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  #21  
Old January 9th 19, 12:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 307
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:22:50 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 4:09:42 PM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:


That wasn't the part that was wrong. Tom needs to learn cloud types if
he's going to talk about them.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Tell me Frank - what is the difference between a cumulus and an
altocumulus. Or is this another of your juvenile typo bull****?


Here you are;
https://www.thoughtco.com/types-of-c...he-sky-4025569
Ads
  #22  
Old January 9th 19, 01:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On 1/8/2019 5:35 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
rOn Tue, 8 Jan 2019 10:15:18 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 11:16:53 AM UTC-8, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 07 Jan 2019 09:06:37 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 7:04:24 PM UTC-8, news18 wrote:
On Sun, 06 Jan 2019 07:00:36 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

So, no you weren't aware and need a reference but yes you were aware.
I am never surprised by your statements.

Most people who know even a lttle bit about "cloud seeding" will know
that claiming it affected the weather was at best a dubious long shot.
Somewhere around there is a apaper showeing that "rain dances" have a
greater correlation to the claim of "afffecting the weather".

It is not in the least "dubious" and was actually used by the CIA in the
Vietnam war to mire the North Vietnamese and Cambodians down in mud and
mire. There's no questioned that it worked. There is also no question
that NASA has used cloud seeding to eliminate clouds in order to have
clear weather for space launches.

Yawn, if you cloud seed in an area and time when it s going to rain
naturally, then you can hardly "cloud seeding worked".

Contrails have been blamed for large scale cooling along flight paths
which are growing more and more numerous. These contrails are nothing
more than cumulous clouds. At any moment in the USA there are 3,000
aircraft in the air. And they use the dirtiest of fuel.

And dirty fuel emits particles that water vapour coalesces about. So your
point is?


Of course you can't make blue sky rain. But they could make it rain in places where they wanted the rain to fall when it would normally be falling in
Thailand. Laos and Cambodia would receive the rain so that the

north Vietnamese couldn't travel down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. This
prevented attacks from the back side of the dividing line. This ALL
worked. In fact North Vietnam admitted that they were beaten. But
after Lyndon Johnson pulled American Troops out of South Vietnam he
cut all military aid to the South and that gave the North the
advantage again.


Quite simply, you don't know what you are talking about. Firstly, the
so called "Ho Chi Minh Trail" wasn't a "trail" it was a series of
paths, roads and byways, some with considerable improvement including
camp facilities that allowed the Northerners to transport supplies to
their troops in the south using trucks, bicycles, water buffalos, and
human porters.

The idea that "if it rains that won't be able to use the trail" is one
of the more stupid ideas that the U.S. had during the war. The idea
that all movement stops during the monsoon is ludicrous. It would mean
that nothing moved in most of South East Asia for nearly half of each
year.

And proof? Well, I guess that the fact that the North did supply their
people in the South all year round is proof, isn't it? And, even
General Westmoreland stated that he thought there was "no appreciable
increase" in rain from the project.

As for N. Vietnam admitting that they were beaten? I guess you'll have
to prove that as it appears to be just another one of your pipe
dreams.

I might add that Thailand has since about 1969 has had an official
"cloud seeding" project. The results vary from year to year but
overall the project has not been a resounding success, other than as a
political act to demonstrate the "government's concern" for the
farmers.



The Soviets gave that a good go but ended up draining the
Aral Sea instead.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #23  
Old January 9th 19, 03:11 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,973
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On 1/8/2019 7:53 PM, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:22:50 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 4:09:42 PM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:


That wasn't the part that was wrong. Tom needs to learn cloud types if
he's going to talk about them.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Tell me Frank - what is the difference between a cumulus and an
altocumulus. Or is this another of your juvenile typo bull****?


Here you are;
https://www.thoughtco.com/types-of-c...he-sky-4025569


Following the shift in topic (hey, it's Usenet!):

Way back when I was in college and had no money, I found a beautiful
little book in the library: _Instant Weather Forecasting_ by Alan Watts.
Along with some excellent fundamentals on weather, its main feature was
pages of photos of various cloud types, with explanations of what
phenomena generated the clouds and what sort of weather might be expected.

I couldn't afford to buy it, but I borrowed it from the library over and
over. I hoped to learn its principles and use them on long tours. I
envisioned riding across America and being expert with my choices of
route and shelter.

