A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » General
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #281  
Old August 10th 15, 12:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Rolf Mantel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 147
Default AG: Safety Equipment for Bicycles

Am 04.08.2015 um 18:10 schrieb Frank Krygowski:
I've read that for some folks, problems may be caused by extra-strong
eye dominance. I'm right eye dominant, but have my mirror on my left
glasses temple. I eventually realized I blink every time I turn my
attention to the mirror.


I'm also right-eye dominant with the mirror on the left eye. I started
using the glasses mirror around age 25, and it took me a few hour of
training / weeks of usage until I was fully utilizing the mirror.
I guess the mirror even helped me to protect my good eyesight on the
left eye (which was getting lazy compared to the excellent eye sight of
the right eye at the time).

Rolf "at 45, no need for glasses yet" Mantel

Ads
  #282  
Old August 16th 15, 02:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,182
Default AG: Washing gloves


Bleeding blacks have a variant of the Xanth zombie spell: No matter
how many times you wash them, they have more dye.

So if your poorly-dyed black garment hasn't bled completely white,
keep on rinsing the sweat out of your clothes in two separate buckets.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #283  
Old August 16th 15, 12:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Washing gloves

On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 22:58:30 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


Bleeding blacks have a variant of the Xanth zombie spell: No matter
how many times you wash them, they have more dye.

So if your poorly-dyed black garment hasn't bled completely white,
keep on rinsing the sweat out of your clothes in two separate buckets.


What I do is just shed the sweaty clothes in a pile and my wife takes
care of all the details :-)

In fact she thinks my efforts in either the kitchen or laundry is
something to laugh about, and orders me "Out!" of both places. On the
other hand she seems to feel that stopped up drains are well within my
area of expertise :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #284  
Old August 23rd 15, 03:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,182
Default AG: If you can't miss it, hit it square.


The sharper the angle at which you strike an obstacle, the more likely
it is to steer the bicycle out from under you. Brushing against a
curb that's almost parallel to your velocity is a guaranteed fall, if
you aren't both very lucky and possessed of a track racer's
supernatural balance.

So if you see a flaw in the pavement and have no alternative to riding
over it, come as close to hitting it at right angles as you can.

A drop-off is less likely to steer the bike than a bump, so line up
for the far edge of a hole and the near edge of a bump.

Some, BUT NOT ALL, of the curbs that are used to block the entrances
of driveways, alleys, and parking lots are sloped gently enough that
you can treat them as short, sharp hills: striking one of these at a
sharp angle is equivalent to switchbacking. But don't switchback a
curb when there is another moving vehicle anywhere in the neighborhood
unless you are absolutely, positootly certain that he can -- and will
-- miss you if you fall.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #285  
Old August 30th 15, 12:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,182
Default AG: Legal isn't always smart


Now and again you see a sign telling you that it's legal to ride your
bike on a sidewalk. It may even be a special sidewalk on which curbs
and steps have been replaced with ramps.

It's still a sidewalk. When you ride on a sidewalk, you are totally
and all by yourself responsible for avoiding collisions at
intersections, because the drivers of cars don't see you. Hardly
anybody checks the sidewalk for moving vehicles, and even if you are
seen, you won't be noticed -- a person on a sidewalk is nothing
unusual or relevant to car-driving. His eyes won't linger on you long
enough to notice that you aren't moving like a pedestrian.

As if that weren't enough, every driveway and alley that crosses the
sidewalk is an intersection. On a street, a driver will stop short of
the crosswalk before creeping across the walkway to look for traffic,
but when he is emerging from a driveway or alley, he will pull out to
where he can see the street with almost no attention to the sidewalk.

---------------------

City planners often see no reason not to direct bicycles up the wrong
way of a one-way street. A white stripe may help in the middle of the
block, but at the intersection, someone turning into the one-way
street is NOT going to be prepared to see someone coming toward him.

---------------------

The powers that be get a big thrill out of building multi-user
pathways and putting up signs that say "Bikeway".

Somewhere in the world, there is a bikeway. It has sidewalks.

A multi-user path is a walkway on which people are permitted to play
with wheel toys. When you ride on one, you must use all the
precautions that you would use when riding on a sidewalk.

Bend over backward to avoid causing annoyance or alarm to pedestrians;
dismount if you have to. Speak before you overtake. Watch for dog
leashes stretched across the path. And, no matter how
lightly-traveled the pathway is, never, never put your head down and
sprint. You might run down a toddler or crash into a gate. If you
must sprint, at least watch where you are going.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #286  
Old September 5th 15, 04:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
NFN Smith[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

Joy Beeson wrote:

Now and again you see a sign telling you that it's legal to ride your
bike on a sidewalk. It may even be a special sidewalk on which curbs
and steps have been replaced with ramps.


