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Blue railway signals?



 
 
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  #21  
Old December 13th 18, 11:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Peeler[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 600
Default Troll-feeding Senile IDIOT Alert!

On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 22:25:30 +0000, Max Demian, an especially stupid,
notorious, troll-feeding, senile idiot, blathered



Well, when they used tungsten lamps, not many years ago. It may be just
how the daylight caught the (unlit) lens.


YOU certainly got caught in the totally ****ed up Scottish troll's net
again, senile fool! tsk
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  #22  
Old December 14th 18, 12:12 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Rod Speed
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,465
Default Blue railway signals?



"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 21:03:57 -0000, Mike Humphrey
wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote:

Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways? Can't find
any evidence on google. I'm sure whereas cars have red/amber/green,
railways always had a 4th blue light. What does it mean and why has it
disappeared from Google?


Railway signals in modern times have always had red, yellow (not
amber)


I've never been fussy enough to even notice the difference between yellow,
amber, orange. I could tell the difference if they were side by side, but
I just think of a road traffic light as either yellow or orange. I
couldn't even tell you what amber colour is compared to yellow and orange.
I don't do things like "mauve", etc. Just purple, light purple, etc.

and green. A four-aspect signal has two yellows - the sequence
approaching a stop signal goes G, YY, Y, R. There can be a number of
other indications as well as the main signal but these are almost
invariably white.


I assume this is to allow trains the longer stopping distance they require
than road vehicles.

There's a number of uses for blue and purple, but not appearing with the
R/Y/G "traffic light" signals, at least in the UK.


I might be thinking of non "traffic light" signals, or I might be thinking
of a light which was off and was just seeing the blue lens which had a
yellow light behind to make green.

If you want to look
at the full range of signs and signals, http://www.railsigns.uk/ has a
very comprehensive guide.


That's a lot for a driver to remember! At least with road signs the
symbol is meaningful.

I wonder why the red is at the bottom on rail lights and the top on
traffic lights?


Basically because when there are two ways of doing
something, you can be sure someone will do it both ways.

  #23  
Old December 14th 18, 12:23 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Fred Johnson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Blue railway signals?

On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 22:25:30 -0000, Max Demian wrote:

On 13/12/2018 19:55, Fred Johnson wrote:
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 18:02:36 -0000, Max Demian
wrote:

On 13/12/2018 16:57, Steve Walker wrote:
On 13/12/2018 16:42, Fred Johnson wrote:
Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways? Can't find
any evidence on google. I'm sure whereas cars have red/amber/green,
railways always had a 4th blue light. What does it mean and why has
it disappeared from Google?

Never heard of it.

4 (& 5)-aspect signals have always had red, green and two ambers as far
as I know.

I know that the semaphore signals had lenses that were red and blue, but
they definitely showed as red and green when lit from behind by
yellowish oil lamps at night.

The glass in green traffic signals used to look blue to me - when they
had the dual-filament tungsten lamps.


I've never seen that. What year are you referring to?


Well, when they used tungsten lamps, not many years ago. It may be just
how the daylight caught the (unlit) lens.


Could be, never seen it myself, but then colour is subjective.
  #24  
Old December 14th 18, 12:25 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Fred Johnson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Blue railway signals?

On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 23:12:50 -0000, Rod Speed wrote:



"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 21:03:57 -0000, Mike Humphrey
wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote:

Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways? Can't find
any evidence on google. I'm sure whereas cars have red/amber/green,
railways always had a 4th blue light. What does it mean and why has it
disappeared from Google?

Railway signals in modern times have always had red, yellow (not
amber)


I've never been fussy enough to even notice the difference between yellow,
amber, orange. I could tell the difference if they were side by side, but
I just think of a road traffic light as either yellow or orange. I
couldn't even tell you what amber colour is compared to yellow and orange.
I don't do things like "mauve", etc. Just purple, light purple, etc.

and green. A four-aspect signal has two yellows - the sequence
approaching a stop signal goes G, YY, Y, R. There can be a number of
other indications as well as the main signal but these are almost
invariably white.


I assume this is to allow trains the longer stopping distance they require
than road vehicles.

There's a number of uses for blue and purple, but not appearing with the
R/Y/G "traffic light" signals, at least in the UK.


I might be thinking of non "traffic light" signals, or I might be thinking
of a light which was off and was just seeing the blue lens which had a
yellow light behind to make green.

If you want to look
at the full range of signs and signals, http://www.railsigns.uk/ has a
very comprehensive guide.