Well, I never became really expert, although I tried. And by the time I
actually did ride across America, it made a lot more sense to just look
at the weather channel whenever I got the chance.

These days, I can just call up a weather map on my phone (as I did
today) and see "Holy cow, we'd better head for home right now!"

The young whippersnappers have it so easy!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #24  
Old January 9th 19, 03:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,309
Default More Justice Department Hiding

Frank Krygowski wrote:

:These days, I can just call up a weather map on my phone (as I did
:today) and see "Holy cow, we'd better head for home right now!"

:The young whippersnappers have it so easy!

Ask Andrew about the Armistice day blizzard...

--
Truth is in your water heater.
  #25  
Old January 9th 19, 02:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On 1/8/2019 9:11 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/8/2019 7:53 PM, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:22:50 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 4:09:42 PM UTC-8, Frank
Krygowski wrote:


That wasn't the part that was wrong. Tom needs to learn
cloud types if
he's going to talk about them.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Tell me Frank - what is the difference between a cumulus
and an
altocumulus. Or is this another of your juvenile typo
bull****?


Here you are;
https://www.thoughtco.com/types-of-c...he-sky-4025569


Following the shift in topic (hey, it's Usenet!):

Way back when I was in college and had no money, I found a
beautiful little book in the library: _Instant Weather
Forecasting_ by Alan Watts. Along with some excellent
fundamentals on weather, its main feature was pages of
photos of various cloud types, with explanations of what
phenomena generated the clouds and what sort of weather
might be expected.

I couldn't afford to buy it, but I borrowed it from the
library over and over. I hoped to learn its principles and
use them on long tours. I envisioned riding across America
and being expert with my choices of route and shelter.

Well, I never became really expert, although I tried. And by
the time I actually did ride across America, it made a lot
more sense to just look at the weather channel whenever I
got the chance.

These days, I can just call up a weather map on my phone (as
I did today) and see "Holy cow, we'd better head for home
right now!"

The young whippersnappers have it so easy!


Alan Watts the Zen philosopher? Huh didn't know that.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #26  
Old January 9th 19, 02:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On 1/8/2019 9:21 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:

:These days, I can just call up a weather map on my phone (as I did
:today) and see "Holy cow, we'd better head for home right now!"

:The young whippersnappers have it so easy!

Ask Andrew about the Armistice day blizzard...


I knew men who lived through it.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #27  
Old January 9th 19, 04:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,973
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On 1/9/2019 9:32 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/8/2019 9:11 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/8/2019 7:53 PM, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:22:50 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 4:09:42 PM UTC-8, Frank
Krygowski wrote:

That wasn't the part that was wrong. Tom needs to learn
cloud types if
he's going to talk about them.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Tell me Frank - what is the difference between a cumulus
and an
altocumulus. Or is this another of your juvenile typo
bull****?

Here you are;
https://www.thoughtco.com/types-of-c...he-sky-4025569


Following the shift in topic (hey, it's Usenet!):

Way back when I was in college and had no money, I found a
beautiful little book in the library: _Instant Weather
Forecasting_ by Alan Watts. Along with some excellent
fundamentals on weather, its main feature was pages of
photos of various cloud types, with explanations of what
phenomena generated the clouds and what sort of weather
might be expected.

I couldn't afford to buy it, but I borrowed it from the
library over and over. I hoped to learn its principles and
use them on long tours. I envisioned riding across America
and being expert with my choices of route and shelter.

Well, I never became really expert, although I tried. And by
the time I actually did ride across America, it made a lot
more sense to just look at the weather channel whenever I
got the chance.

These days, I can just call up a weather map on my phone (as
I did today) and see "Holy cow, we'd better head for home
right now!"

The young whippersnappers have it so easy!


Alan Watts the Zen philosopher? Huh didn't know that.


I'm sure it's a different Alan Watts. This guy was a meteorologist who
was also writing a physics textbook when he wrote _Instant Weather
Forecasting_.

I suspect the other Alan Watts would just say "The weather is what the
weather is."