I'm pretty emphatic on the idea that as a vehicle, a bicycle has all the
rights *and* responsibilities of any other vehicle, including following
the traffic code. A bicycle is not a pedestrian.


It's still a sidewalk. When you ride on a sidewalk, you are totally
and all by yourself responsible for avoiding collisions at
intersections, because the drivers of cars don't see you. Hardly
anybody checks the sidewalk for moving vehicles, and even if you are
seen, you won't be noticed -- a person on a sidewalk is nothing
unusual or relevant to car-driving. His eyes won't linger on you long
enough to notice that you aren't moving like a pedestrian.


Yep. I nearly hit a guy a few weeks ago. I was pulling out of a
driveway of a shopping center, and there was a guy (probably teenager)
on a small BMX bike. I was making a right turn, and he was coming from
my right, on the sidewalk, and against the traffic. Plus, it was night,
and he had no light.

For me, as a motorist, if I'm making a right turn, I'm looking to my
left, to look for oncoming traffic, and I'm not looking right, at at the
sidewalk, for a bicycle that's going several times the speed of a
pedestrian. There was no collision, but he clearly was upset that I had
pulled in front of him.


As if that weren't enough, every driveway and alley that crosses the
sidewalk is an intersection. On a street, a driver will stop short of
the crosswalk before creeping across the walkway to look for traffic,
but when he is emerging from a driveway or alley, he will pull out to
where he can see the street with almost no attention to the sidewalk.


Yep.


---------------------

City planners often see no reason not to direct bicycles up the wrong
way of a one-way street. A white stripe may help in the middle of the
block, but at the intersection, someone turning into the one-way
street is NOT going to be prepared to see someone coming toward him.


Depends on where you are. I live near a major university, and on some of
the major boulevards near campus, on the backs of street signs that
designate bike lanes, the backs have signs with the familiar red-slashed
circle in front of a bicycle, and underneath, "wrong way". I don't
remember for sure, but I think the "wrong way" signs are yellow
background, rather than white background.

One of the things we also have at some intersections around here is that
if there's a designated right turn lane, and a motorist has to cross the
bicycle lane to get to the right turn lane, the marking for the bike
lane becomes a dashed line, and does a good job of communicating to the
motorist that the bike lane continues, and that to get into the right
turn lane, it requires crossing the bike lane.

It wasn't until I'd seen this one a few times, that I realized one of
the fundamental rules, regarding road striping (at least in the US --
I've never completely figured out all the striping in the UK). That one
is that if there is a solid line, a vehicle is expected to stay in that
lane, and a vehicle should not cross a solid line. That's not only a
double yellow line, but a single white line, as well.

A lot of motorists tend not to know this one.

Thus, it's not just handling of bike lanes, but other things, as well,
including entering intersections, places where there's stop-and-go
traffic, such as toll plazas and inspection stations, and in some
places, diamond carpool lanes. I was just in Southern California a
couple of weeks ago, and their carpool lanes are set up where there's a
solid line (in this case, double-yellow) that separates the carpool lane
from the next lane of traffic, and there are breaks only every couple of
miles. When I drive there, I've rarely seen a motorist move in or out of
a diamond lane by crossing over the double line, but waiting until the
designated break spot.


---------------------

The powers that be get a big thrill out of building multi-user
pathways and putting up signs that say "Bikeway".

Somewhere in the world, there is a bikeway. It has sidewalks.

A multi-user path is a walkway on which people are permitted to play
with wheel toys. When you ride on one, you must use all the
precautions that you would use when riding on a sidewalk.


One of the things that often escapes urban planners (and for that
matter, the public in general) is that there's more than one kind of
"cyclist". For many, they tend to project their own experiences on a
bicycle, either as a child, or as casual/occasional adult rider, where
the speed of the rider is expected to be consistent with a pedestrian,
and where the bicycle often is regarded as a "toy". From the perspective
of the motorist, this kind of rider is essentially a standing object,
and for policy purposes, something that should be isolated from motor
traffic, as much as possible.

And yes, this is where most of the expectation of design of "bike
lanes", "bikeways", etc. Not only urban bikeways that are magnets for
non-cyclists (walkers, runners, people on rollerblades, people pushing
strollers, skate boarders, etc.), but also spaces around schools, where
the "cyclists" are mostly children (with varying riding skills) that are
going to and from school.

