View Single Post
  #3  
Old February 13th 09, 08:09 AM posted to alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.soc,rec.backcountry,ca.environment,sci.environment
Cappy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default How the Typical Mountain Biker Treats Horses and Other TrailUsers

On the other hand the horse would not be alive excep for the one who
rides them for sport. There's not many wild horses around hear. -
Cappy



On Feb 2, 5:18*pm, bluezfolk wrote:
On Feb 1, 12:26*pm, Mike Vandeman wrote:





On Sun, 1 Feb 2009 06:35:41 -0800 (PST), bluezfolk
wrote:


On Jan 31, 11:09*pm, Mike Vandeman wrote:
\"I have lived in Marin since the 50s and have been riding horses here
--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)


Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!


http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande


Personally I've always considered riding a horse as being cruel to an
animal. *Making a 1000 pound horse carry 200 pounds of rider and
saddle etc. is like making a 200 pound human carry 40 pounds for no
reason. *Try walking around all day with a 40 pound pack on your back,
it gets tiring.


If tou ACTUALLY cared about horses, which you don't, you would
advocate banning mountain biking.


40 pounds for a 200-lb human is quite a light pack! I routinely carry
more than 1/4 of my weight for backpacking. You are only demonstrating
your ignorance.


Eric


--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)


Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!


http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande


So make that 50 pounds, but the horse has no choice whether or not to
carry it, you do. *I guess you don't really care about horses either,
since they aren't "wildlife", just extremely dumb animals.

Eric

Eric


Ads
 

Home - Home - Home - Home - Home