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #28  
Old January 9th 19, 04:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On 1/9/2019 10:51 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/9/2019 9:32 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/8/2019 9:11 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/8/2019 7:53 PM, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:22:50 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 4:09:42 PM UTC-8, Frank
Krygowski wrote:

That wasn't the part that was wrong. Tom needs to learn
cloud types if
he's going to talk about them.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Tell me Frank - what is the difference between a cumulus
and an
altocumulus. Or is this another of your juvenile typo
bull****?

Here you are;
https://www.thoughtco.com/types-of-c...he-sky-4025569



Following the shift in topic (hey, it's Usenet!):

Way back when I was in college and had no money, I found a
beautiful little book in the library: _Instant Weather
Forecasting_ by Alan Watts. Along with some excellent
fundamentals on weather, its main feature was pages of
photos of various cloud types, with explanations of what
phenomena generated the clouds and what sort of weather
might be expected.

I couldn't afford to buy it, but I borrowed it from the
library over and over. I hoped to learn its principles and
use them on long tours. I envisioned riding across America
and being expert with my choices of route and shelter.

Well, I never became really expert, although I tried. And by
the time I actually did ride across America, it made a lot
more sense to just look at the weather channel whenever I
got the chance.

These days, I can just call up a weather map on my phone (as
I did today) and see "Holy cow, we'd better head for home
right now!"

The young whippersnappers have it so easy!


Alan Watts the Zen philosopher? Huh didn't know that.


I'm sure it's a different Alan Watts. This guy was a
meteorologist who was also writing a physics textbook when
he wrote _Instant Weather Forecasting_.

I suspect the other Alan Watts would just say "The weather
is what the weather is."


That works for me.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #29  
Old January 10th 19, 08:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,202
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 3:35:22 PM UTC-8, John B. Slocomb wrote:
rOn Tue, 8 Jan 2019 10:15:18 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 11:16:53 AM UTC-8, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 07 Jan 2019 09:06:37 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 7:04:24 PM UTC-8, news18 wrote:
On Sun, 06 Jan 2019 07:00:36 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

So, no you weren't aware and need a reference but yes you were aware.
I am never surprised by your statements.

Most people who know even a lttle bit about "cloud seeding" will know
that claiming it affected the weather was at best a dubious long shot.
Somewhere around there is a apaper showeing that "rain dances" have a
greater correlation to the claim of "afffecting the weather".

It is not in the least "dubious" and was actually used by the CIA in the
Vietnam war to mire the North Vietnamese and Cambodians down in mud and
mire. There's no questioned that it worked. There is also no question
that NASA has used cloud seeding to eliminate clouds in order to have
clear weather for space launches.

Yawn, if you cloud seed in an area and time when it s going to rain
naturally, then you can hardly "cloud seeding worked".

Contrails have been blamed for large scale cooling along flight paths
which are growing more and more numerous. These contrails are nothing
more than cumulous clouds. At any moment in the USA there are 3,000
aircraft in the air. And they use the dirtiest of fuel.

And dirty fuel emits particles that water vapour coalesces about. So your
point is?


Of course you can't make blue sky rain. But they could make it rain in places where they wanted the rain to fall when it would normally be falling in
Thailand. Laos and Cambodia would receive the rain so that the

north Vietnamese couldn't travel down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. This
prevented attacks from the back side of the dividing line. This ALL
worked. In fact North Vietnam admitted that they were beaten. But
after Lyndon Johnson pulled American Troops out of South Vietnam he
cut all military aid to the South and that gave the North the
advantage again.


Quite simply, you don't know what you are talking about. Firstly, the
so called "Ho Chi Minh Trail" wasn't a "trail" it was a series of
paths, roads and byways, some with considerable improvement including
camp facilities that allowed the Northerners to transport supplies to
their troops in the south using trucks, bicycles, water buffalos, and
human porters.

The idea that "if it rains that won't be able to use the trail" is one
of the more stupid ideas that the U.S. had during the war. The idea
that all movement stops during the monsoon is ludicrous. It would mean
that nothing moved in most of South East Asia for nearly half of each
year.

And proof? Well, I guess that the fact that the North did supply their
people in the South all year round is proof, isn't it? And, even
General Westmoreland stated that he thought there was "no appreciable
increase" in rain from the project.

As for N. Vietnam admitting that they were beaten? I guess you'll have
to prove that as it appears to be just another one of your pipe
dreams.