A separate class of cyclist are the riders who really ride -- commuters,
fast fitness riders etc., who are often going at considerably faster
speeds, and longer distances than the casual riders. And far better
skills at handling the bike, as well as riding in traffic.

Not too far from where I live, there's an urban bikeway, and close by, a
major arterial boulevard. The boulevard is three lanes of traffic in
each direction, and I believe that the posted speed limit is 50 MPH, and
there's no marking for bike lines, although there's adequate space for
bicycles. It's pretty clear that the urban planners expect all bicycle
traffic to use the bikeway.

However, the bikeway is the typical magnet for foot traffic. Personally,
I'm quite content to go out there on my rollerblades, but if I'm on my
bike, I'm sticking to the street, because my activity (and speed) is far
more consistent with motor vehicle traffic, than it is in trying to
dodge the foot traffic that accumulates on the bikeway. For a cyclist,
riding the bikeway is analogous to a motorist driving in a school zone
-- it may get you to where you want to go, but expect frequent stops to
allow for slower traffic.

I should note that this for this particular situation, I'm not
advocating that all cyclists use the street. It's one that takes
experience, of good bike handling skills, and good skills in riding in
traffic -- and where the cyclist knows that he/she is following all the
rules of the Motor Vehicle Code, including red lights and stop signs. I
know plenty of casual riders that have no business on that particular
street, and should be using the bikeway.


Bend over backward to avoid causing annoyance or alarm to pedestrians;
dismount if you have to. Speak before you overtake. Watch for dog
leashes stretched across the path. And, no matter how
lightly-traveled the pathway is, never, never put your head down and
sprint. You might run down a toddler or crash into a gate. If you
must sprint, at least watch where you are going.


Absolutely, but at the same time, stay away from the sidewalks. The
relationship between the bicycle and the sidewalk should perpendicular,
where the bike is on a sidewalk only for crossing it, and access to a
driveway. For the bikeways, if you need to be there, the bike is at the
top of the figurative food chain, the fastest and most aggressive that
is there. Thus, that means that you have to assume that *you* have a
speed limit.

Smith


  #287  
Old September 6th 15, 03:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,415
Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

On 9/5/2015 11:07 AM, NFN Smith wrote:
Joy Beeson wrote:

Now and again you see a sign telling you that it's legal to ride your
bike on a sidewalk. It may even be a special sidewalk on which curbs
and steps have been replaced with ramps.


I'm pretty emphatic on the idea that as a vehicle, a bicycle has all the
rights *and* responsibilities of any other vehicle, including following
the traffic code. A bicycle is not a pedestrian.


It's still a sidewalk. When you ride on a sidewalk, you are totally
and all by yourself responsible for avoiding collisions at
intersections, because the drivers of cars don't see you. Hardly
anybody checks the sidewalk for moving vehicles, and even if you are
seen, you won't be noticed -- a person on a sidewalk is nothing
unusual or relevant to car-driving. His eyes won't linger on you long
enough to notice that you aren't moving like a pedestrian.


Yep. I nearly hit a guy a few weeks ago. I was pulling out of a
driveway of a shopping center, and there was a guy (probably teenager)
on a small BMX bike. I was making a right turn, and he was coming from
my right, on the sidewalk, and against the traffic. Plus, it was night,
and he had no light.

For me, as a motorist, if I'm making a right turn, I'm looking to my
left, to look for oncoming traffic, and I'm not looking right, at at the
sidewalk, for a bicycle that's going several times the speed of a
pedestrian. There was no collision, but he clearly was upset that I had
pulled in front of him.


As if that weren't enough, every driveway and alley that crosses the
sidewalk is an intersection. On a street, a driver will stop short of
the crosswalk before creeping across the walkway to look for traffic,
but when he is emerging from a driveway or alley, he will pull out to
where he can see the street with almost no attention to the sidewalk.


Yep.


---------------------

City planners often see no reason not to direct bicycles up the wrong
way of a one-way street. A white stripe may help in the middle of the
block, but at the intersection, someone turning into the one-way
street is NOT going to be prepared to see someone coming toward him.


Depends on where you are. I live near a major university, and on some of
the major boulevards near campus, on the backs of street signs that
designate bike lanes, the backs have signs with the familiar red-slashed
circle in front of a bicycle, and underneath, "wrong way". I don't
remember for sure, but I think the "wrong way" signs are yellow
background, rather than white background.

