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  #1  
Old January 9th 18, 12:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 922
Default handlebar

On steel frame bikes, what material are
handlebars typically made of?

It seems lighter and more shiny than the frame,
but perhaps this is a property of the coating
and/or the steel itself rather than indicative
of another material altogether?

Is the handlebar the most safety-critical part
of the bike?

I have seen several brake but this never
happened to me nor did I ever sense any
inclination it would. Is this because of other
people's more aggressive riding style or do
they have thinner handlebar pipes, or pipes in
softer material?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #2  
Old January 9th 18, 05:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Wim
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Posts: 1
Default handlebar

Hi,

On Tuesday, 09 January at 01:01, Emanuel Berg wrote:

On steel frame bikes, what material are
handlebars typically made of?


they are typically made of aluminium. One bar, a straight one broke on
me. I did hear prior to it breaking, creaking noises. Luckily I was
slowing to a stop when it happened so I wasn't injured.

It seems lighter and more shiny than the frame,
but perhaps this is a property of the coating
and/or the steel itself rather than indicative
of another material altogether?

Is the handlebar the most safety-critical part
of the bike?

I have seen several brake but this never
happened to me nor did I ever sense any
inclination it would. Is this because of other
people's more aggressive riding style or do
they have thinner handlebar pipes, or pipes in
softer material?


--
All the best
Wim
  #3  
Old January 10th 18, 01:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 8,702
Default handlebar

On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 12:01:36 AM UTC, Emanuel Berg wrote:
On steel frame bikes, what material are
handlebars typically made of?

It seems lighter and more shiny than the frame,
but perhaps this is a property of the coating
and/or the steel itself rather than indicative
of another material altogether?

Is the handlebar the most safety-critical part
of the bike?

I have seen several brake but this never
happened to me nor did I ever sense any
inclination it would. Is this because of other
people's more aggressive riding style or do
they have thinner handlebar pipes, or pipes in
softer material?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


Steel. I typically ride with North Road bars and have never even heard of such bars being made of aluminium. It seems likely to me that what Wim had was a specialty item.

Andre Jute
Not reckless
  #4  
Old January 10th 18, 01:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 922
Default handlebar

Andre Jute wrote:

Steel. I typically ride with North Road bars
and have never even heard of such bars being
made of aluminium. It seems likely to me that
what Wim had was a specialty item.


Is there a blacksmith trick to determine this
on an actual handlebar?

Here is a web page [1] that attempts to answer
this question, and from skimming it I imagine
this is the best answer:

Take one piece of aluminium and one piece
of stainless steel and hold it in ur hand -
they must be the same size, you can feel
the weight different: aluminium is much
lighter, while stainless is much heavier.
Or a simple test, take a needle file, just
file on the aluminium and you see that
aluminium material can be removed easily by
filing away with a needle file while
stainless is much harder and you can't file
and remove any material on that piece of
stainless steel, in short stainless is the
heavier and harder material and aluminium
is the lighter and easily
deformed material.

[1] http://www.engineering.com/Ask/tabid...0/Default.aspx

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #5  
Old January 10th 18, 08:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,702
Default handlebar

Just tap the bar with your fingernail. Ali sounds duller than steel. Ali also looks duller than steel. Ali will also display a thicker wall than steel. Finally, it is very likely that an Ali handlebar will have a larger diameter than a steel 'bar.
  #6  
Old January 11th 18, 09:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,177
Default handlebar

On 10/01/18 09:05, Andre Jute wrote:
Just tap the bar with your fingernail. Ali sounds duller than steel.
Ali also looks duller than steel. Ali will also display a thicker
wall than steel. Finally, it is very likely that an Ali handlebar
will have a larger diameter than a steel 'bar.


Going to make fitting that stem a long Sunday afternoon job!

  #7  
Old January 10th 18, 09:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 267
Default handlebar

On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 2:38:52 AM UTC+1, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Andre Jute wrote:

Steel. I typically ride with North Road bars
and have never even heard of such bars being
made of aluminium. It seems likely to me that
what Wim had was a specialty item.


Is there a blacksmith trick to determine this
on an actual handlebar?

Here is a web page [1] that attempts to answer
this question, and from skimming it I imagine
this is the best answer:

Take one piece of aluminium and one piece
of stainless steel and hold it in ur hand -
they must be the same size, you can feel
the weight different: aluminium is much
lighter, while stainless is much heavier.
Or a simple test, take a needle file, just
file on the aluminium and you see that
aluminium material can be removed easily by
filing away with a needle file while
stainless is much harder and you can't file
and remove any material on that piece of
stainless steel, in short stainless is the
heavier and harder material and aluminium
is the lighter and easily
deformed material.

