I might do.


So you don't carry much back and forth? I did a valley trip
yesterday. Hot day and the extra water alone filled more than
one pannier. On the way back there are no fountains until 3mi
before I am home.

No, again, I don't need a cargo bike. And in a lifetime of
riding, I've hauled water once -- riding across Wyoming in a
place where it was 60 miles between towns. I rode from Seattle to
Portland in a day with peak heat in the 90s and probably filled
my bottles four times. No water bags. No racks. Just two water
bottles that I filled every 50 miles. The distance from Cameron
Park to Sacramento is 34 miles. If you need water bags for that,
then you are a special person.


Yeah, I sweat a lot which I inherited from my dad. However, riding
tens of miles in 100F weather with just a bottle or two is not
healthy for anyone unless you can fill up many times on the way.
Any reputable sports physician would tell you the same. So does the
army.

I generally carry three 28oz bottles plus one or two 17oz
electrolyte ones. On long MTB rides with no safe drinking water
source I carry up to 1-1/2 gallons total. On those rides I often
meet people, mostly hikers, with serious signs of dehydration. Some
of my water occasionally goes to others.


Again, I'm talking about a road bike. I've run out of water and been
miserable for a while, but I've always found water. I'm alive today,
mostly.


It's ok once in a while but going into dehydration on a regular basis
will cause damage.



The topper was a guy in Yosemite Park who seriously had planned to
hike up from the valley to the top of half dome and back, carrying
little water and no food. IIRC he had a couple of small bottles
which were all empty by then. We found him collapsed in bushes near
the trail shortly before you get to the ropes. If I hadn't gazed
out into the nature right there I wouldn't even have seen him and
this guy was in major trouble. Similar for a Chinese woman in Grand
Canyon. And on and on.


I know people who killed themselves by drinking too much water.
Google hyponatremia.


You'd pretty much have to sop up the Columbia River on a bike to get there.


I've done the hike from Glacier Point to Half Dome a bunch of times.
I usually stopped for water at Nevada Falls. I don't know why your
guy was dropping dead at the cables. Dopes do dopey things.


Every time I was there they had signs posted not to drink it because of
Guardia. I guess some folks drank it anyhow.


They don't let you down into the Grand Canyon unless you have water,
so I don't know what the deal was with your Chinese woman, either.
Maybe she did some Kung Fu on the rangers who check your backpack for
water, etc., and ran down the trail.


It's been over 20 years since I was there last but I hiked down to the
Colorado and back numerous times. Kaibab - Bright Angel or sometimes
only on the Bright Angel trail. Nobody ever checked us. In fact, there
wasn't anyone there to check us. The only rangers were at the station
shortly before heading out to the plateau. That's where we brought the
Chinese woman because it looked like she could not walk any farther uphill.


I've been riding a really long time -- continuously. No decade off
for bad traffic. Never have I needed to take multiple gallons of
water on a road ride, including rides across the US from east to west
and north to south (west coast). I've done the Sierra many times,
including the Death Ride twice -- which is really well supported, so
no need for oodles of spare water.



Some routes are well-supported, then I don't take much water either. MTB
routes often have zilch. What you don't carry in you simply won't have
available.


... But even on tour, I think I had a
couple of bottles for a loop from now-burning Mariposa/Yosemite/Lee
Vining/Tahoe/HWY 49 back to Mariposa. I had two bottles on every
other tour but did have a water bag that I mostly used as a blow-up
pillow -- except in Wyoming.

I did screw up and forget to buy food on a bike tour in Oregon. My
wife and I ended up eating blackberries for dinner.



I did that. Once. Not because I messed up but because they looked so
delicious. Probably close to two pounds and then I felt a very sudden
urge to pedal home. Fast.


... There have been
other food or drink mistakes, but nothing epic. Riding down the
wasteland of the California coast, we ran out of gin and tonic --
until we hit the Little River Inn. It was horrible! Ah ha! I did run
out of water on that ride -- between HWY 1 south of Mendocino and
Cloverdale, riding inland over the mountains which were more
mountain-y than expected. We found a little winery in the middle of
nowhere and filled up. We were headed toward a town that turned out
not to be there. Very odd.


I had that in Nevada once. The map listed a town. When we got there it
was completely deserted and quiet, the only noise being an old gas
station sign squeaking in the wind.

--
Regards, Joerg

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