One of the things we also have at some intersections around here is that
if there's a designated right turn lane, and a motorist has to cross the
bicycle lane to get to the right turn lane, the marking for the bike
lane becomes a dashed line, and does a good job of communicating to the
motorist that the bike lane continues, and that to get into the right
turn lane, it requires crossing the bike lane.

It wasn't until I'd seen this one a few times, that I realized one of
the fundamental rules, regarding road striping (at least in the US --
I've never completely figured out all the striping in the UK). That one
is that if there is a solid line, a vehicle is expected to stay in that
lane, and a vehicle should not cross a solid line. That's not only a
double yellow line, but a single white line, as well.

A lot of motorists tend not to know this one.

Thus, it's not just handling of bike lanes, but other things, as well,
including entering intersections, places where there's stop-and-go
traffic, such as toll plazas and inspection stations, and in some
places, diamond carpool lanes. I was just in Southern California a
couple of weeks ago, and their carpool lanes are set up where there's a
solid line (in this case, double-yellow) that separates the carpool lane
from the next lane of traffic, and there are breaks only every couple of
miles. When I drive there, I've rarely seen a motorist move in or out of
a diamond lane by crossing over the double line, but waiting until the
designated break spot.


---------------------

The powers that be get a big thrill out of building multi-user
pathways and putting up signs that say "Bikeway".

Somewhere in the world, there is a bikeway. It has sidewalks.

A multi-user path is a walkway on which people are permitted to play
with wheel toys. When you ride on one, you must use all the
precautions that you would use when riding on a sidewalk.


One of the things that often escapes urban planners (and for that
matter, the public in general) is that there's more than one kind of
"cyclist". For many, they tend to project their own experiences on a
bicycle, either as a child, or as casual/occasional adult rider, where
the speed of the rider is expected to be consistent with a pedestrian,
and where the bicycle often is regarded as a "toy". From the perspective
of the motorist, this kind of rider is essentially a standing object,
and for policy purposes, something that should be isolated from motor
traffic, as much as possible.

And yes, this is where most of the expectation of design of "bike
lanes", "bikeways", etc. Not only urban bikeways that are magnets for
non-cyclists (walkers, runners, people on rollerblades, people pushing
strollers, skate boarders, etc.), but also spaces around schools, where
the "cyclists" are mostly children (with varying riding skills) that are
going to and from school.

A separate class of cyclist are the riders who really ride -- commuters,
fast fitness riders etc., who are often going at considerably faster
speeds, and longer distances than the casual riders. And far better
skills at handling the bike, as well as riding in traffic.

Not too far from where I live, there's an urban bikeway, and close by, a
major arterial boulevard. The boulevard is three lanes of traffic in
each direction, and I believe that the posted speed limit is 50 MPH, and
there's no marking for bike lines, although there's adequate space for
bicycles. It's pretty clear that the urban planners expect all bicycle
traffic to use the bikeway.

However, the bikeway is the typical magnet for foot traffic. Personally,
I'm quite content to go out there on my rollerblades, but if I'm on my
bike, I'm sticking to the street, because my activity (and speed) is far
more consistent with motor vehicle traffic, than it is in trying to
dodge the foot traffic that accumulates on the bikeway. For a cyclist,
riding the bikeway is analogous to a motorist driving in a school zone
-- it may get you to where you want to go, but expect frequent stops to
allow for slower traffic.

I should note that this for this particular situation, I'm not
advocating that all cyclists use the street. It's one that takes
experience, of good bike handling skills, and good skills in riding in
traffic -- and where the cyclist knows that he/she is following all the
rules of the Motor Vehicle Code, including red lights and stop signs. I
know plenty of casual riders that have no business on that particular
street, and should be using the bikeway.


Bend over backward to avoid causing annoyance or alarm to pedestrians;
dismount if you have to. Speak before you overtake. Watch for dog
leashes stretched across the path. And, no matter how
lightly-traveled the pathway is, never, never put your head down and
sprint. You might run down a toddler or crash into a gate. If you
must sprint, at least watch where you are going.


Absolutely, but at the same time, stay away from the sidewalks. The
relationship between the bicycle and the sidewalk should perpendicular,
where the bike is on a sidewalk only for crossing it, and access to a
driveway. For the bikeways, if you need to be there, the bike is at the
top of the figurative food chain, the fastest and most aggressive that
is there. Thus, that means that you have to assume that *you* have a
speed limit.