[1] http://www.engineering.com/Ask/tabid...0/Default.aspx

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


Use a magnet.

Lou
  #8  
Old January 10th 18, 04:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,163
Default handlebar

On 1/10/2018 4:40 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 2:38:52 AM UTC+1, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Andre Jute wrote:

Steel. I typically ride with North Road bars
and have never even heard of such bars being
made of aluminium. It seems likely to me that
what Wim had was a specialty item.


Is there a blacksmith trick to determine this
on an actual handlebar?

Here is a web page [1] that attempts to answer
this question, and from skimming it I imagine
this is the best answer:

Take one piece of aluminium and one piece
of stainless steel and hold it in ur hand -
they must be the same size, you can feel
the weight different: aluminium is much
lighter, while stainless is much heavier.
Or a simple test, take a needle file, just
file on the aluminium and you see that
aluminium material can be removed easily by
filing away with a needle file while
stainless is much harder and you can't file
and remove any material on that piece of
stainless steel, in short stainless is the
heavier and harder material and aluminium
is the lighter and easily
deformed material.

[1]
http://www.engineering.com/Ask/tabid...0/Default.aspx

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


Use a magnet.


Exactly. What could be simpler?

The only confusion would be if you'd run into non-magnetic stainless
steel handlebars. But unlike aluminum ones, stainless steel bars are
very rare, if not nonexistent.

I have one bike with aluminum handlebars, North Road style. I paid $7
for them during a bike shop's close-out sale. But you can get them he
https://harriscyclery.net/itemdetails.cfm?ID=2765

They're not very exotic.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #9  
Old January 10th 18, 11:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,702
Default handlebar

On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 4:46:01 PM UTC, Frank Krygowski wrote:

But unlike aluminum ones, stainless steel bars are
very rare, if not nonexistent.


Here you go, Franki-boy. First link that comes up on Google throws out a whole lot of stainless steel handlebars offered on Ebay, and since I had Scharfie's favorite page open, here's a bunch of stainless handlebars you can buy in bulk to set yourself up as a bling dealer --
https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/sta...andlebars.html
-- or buy just one on Aliexpress to educate yourself.

I chuckled at your "non-existent" stainless steel bars. It's so dumb, nobody will believe it. I have two stainless steel handlebars on bikes in the loft, and probably more in boxes of components. One I chose from the Humpert catalogue to be fitted to my Utopia Kranich as a temporary measure just to see how I liked something different from my normal North Road Bars. In Europe Humpert bars are the mainstream for upscale bikes, and they're nutters for testing components. If they list stainless bars, you may be absolutely certain there is nothing wrong with stainless bars.

You should check your facts, Franki-boy.

Andre Jute
Always happy to help

PS The Humpert catalogue also comes in English if you don't speak German.
  #10  
Old January 14th 18, 07:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,833
Default handlebar

On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 02:38:48 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Take one piece of aluminium and one piece
of stainless steel and hold it in ur hand -
they must be the same size, you can feel
the weight different: aluminium is much
lighter, while stainless is much heavier.


It depends on the type of stainless steel. Exotic alloys, complex
heat treatment, and a lengthy annealing process, will produce a
stainless steel that is quite strong and suitable for bicycle frames
(and by implication, handlebars):
http://www.kvastainless.com/tubing-info.html
http://www.kvastainless.com/bicycles/
http://www.kvastainless.com/technical-library.html

The problem is that while steel is fairly cheap, the necessary
elements needed to make stainless (nickel, chromium, vanadium,
silicon, manganese, phosphor, sulfur, etc) will raise the cost. As an
added bonus, stainless work hardens very easily, making fabrication
difficult and expensive.
http://www.qtstools.com/TechInfo/SAE%20steel%20grades.htm

Ferro-chrome ore (which contains about 50-75% chromium), sells for
$2.80/kg (Oct 2017 prices).
http://www.infomine.com/investment/metal-prices/ferro-chrome/
while iron ore runs about $0.30/kg.
http://www.infomine.com/investment/metal-prices/iron-ore-fines/
Very roughly, that would make 20% Chromium stainless cost about
$5.00/kg, while a simple high carbon steel, would be about 1/10th the
prices of stainless.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 




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