I might add that Thailand has since about 1969 has had an official
"cloud seeding" project. The results vary from year to year but
overall the project has not been a resounding success, other than as a
political act to demonstrate the "government's concern" for the
farmers.


Firstly there were no "road improvements" that anyone in the US would call an improvement - muddy car tracks over a dozen miles are what they were.

Secondly you can't "increase" the amounts of rain by seeding but only have it occur in other areas than it would have fallen.

Thirdly the North Vietnamese surrendered at the Paris Peace Treaty and then because the Democrats wouldn't continue to support the South Vietnamese military and continue air support the North Vietnamese simply ignored the Treaty and the Democrats used that as an election point.
  #30  
Old January 10th 19, 09:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,769
Default More Justice Department Hiding

On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 12:41:10 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 3:35:22 PM UTC-8, John B. Slocomb wrote:
rOn Tue, 8 Jan 2019 10:15:18 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Monday, January 7, 2019 at 11:16:53 AM UTC-8, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 07 Jan 2019 09:06:37 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

On Sunday, January 6, 2019 at 7:04:24 PM UTC-8, news18 wrote:
On Sun, 06 Jan 2019 07:00:36 -0800, sltom992 wrote:

So, no you weren't aware and need a reference but yes you were aware.
I am never surprised by your statements.

Most people who know even a lttle bit about "cloud seeding" will know
that claiming it affected the weather was at best a dubious long shot.
Somewhere around there is a apaper showeing that "rain dances" have a
greater correlation to the claim of "afffecting the weather".

It is not in the least "dubious" and was actually used by the CIA in the
Vietnam war to mire the North Vietnamese and Cambodians down in mud and
mire. There's no questioned that it worked. There is also no question
that NASA has used cloud seeding to eliminate clouds in order to have
clear weather for space launches.

Yawn, if you cloud seed in an area and time when it s going to rain
naturally, then you can hardly "cloud seeding worked".

Contrails have been blamed for large scale cooling along flight paths
which are growing more and more numerous. These contrails are nothing
more than cumulous clouds. At any moment in the USA there are 3,000
aircraft in the air. And they use the dirtiest of fuel.

And dirty fuel emits particles that water vapour coalesces about. So your
point is?

Of course you can't make blue sky rain. But they could make it rain in places where they wanted the rain to fall when it would normally be falling in
Thailand. Laos and Cambodia would receive the rain so that the

north Vietnamese couldn't travel down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. This
prevented attacks from the back side of the dividing line. This ALL
worked. In fact North Vietnam admitted that they were beaten. But
after Lyndon Johnson pulled American Troops out of South Vietnam he
cut all military aid to the South and that gave the North the
advantage again.


Quite simply, you don't know what you are talking about. Firstly, the
so called "Ho Chi Minh Trail" wasn't a "trail" it was a series of
paths, roads and byways, some with considerable improvement including
camp facilities that allowed the Northerners to transport supplies to
their troops in the south using trucks, bicycles, water buffalos, and
human porters.

The idea that "if it rains that won't be able to use the trail" is one
of the more stupid ideas that the U.S. had during the war. The idea
that all movement stops during the monsoon is ludicrous. It would mean
that nothing moved in most of South East Asia for nearly half of each
year.

And proof? Well, I guess that the fact that the North did supply their
people in the South all year round is proof, isn't it? And, even
General Westmoreland stated that he thought there was "no appreciable
increase" in rain from the project.

As for N. Vietnam admitting that they were beaten? I guess you'll have
to prove that as it appears to be just another one of your pipe
dreams.

I might add that Thailand has since about 1969 has had an official
"cloud seeding" project. The results vary from year to year but
overall the project has not been a resounding success, other than as a
political act to demonstrate the "government's concern" for the
farmers.


Firstly there were no "road improvements" that anyone in the US would call an improvement - muddy car tracks over a dozen miles are what they were.

Secondly you can't "increase" the amounts of rain by seeding but only have it occur in other areas than it would have fallen.

Thirdly the North Vietnamese surrendered at the Paris Peace Treaty and then because the Democrats wouldn't continue to support the South Vietnamese military and continue air support the North Vietnamese simply ignored the Treaty and the Democrats used that as an election point.


Wow! North Viet Nam surrendered? Who knew? BTW, to whom did they surrender?

-- Jay Beattie.

 




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