Good post. Just one quibble:

"... if there is a solid line, a vehicle is expected to stay in that
lane, and a vehicle should not cross a solid line. That's not only a
double yellow line, but a single white line, as well."

In Ohio, the Ohio Bicycle Federation got a law passed specifically
permitting motorists to cross a solid yellow line, when safe to do so,
in order to pass a vehicle (that includes bicycle) moving less than half
the speed limit.

It's a good law. It's what people have always done when needing to pass
a disabled vehicle creeping along the road, a mail truck stopping at
every mailbox, a horse and buggy, and a slow-moving bicycle in a lane
too narrow to share - provided the cyclist is smart enough to stay out
of the gutter.

The yellow lines are painted with the assumption that one car is trying
to pass a slightly slower one. They're unrealistically restrictive for
passing truly slow vehicles.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #288  
Old September 6th 15, 05:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,182
Default AG: A newspaper cooler


When I was at the Burlington Bike Shop between Nappanee and Bremen, I
saw folding wire panniers just like mine except that the bottom panel
is the currently-fashionable perforated sheet metal instead of wires.
This leads me to think that there might be people who can use my
method of making a cooler out of newspaper.

Folding wire panniers were originally designed to fit standard paper
grocery bags. By happy chance, this makes them fit standard
newspapers, so all you need to make one into a cooler are newspapers
and plastic grocery bags.

The description is written for very thin newspapers; if your paper is
thick, you may need to use sections instead of whole papers.

Being a serious cyclist, I always carry a bag of crumpled grocery bags
to use as packing material when I buy something fragile. When I
started doing that, I figured that every now and again the bags would
get in my way and I'd toss them into the nearest trash bin, but it
seems that when my panniers fill up, I use a lot of packing material
-- and if there are bags left over, a bag of bags on top of a piled-up
pannier serves to wedge everything down and protect items from the
pressure of the bungee cords.

--------------- side trip

It is possible to fold a plastic grocery bag so flat that it takes up
almost no space at all.

This is easier done than said; don't let the complicated instructions
scare you.

Take hold of the ends of the seam at the bottom and pull to straighten
it out. Repeat for the seams in the handles. The second step is
harder, because the handles have usually been scrunched.

Put a finger in one handle and a finger of the other hand into the
pleat at the bottom of the bag and pull. The bag will straighten out
and the pleats will re-form. Repeat on the other side.

Stroke from the bottom of the bag toward the opening to drive out the
air, then fold the bag in half lengthwise and stroke again. Fold
again and stroke again.

The average-size bag is narrow enough at this stage. Put the palm of
one hand on the bottom seam and flatten the bag with the other hand,
then fold it in half crosswise. Flatten again, fold again.

When I build a cooler, the first step is to shingle the bottom of the
pannier with bags flattened in this manner. (There are usually
already bags there from the last time, since there is no reason to
remove them when I remove the cooler.)

I put bags under my cooler so that when I wedge all of my crumpled
bags down between things, then buy one more item, I can reach up
between the wires and pull out a bag to tie the extra item to the rack
with. This would be quite impossible if the bottom of the pannier
were fine mesh like the panniers at Burlington, so . . . um . . .
delete this entire section.

--------------- /side trip


To begin the cooler, line a pannier with a plastic grocery bag, to
keep wind from blowing between the newspapers. This is akin to the
"wind shell" that used to be worn over down sweaters.

If none of your bags is large enough, line the pannier with smaller
bags that you have squashed flat, so that you can use them like small,
irregular pieces of sheet plastic. (The squashing needn't be neat;
wrinkles add insulation.) Choose white bags if you have any, to turn
the sun.

Put a bag in each corner, the straightest part even with the top wire
and the middle of the bag pressed into the corner, with the handles of
the bag straggling across the bottom of the pannier. Then arrange
more bags overlapping the first four to fill up the gaps.

Next, take a newspaper folded the way papers are in paper dispensers,
hold the fold against the top wire of one side of the pannier, and use
your other hand to force it to fold into the corner between side and
bottom. Line the other side with another newspaper.

At one time, the next step was to fold a newspaper in half, but papers
are narrower than they used to be, so fold about a third of the paper
to make it just a tiny bit wider than the end of the pannier. Place
it with the new fold in the corner and the old fold even with the top
wire, then force the rest of it to fit. This wedges the side
newspapers into place. Put another newspaper in the other end.

If the insulation isn't thick enough, add another layer of newspaper.
At the ends, line up the thin side of the new layer with the thick
side of the first layer.