That's a lot for a driver to remember! At least with road signs the
symbol is meaningful.

I wonder why the red is at the bottom on rail lights and the top on
traffic lights?


Basically because when there are two ways of doing
something, you can be sure someone will do it both ways.


Like my bloody French car which has the wiper switch going down to increase speed. Never had any other car that way round. Every time I try to turn on the wipers, I'm pushing it the wrong way. One day I'll snap it off.
  #25  
Old December 14th 18, 12:27 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Peeler[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 600
Default Lonely Psychotic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert! LOL

On Fri, 14 Dec 2018 10:12:50 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rot Speed,
the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:


Basically because when there are two ways of doing
something, you can be sure someone will do it both ways.


F'up to alt.idiots where ALL your sick **** belongs.

--
FredXX to Rot Speed:
"You are still an idiot and an embarrassment to your country. No wonder
we shippe the likes of you out of the British Isles. Perhaps stupidity
and criminality is inherited after all?"
Message-ID:
  #26  
Old December 14th 18, 12:43 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Rod Speed
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,465
Default Blue railway signals?



"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 23:12:50 -0000, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 21:03:57 -0000, Mike Humphrey
wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote:

Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways? Can't find
any evidence on google. I'm sure whereas cars have red/amber/green,
railways always had a 4th blue light. What does it mean and why has
it
disappeared from Google?

Railway signals in modern times have always had red, yellow (not
amber)

I've never been fussy enough to even notice the difference between
yellow,
amber, orange. I could tell the difference if they were side by side,
but
I just think of a road traffic light as either yellow or orange. I
couldn't even tell you what amber colour is compared to yellow and
orange.
I don't do things like "mauve", etc. Just purple, light purple, etc.

and green. A four-aspect signal has two yellows - the sequence
approaching a stop signal goes G, YY, Y, R. There can be a number of
other indications as well as the main signal but these are almost
invariably white.

I assume this is to allow trains the longer stopping distance they
require
than road vehicles.

There's a number of uses for blue and purple, but not appearing with
the
R/Y/G "traffic light" signals, at least in the UK.

I might be thinking of non "traffic light" signals, or I might be
thinking
of a light which was off and was just seeing the blue lens which had a
yellow light behind to make green.

If you want to look
at the full range of signs and signals, http://www.railsigns.uk/ has a
very comprehensive guide.

That's a lot for a driver to remember! At least with road signs the
symbol is meaningful.

I wonder why the red is at the bottom on rail lights and the top on
traffic lights?


Basically because when there are two ways of doing
something, you can be sure someone will do it both ways.


Like my bloody French car which has the wiper switch going down to
increase speed.


And with light and power switches in houses etc.

And then some bugger shows up who decides to do
them sideways so there is no confusion at all, and we
end up with 4 different ways of doing it instead of just 2.

And with whether hot and cold taps have the
hot one on the right of the pair or the left.

Never had any other car that way round.


Yeah, the frogs are much worse for that than most.

Every time I try to turn on the wipers, I'm pushing it the wrong way. One
day I'll snap it off.


  #27  
Old December 14th 18, 01:00 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Peeler[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 600
Default Lonely Psychotic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert! LOL

On Fri, 14 Dec 2018 10:43:41 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rot Speed,
the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the two abnormal idiots' endless sick ****

....and f'up to alt.idiots

--
Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp about senile cretin Rot Speed:
"Thick pillock!"
MID:
  #28  
Old December 14th 18, 01:20 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Fred Johnson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Blue railway signals?

On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 23:43:41 -0000, Rod Speed wrote:



"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 23:12:50 -0000, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 21:03:57 -0000, Mike Humphrey
wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote:

Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways? Can't find
any evidence on google. I'm sure whereas cars have red/amber/green,
railways always had a 4th blue light. What does it mean and why has
it
disappeared from Google?

Railway signals in modern times have always had red, yellow (not
amber)

I've never been fussy enough to even notice the difference between
yellow,
amber, orange. I could tell the difference if they were side by side,
but
I just think of a road traffic light as either yellow or orange. I
couldn't even tell you what amber colour is compared to yellow and
orange.
I don't do things like "mauve", etc. Just purple, light purple, etc.

and green. A four-aspect signal has two yellows - the sequence
approaching a stop signal goes G, YY, Y, R. There can be a number of
other indications as well as the main signal but these are almost
invariably white.

I assume this is to allow trains the longer stopping distance they
require
than road vehicles.

