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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #321  
Old October 12th 15, 03:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:35:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.


For a while, there was a wire loop called a Flickstand for
immobilizing the front wheel. It worked very well, but was
incompatible with fenders and soon vanished.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
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  #322  
Old October 12th 15, 01:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 23:38:12 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:35:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.


For a while, there was a wire loop called a Flickstand for
immobilizing the front wheel. It worked very well, but was
incompatible with fenders and soon vanished.


Velo Orange sells a thing called a "wheel stabilizer" for $10 that is
supposed to keep the front wheel straight and works with a fender.
http://store.velo-orange.com/index.p...tabilizer.html

And apparently comes in different sizes to fit different down-tubes.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #323  
Old October 14th 15, 09:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,885
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On 10/11/2015 10:38 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:35:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.


For a while, there was a wire loop called a Flickstand for
immobilizing the front wheel. It worked very well, but was
incompatible with fenders and soon vanished.


I suspect a bigger reason it vanished was the demise of "standard sized
tubing." But I suppose the Flickstand could be redesigned to use a
flexible band clamp of some kind. That would allow it even on
hydroformed aluminum frames and carbon fiber frames.

To my continued bemusement, I almost never see fenders on a bike.
Almost none of the members of my bike club use fenders.

Once this year I was asked, at the last minute, to lead a regular
weeknight club ride when the listed volunteer couldn't lead it. I threw
my bike in the car (I usually ride to the start) and drove there through
a rainstorm.

As I sat in the parking lot, the sky cleared to a perfect blue. And
nobody showed up, probably because of the wet roads. I did the ride
solo, and had a fine ride.

I love fenders. They make a bike so much more practical. See
http://www.bicyclinglife.com/Practic...yofFenders.htm


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #324  
Old October 14th 15, 09:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,885
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On 10/12/2015 2:25 PM, Phil W Lee wrote:
Frank Krygowski considered Sun, 11 Oct 2015
12:35:44 -0400 the perfect time to write:

On 10/10/2015 10:24 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

It has been brought to my attention that the art of parking on a pole
is not hard-wired at birth, but must be learned.

The process is very simple. Stop near the pole, a few inches away so
that the bike will lean against the pole and its center of gravity has
to be raised a bit before it can be knocked over.

The curve of the saddle should rest against the pole. This prevents
the bike from rolling forward.

Nudge the pedal on your side with your foot until the pedal on the
pole side rests firmly against the pole. This prevents the bike from
rolling backward.

So now it can't roll, the pole prevents it from falling to one side,
and the lean prevents it from falling to the other side. The bike is
stable.

But sometimes a gust of wind (or a passing child) can give the bike
enough of a push to overcome the weight pressing against the pole.
Just to be sure, wind your cable lock around the pole and through the
frame and both wheels.

If the pole is one of a series intended for parking bikes -- wavy
pipes that provide several poles for each pair of expensive anchor
points are popular -- place your bike at right angles to the row of
poles, so that you don't block other riders from using the other
poles.

If you want the bike locked, select a pole that is very tall, has
something big at the top, or is a closed curve. (A post supporting a
roof usually meets all three criteria.)


Your subject line confused me at first.
http://www.who2.com/sites/default/fi...elly-up-28.png

When I first started "adult" cycling, my older British friend expressed
surprise about my kickstand. He said "there's always _something_ to
lean your bike against." And he showed me the pedal-on-a-curb trick: put
the curbside pedal just back of straight down, prop the pedal on the
curb and turn the front wheel against the curb. The crank acts as a
kickstand. It's not super-secure, but it works.

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.


My front brake lever on the 'bent has a push-button which locks it in
the "on" position. You just squeeze the brake lever, push the button
while releasing the lever, and the lever stays in and the brake on.
The next squeeze of the lever releases the brake-lock.
I can't see a manufacturers name or model on it, but I believe they
are fairly common on trikes, which generally have a greater need for
them. Mine is compatible with V brakes, but I'm sure whoever makes it
would be able to provide models for other braking systems if necessary
- just check with trike suppliers.


When I had just started riding my very first "ten speed" (1972 or so),
another young engineer drove to the big city to buy one for himself.
The 1970s bike boom was in full swing, and there were hundreds of new
bike shops, with more hundreds of novice bike salesmen.

My friend reported that one salesman pointed to the headset-mounted
front brake quick release on a bike
http://www.thedirtbum.com/wp-content...nger-Front.jpg
and said "It's a parking brake!" Indeed, the novice mechanic had set up
the brakes so the front wheel was locked when the QR was not open.

It's occurred to me that with certain brakes, you could install two
different QR mechanisms in series, so to speak, and use one in exactly
that way.

But I do fine with Blackburn-style brake blocks - mostly home made.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #325  
Old October 15th 15, 04:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On Wed, 14 Oct 2015 16:45:46 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 10/11/2015 10:38 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:35:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.


For a while, there was a wire loop called a Flickstand for
immobilizing the front wheel. It worked very well, but was
incompatible with fenders and soon vanished.


I suspect a bigger reason it vanished was the demise of "standard sized
tubing." But I suppose the Flickstand could be redesigned to use a
flexible band clamp of some kind. That would allow it even on
hydroformed aluminum frames and carbon fiber frames.

To my continued bemusement, I almost never see fenders on a bike.
Almost none of the members of my bike club use fenders.

Once this year I was asked, at the last minute, to lead a regular
weeknight club ride when the listed volunteer couldn't lead it. I threw
my bike in the car (I usually ride to the start) and drove there through
a rainstorm.