If you lined the pannier with a single large bag, fold it down over
the first layer so that the second layer can hold it in place.

At first, I folded a newspaper in half and wedged it down on the floor
to hold the sides in place, then I noticed that the floor was already
at least as thick as the sides and stopped doing that.

Now line the completed cooler with another plastic bag; since the
inside measurements are now smaller, odds are you have one that's big
enough. This helps to keep the newspapers dry, and also allows you to
carry everything you packed into the cooler into the house in one
trip.

After filling the cooler, fold the lining bag over the contents and
put in a newspaper folded in half as a lid. Then use your bag of
crumpled bags to fill up the pannier, and use two bungees to hold it
down. (The space between the newspaper lid and the bag of crumpled
bags is a good place to stash things you want kept out of the sun, but
not chilled.)

To make a bungee lid on a wire pannier, put the ends of the bungees
through the wires from the inside out, one bungee end on each side of
the hinge wires of the pannier end, just below the top wire, so that
the bungee is held by its middle and both ends dangle outside the
pannier. Bring the hooks up over the top wire and hook them to the
other end. Repeat with the other bungee at the other end.

If the bungee is too long, span more than one wire. If you pile up
more stuff than the bungees can stretch over, hook two of the hooks to
each other, so that three strands of bungee make a Z.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #289  
Old September 6th 15, 12:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: A newspaper cooler

On Sun, 06 Sep 2015 01:05:47 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


When I was at the Burlington Bike Shop between Nappanee and Bremen, I
saw folding wire panniers just like mine except that the bottom panel
is the currently-fashionable perforated sheet metal instead of wires.
This leads me to think that there might be people who can use my
method of making a cooler out of newspaper.

Folding wire panniers were originally designed to fit standard paper
grocery bags. By happy chance, this makes them fit standard
newspapers, so all you need to make one into a cooler are newspapers
and plastic grocery bags.

The description is written for very thin newspapers; if your paper is
thick, you may need to use sections instead of whole papers.

Being a serious cyclist, I always carry a bag of crumpled grocery bags
to use as packing material when I buy something fragile. When I
started doing that, I figured that every now and again the bags would
get in my way and I'd toss them into the nearest trash bin, but it
seems that when my panniers fill up, I use a lot of packing material
-- and if there are bags left over, a bag of bags on top of a piled-up
pannier serves to wedge everything down and protect items from the
pressure of the bungee cords.

--------------- side trip

It is possible to fold a plastic grocery bag so flat that it takes up
almost no space at all.

This is easier done than said; don't let the complicated instructions
scare you.

Take hold of the ends of the seam at the bottom and pull to straighten
it out. Repeat for the seams in the handles. The second step is
harder, because the handles have usually been scrunched.

Put a finger in one handle and a finger of the other hand into the
pleat at the bottom of the bag and pull. The bag will straighten out
and the pleats will re-form. Repeat on the other side.

Stroke from the bottom of the bag toward the opening to drive out the
air, then fold the bag in half lengthwise and stroke again. Fold
again and stroke again.

The average-size bag is narrow enough at this stage. Put the palm of
one hand on the bottom seam and flatten the bag with the other hand,
then fold it in half crosswise. Flatten again, fold again.

When I build a cooler, the first step is to shingle the bottom of the
pannier with bags flattened in this manner. (There are usually
already bags there from the last time, since there is no reason to
remove them when I remove the cooler.)

I put bags under my cooler so that when I wedge all of my crumpled
bags down between things, then buy one more item, I can reach up
between the wires and pull out a bag to tie the extra item to the rack
with. This would be quite impossible if the bottom of the pannier
were fine mesh like the panniers at Burlington, so . . . um . . .
delete this entire section.

--------------- /side trip


To begin the cooler, line a pannier with a plastic grocery bag, to
keep wind from blowing between the newspapers. This is akin to the
"wind shell" that used to be worn over down sweaters.

If none of your bags is large enough, line the pannier with smaller
bags that you have squashed flat, so that you can use them like small,
irregular pieces of sheet plastic. (The squashing needn't be neat;
wrinkles add insulation.) Choose white bags if you have any, to turn
the sun.

Put a bag in each corner, the straightest part even with the top wire
and the middle of the bag pressed into the corner, with the handles of
the bag straggling across the bottom of the pannier. Then arrange
more bags overlapping the first four to fill up the gaps.