There's a number of uses for blue and purple, but not appearing with
the
R/Y/G "traffic light" signals, at least in the UK.

I might be thinking of non "traffic light" signals, or I might be
thinking
of a light which was off and was just seeing the blue lens which had a
yellow light behind to make green.

If you want to look
at the full range of signs and signals, http://www.railsigns.uk/ has a
very comprehensive guide.

That's a lot for a driver to remember! At least with road signs the
symbol is meaningful.

I wonder why the red is at the bottom on rail lights and the top on
traffic lights?

Basically because when there are two ways of doing
something, you can be sure someone will do it both ways.


Like my bloody French car which has the wiper switch going down to
increase speed.


And with light and power switches in houses etc.


Down should always be on (except two or more way switches of course).

And then some bugger shows up who decides to do
them sideways so there is no confusion at all, and we
end up with 4 different ways of doing it instead of just 2.


Never seen a sideways lightswitch in a house.

Anyway with automatic ones, there are no switches.

And with whether hot and cold taps have the
hot one on the right of the pair or the left.


I can never remember which way round mine are, until I go to use one. Because when I use one in another house that's the other way round, I always get it wrong.

Never had any other car that way round.


Yeah, the frogs are much worse for that than most.


They even speak backwards, putting the noun before the adjective.

Every time I try to turn on the wipers, I'm pushing it the wrong way. One
day I'll snap it off.

  #29  
Old December 14th 18, 01:38 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Steve Walker[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Blue railway signals?

On 13/12/2018 19:40, Fred Johnson wrote:
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 17:40:20 -0000, Rod Speed
wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote

Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways?
Can't find any evidence on google.* I'm sure whereas cars
have red/amber/green, railways always had a 4th blue light.
What does it mean


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railwa...nal#Components

and why has it disappeared from Google?


It hasn't.


Blue lights are not mentioned in that link.

BTW, something in the link reminded me of a local accident where the
railways had managed to install an overhead gantry of some sort
obstructing the view of some lights, so the driver didn't stop.
M'colleague took some photos from the driver's cabin of another train as
it went on the same route and proved his innocence (as part of his
psychology work I think).* There's something wrong in the world when a
3rd party has to prove your innocence.


The Ladbroke Grove rail crash, signal SN109?

SteveW


  #30  
Old December 14th 18, 01:47 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling
Steve Walker[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Blue railway signals?

On 13/12/2018 23:12, Rod Speed wrote:


"Fred Johnson" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 13 Dec 2018 21:03:57 -0000, Mike Humphrey
wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote:

Can anybody else remember blue traffic lights on railways?* Can't
find any evidence on google.* I'm sure whereas cars have
red/amber/green, railways always had a 4th blue light.* What does it
mean and why has it disappeared from Google?

Railway signals in modern times have always had red, yellow (not
amber)


I've never been fussy enough to even notice the difference between
yellow, amber, orange.* I could tell the difference if they were side
by side, but I just think of a road traffic light as either yellow or
orange.* I couldn't even tell you what amber colour is compared to
yellow and orange. I don't do things like "mauve", etc.* Just purple,
light purple, etc.

and green. A four-aspect signal has two yellows - the sequence
approaching a stop signal goes G, YY, Y, R. There can be a number of
other indications as well as the main signal but these are almost
invariably white.


I assume this is to allow trains the longer stopping distance they
require than road vehicles.

There's a number of uses for blue and purple, but not appearing with the
R/Y/G "traffic light" signals, at least in the UK.


I might be thinking of non "traffic light" signals, or I might be
thinking of a light which was off and was just seeing the blue lens
which had a yellow light behind to make green.

If you want to look
at the full range of signs and signals, http://www.railsigns.uk/ has a
very comprehensive guide.


That's a lot for a driver to remember!* At least with road signs the
symbol is meaningful.

I wonder why the red is at the bottom on rail lights and the top on
traffic lights?


Basically because when there are two ways of doing
something, you can be sure someone will do it both ways.


I am sure that I remember reading that it was based upon upper-quadrant
semaphore signalling, where a raised signal was "off" (clear) and
horizontal one was "on" (danger). Although both upper and lower quadrant
signals were used in the UK, they were almost all UQ (except on GWR
lines) from the 1920s - with the advantage that broken cables or heavy
snow caused them to drop to danger rather than the clear of LQ ones.
They simply copied UQ practice, so the top was clear and the bottom danger.

SteveW
 




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