As I sat in the parking lot, the sky cleared to a perfect blue. And
nobody showed up, probably because of the wet roads. I did the ride
solo, and had a fine ride.

I love fenders. They make a bike so much more practical. See
http://www.bicyclinglife.com/Practic...yofFenders.htm


I also find that fenders also reduce family squabbles. The kind where
you get a fresh, clean, jersey out of the drawer and it has a big
black stripe down the back, and you hold it up for your wife's
inspection and say, "WHAT IS THIS?" :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #326  
Old October 15th 15, 04:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,885
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On 10/14/2015 11:06 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 14 Oct 2015 16:45:46 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 10/11/2015 10:38 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:35:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.

For a while, there was a wire loop called a Flickstand for
immobilizing the front wheel. It worked very well, but was
incompatible with fenders and soon vanished.


I suspect a bigger reason it vanished was the demise of "standard sized
tubing." But I suppose the Flickstand could be redesigned to use a
flexible band clamp of some kind. That would allow it even on
hydroformed aluminum frames and carbon fiber frames.

To my continued bemusement, I almost never see fenders on a bike.
Almost none of the members of my bike club use fenders.

Once this year I was asked, at the last minute, to lead a regular
weeknight club ride when the listed volunteer couldn't lead it. I threw
my bike in the car (I usually ride to the start) and drove there through
a rainstorm.

As I sat in the parking lot, the sky cleared to a perfect blue. And
nobody showed up, probably because of the wet roads. I did the ride
solo, and had a fine ride.

I love fenders. They make a bike so much more practical. See
http://www.bicyclinglife.com/Practic...yofFenders.htm


I also find that fenders also reduce family squabbles. The kind where
you get a fresh, clean, jersey out of the drawer and it has a big
black stripe down the back, and you hold it up for your wife's
inspection and say, "WHAT IS THIS?" :-)


Hmm. Maybe they should sell pre-black-striped jerseys for fenderless
riders? It might reduce those squabbles.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #327  
Old October 15th 15, 12:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Parking on a Pole

On Wed, 14 Oct 2015 23:58:12 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 10/14/2015 11:06 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 14 Oct 2015 16:45:46 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 10/11/2015 10:38 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 12:35:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Then another guy (at a LAW rally) showed me a sort of multi-step plastic
wedge he'd cut out of plexiglass. He'd squeeze the front brake lever,
then cram the wedge into the lever's opening to hold that brake on. The
front wheel was then unable to roll and the parked bike was much more
stable. Blackburn picked up the idea and sold them for a while.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5087/...71eb9ec3_o.jpg
But they're easy to make.

For a while, there was a wire loop called a Flickstand for
immobilizing the front wheel. It worked very well, but was
incompatible with fenders and soon vanished.

I suspect a bigger reason it vanished was the demise of "standard sized
tubing." But I suppose the Flickstand could be redesigned to use a
flexible band clamp of some kind. That would allow it even on
hydroformed aluminum frames and carbon fiber frames.

To my continued bemusement, I almost never see fenders on a bike.
Almost none of the members of my bike club use fenders.

Once this year I was asked, at the last minute, to lead a regular
weeknight club ride when the listed volunteer couldn't lead it. I threw
my bike in the car (I usually ride to the start) and drove there through
a rainstorm.

As I sat in the parking lot, the sky cleared to a perfect blue. And
nobody showed up, probably because of the wet roads. I did the ride
solo, and had a fine ride.

I love fenders. They make a bike so much more practical. See
http://www.bicyclinglife.com/Practic...yofFenders.htm


I also find that fenders also reduce family squabbles. The kind where
you get a fresh, clean, jersey out of the drawer and it has a big
black stripe down the back, and you hold it up for your wife's
inspection and say, "WHAT IS THIS?" :-)


Hmm. Maybe they should sell pre-black-striped jerseys for fenderless
riders? It might reduce those squabbles.


They already make black jerseys,

But who wants to wear a dull, black, colored jersey when flamboyance
is the name of the game, else bicycles would all be painted black :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #328  
Old October 18th 15, 04:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Beginners and Parked Cars


Beginners should not ride on streets where parking is allowed; there
are skills that you must master before you can safely overtake a
parked car.

Exception: if the street is one where you wouldn't be surprised to
meet a track team jogging down the middle, you may treat it as though
it were a Multi-User Path, and use it to practice giving parked cars a
wide berth.

But don't forget that Multi-User Paths require more alertness than
streets do.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #329  
Old October 25th 15, 01:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Beginners and Parking lots


A rank beginner is apt to flee from a street where cars are constantly
overtaking and meeting him into the calm safety of a parking lot --
but in a parking lot, the cars come at you from *every* direction.

Until you have a clue, get off and walk whenever you enter a parking
lot.

I'm assuming that you already know how to walk across a parking lot --
is that rash?


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #330  
Old October 25th 15, 02:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Beginners and Parking lots

On Sat, 24 Oct 2015 22:06:52 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


A rank beginner is apt to flee from a street where cars are constantly
overtaking and meeting him into the calm safety of a parking lot --
but in a parking lot, the cars come at you from *every* direction.

Until you have a clue, get off and walk whenever you enter a parking
lot.

I'm assuming that you already know how to walk across a parking lot --
is that rash?



Maybe. There a lot more people killed in "Person" - auto collisions
than "Bicycle" - Auto collisions :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

 




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