Next, take a newspaper folded the way papers are in paper dispensers,
hold the fold against the top wire of one side of the pannier, and use
your other hand to force it to fold into the corner between side and
bottom. Line the other side with another newspaper.

At one time, the next step was to fold a newspaper in half, but papers
are narrower than they used to be, so fold about a third of the paper
to make it just a tiny bit wider than the end of the pannier. Place
it with the new fold in the corner and the old fold even with the top
wire, then force the rest of it to fit. This wedges the side
newspapers into place. Put another newspaper in the other end.

If the insulation isn't thick enough, add another layer of newspaper.
At the ends, line up the thin side of the new layer with the thick
side of the first layer.

If you lined the pannier with a single large bag, fold it down over
the first layer so that the second layer can hold it in place.

At first, I folded a newspaper in half and wedged it down on the floor
to hold the sides in place, then I noticed that the floor was already
at least as thick as the sides and stopped doing that.

Now line the completed cooler with another plastic bag; since the
inside measurements are now smaller, odds are you have one that's big
enough. This helps to keep the newspapers dry, and also allows you to
carry everything you packed into the cooler into the house in one
trip.

After filling the cooler, fold the lining bag over the contents and
put in a newspaper folded in half as a lid. Then use your bag of
crumpled bags to fill up the pannier, and use two bungees to hold it
down. (The space between the newspaper lid and the bag of crumpled
bags is a good place to stash things you want kept out of the sun, but
not chilled.)

To make a bungee lid on a wire pannier, put the ends of the bungees
through the wires from the inside out, one bungee end on each side of
the hinge wires of the pannier end, just below the top wire, so that
the bungee is held by its middle and both ends dangle outside the
pannier. Bring the hooks up over the top wire and hook them to the
other end. Repeat with the other bungee at the other end.

If the bungee is too long, span more than one wire. If you pile up
more stuff than the bungees can stretch over, hook two of the hooks to
each other, so that three strands of bungee make a Z.


I wonder, why not make a Styrofoam box to carry on the bike? I'm sure
that you can buy sheet Styrofoam and either contact cement or epoxy
glue will hold it together nicely. Admittedly it does take a little
forethought to be sure that you have it when you need it, but with a
little care it should last for years.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #290  
Old September 7th 15, 02:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: A newspaper cooler

On Sun, 06 Sep 2015 17:54:24 +0100, Phil W Lee
wrote:

John B. considered Sun, 06 Sep 2015 18:12:54
+0700 the perfect time to write:

On Sun, 06 Sep 2015 01:05:47 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


When I was at the Burlington Bike Shop between Nappanee and Bremen, I
saw folding wire panniers just like mine except that the bottom panel
is the currently-fashionable perforated sheet metal instead of wires.
This leads me to think that there might be people who can use my
method of making a cooler out of newspaper.

Folding wire panniers were originally designed to fit standard paper
grocery bags. By happy chance, this makes them fit standard
newspapers, so all you need to make one into a cooler are newspapers
and plastic grocery bags.

The description is written for very thin newspapers; if your paper is
thick, you may need to use sections instead of whole papers.

Being a serious cyclist, I always carry a bag of crumpled grocery bags
to use as packing material when I buy something fragile. When I
started doing that, I figured that every now and again the bags would
get in my way and I'd toss them into the nearest trash bin, but it
seems that when my panniers fill up, I use a lot of packing material
-- and if there are bags left over, a bag of bags on top of a piled-up
pannier serves to wedge everything down and protect items from the
pressure of the bungee cords.

--------------- side trip

It is possible to fold a plastic grocery bag so flat that it takes up
almost no space at all.

This is easier done than said; don't let the complicated instructions
scare you.

Take hold of the ends of the seam at the bottom and pull to straighten
it out. Repeat for the seams in the handles. The second step is
harder, because the handles have usually been scrunched.

Put a finger in one handle and a finger of the other hand into the
pleat at the bottom of the bag and pull. The bag will straighten out
and the pleats will re-form. Repeat on the other side.

Stroke from the bottom of the bag toward the opening to drive out the
air, then fold the bag in half lengthwise and stroke again. Fold
again and stroke again.

The average-size bag is narrow enough at this stage. Put the palm of
one hand on the bottom seam and flatten the bag with the other hand,
then fold it in half crosswise. Flatten again, fold again.

When I build a cooler, the first step is to shingle the bottom of the
pannier with bags flattened in this manner. (There are usually
already bags there from the last time, since there is no reason to
remove them when I remove the cooler.)

I put bags under my cooler so that when I wedge all of my crumpled
bags down between things, then buy one more item, I can reach up
between the wires and pull out a bag to tie the extra item to the rack
with. This would be quite impossible if the bottom of the pannier
were fine mesh like the panniers at Burlington, so . . . um . . .
delete this entire section.

--------------- /side trip


To begin the cooler, line a pannier with a plastic grocery bag, to
keep wind from blowing between the newspapers. This is akin to the
"wind shell" that used to be worn over down sweaters.

If none of your bags is large enough, line the pannier with smaller
bags that you have squashed flat, so that you can use them like small,
irregular pieces of sheet plastic. (The squashing needn't be neat;
wrinkles add insulation.) Choose white bags if you have any, to turn
the sun.

Put a bag in each corner, the straightest part even with the top wire
and the middle of the bag pressed into the corner, with the handles of
the bag straggling across the bottom of the pannier. Then arrange
more bags overlapping the first four to fill up the gaps.

Next, take a newspaper folded the way papers are in paper dispensers,
hold the fold against the top wire of one side of the pannier, and use
your other hand to force it to fold into the corner between side and
bottom. Line the other side with another newspaper.

At one time, the next step was to fold a newspaper in half, but papers
are narrower than they used to be, so fold about a third of the paper
to make it just a tiny bit wider than the end of the pannier. Place
it with the new fold in the corner and the old fold even with the top
wire, then force the rest of it to fit. This wedges the side
newspapers into place. Put another newspaper in the other end.

If the insulation isn't thick enough, add another layer of newspaper.
At the ends, line up the thin side of the new layer with the thick
side of the first layer.

If you lined the pannier with a single large bag, fold it down over
the first layer so that the second layer can hold it in place.

At first, I folded a newspaper in half and wedged it down on the floor
to hold the sides in place, then I noticed that the floor was already
at least as thick as the sides and stopped doing that.

Now line the completed cooler with another plastic bag; since the
inside measurements are now smaller, odds are you have one that's big
enough. This helps to keep the newspapers dry, and also allows you to
carry everything you packed into the cooler into the house in one
trip.

After filling the cooler, fold the lining bag over the contents and
put in a newspaper folded in half as a lid. Then use your bag of
crumpled bags to fill up the pannier, and use two bungees to hold it
down. (The space between the newspaper lid and the bag of crumpled
bags is a good place to stash things you want kept out of the sun, but
not chilled.)

To make a bungee lid on a wire pannier, put the ends of the bungees
through the wires from the inside out, one bungee end on each side of
the hinge wires of the pannier end, just below the top wire, so that
the bungee is held by its middle and both ends dangle outside the
pannier. Bring the hooks up over the top wire and hook them to the
other end. Repeat with the other bungee at the other end.

If the bungee is too long, span more than one wire. If you pile up
more stuff than the bungees can stretch over, hook two of the hooks to
each other, so that three strands of bungee make a Z.


I wonder, why not make a Styrofoam box to carry on the bike? I'm sure
that you can buy sheet Styrofoam and either contact cement or epoxy
glue will hold it together nicely. Admittedly it does take a little
forethought to be sure that you have it when you need it, but with a
little care it should last for years.


All styrofoam can do is insulate, and it takes up space all the time,
regardless of how useful it is at that time.
Newspaper, by being simply wetted with water, will act as a
refridgerator, as the water evaporates and cools the contents. On a
moving cycle, this evaporation is enhanced, and the cooling effect is
sufficient to keep milk fresh (and butter solid) on a tour, even
without a Thermos flask.
Of course, you can only use it once or twice in that way before it
gets pretty disgusting, but as it's usually free, and using it will
only delay it's entry into the recycling system, that doesn't matter.


I wonder. Back in the "good old days" I took the "paper" daily and
always had a stack of news paper for use when to paint something or
clean the chain. Now I read the news on the computer and have to
remember to buy a paper occasionally or I can't paint.. or clean the
bike chain :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Speeding cyclist mows down elderly jogger Mrcheerful UK 10 February 13th 14 11:43 PM
Cyclist:0 Disabled granny:1 Mrcheerful[_3_] UK 1 June 13th 13 09:15 PM
Hit & run cyclist injures elderly woman on pavement John Benn UK 25 August 19th 12 09:33 AM
cyclist says injured granny should not be on pavement! Mrcheerful[_2_] UK 5 June 13th 10 07:37 PM
Cyclist hits granny in pavement crash in Brighton [email protected] UK 167 February 1st 09 11:44 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.