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Build it and ... why aren't they coming?



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 3rd 19, 08:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,973
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.


Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly. If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it was winter in the Midwest.


It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #22  
Old January 3rd 19, 10:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 168
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 6:24 AM, Roger Merriman wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ms/2319972002/

- Frank Krygowski


How well connected are they? My commute to work has some fairly old and
narrow cycle paths built alongside the by pass, most of the time I don’t
see another cyclist as for most part. It makes sense for me but very few
others.


How well connected are they? Given that we're discussing locations
spanning the country, I'd say some are well connected and some are not,
just as they have been for many years.

To me, the significant point is this: For years, organizations who
promote segregated facilities have trumpeted increases in bike mode
share wherever they've been able to find them; and they've said "See?
The increase was because of the bike lanes!" and/or "We'll see even more
increases if we build more bike lanes..." ... or cycle tracks, or linear
parks, or whatever.

That propaganda ignored many, many places that built new bike lanes and
saw no increases in bike use. That also ignored places like San
Francisco that saw very large increases in bike use without building any
new bike facilities.
http://www.sfweekly.com/news/ironica...ycling-in-s-f/

I think there's much more to it. Bike mode share is governed by many
factors, and segregated facilities are usually only a small contributor.
Gas prices probably make a difference. Weather makes a difference. The
general economy makes a difference. Traffic congestion, if extreme
(think NYC) can make a difference. But I think fashion makes the biggest
difference of all. If it becomes trendy to bike, more people will bike
because it's trendy.

I think bike lanes, etc. can bump that a bit, but not because they make
bicycling safer or more practical. They simply function as a sort of
advertisement for bicycling. When they're new, some people will for the
first time in a long time think "Hmm. Bicycling." Then they may see a
few people riding in a bike lane and think "Hmm. I could do that."
Repeat often enough and they may try it, and numbers go up.

But most will not love it. They'll say "I got all sweaty" or "I got a
flat tire" or just "It's easier in the car." And trendiness is short
lived. When the "new and cool" wears off, people just fall back into
their normal habits.

The people whose jobs depend on new bike facilities - everyone at the
League of American Bicyclists, at People for Bikes (nee Bikes Belong),
at Toole Design Group etc. - will either ignore the drops in bike mode
share, or (more likely) say "See? We need MORE bike lanes!"

But those of us who love to ride will ride. Those who have no
alternative will ride. Those who are sucked in by trends will move on to
the next trend. Maybe ear tattoos?

It most definitely has in places increased in number but also in type, ie
not just the road warrior. For example get kids and what not, on the London
Embankment which was only really good for road warriors before, arguably
less good for them now, as it’s busier and less room to move etc.

Equally there are places with places with bike lanes that are desperately
under used, my commute for example, some may be how well it connects to
places, my commute is a by pass which is fine for me, others it doesn’t
make sense.

And yes there are routes that have had a bit of paint slapped on the road,
where the increased numbers was arriving anyway.

Roger Merriman

  #23  
Old January 3rd 19, 11:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,426
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.


Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly. If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it was winter in the Midwest.


It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski


Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when its 33-34-35 degrees.. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and February. So its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I suspect all the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans and lakes to heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the water is in the air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or snow. And it seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too. More evidence of global warming.
  #24  
Old January 3rd 19, 11:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,206
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where
there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below
zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.

Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in
more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of
the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s
or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow
two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around
for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours
and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a
few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly.
If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it
was winter in the Midwest.


It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski


Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when its 33-34-35
degrees. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and February. So
its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I suspect all
the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans and lakes to
heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the water is in the
air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or snow. And it
seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too. More evidence
of global warming.


On the other hand, 2018 saw the fewest (total) deaths from tornadoes in
the US since 1875.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/n...est-since-1875

Italy seems to have had an unusual number, however.

Must be global warming.

--
  #25  
Old January 4th 19, 12:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,973
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On 1/3/2019 6:52 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where
there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below
zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.

Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in
more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of
the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s
or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow
two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around
for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours
and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a
few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly.
If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it
was winter in the Midwest.

It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski


Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when its 33-34-35
degrees. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and February. So
its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I suspect all
the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans and lakes to
heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the water is in the
air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or snow. And it
seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too. More evidence
of global warming.


On the other hand, 2018 saw the fewest (total) deaths from tornadoes in
the US since 1875.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/n...est-since-1875

Italy seems to have had an unusual number, however.

Must be global warming.


Inherently rare events like hurricanes and, I suppose, tornado deaths
will always show a lot of random fluctuations. (The same is true of
bicycling fatalities.) I don't think those fluctuations can necessarily
be used to prove any particular cause.

But long term changes in common and ordinary data are more likely to
mean something is happening.

Long before most of the discussion on climate change, I came across an
article discussing data a historian noted in diaries of British farmers.
Farmers were diligent about recording the dates of the last frost, and
those dates had been consistently creeping earlier for many decades. To
me, that indicates a real trend with a real cause.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #26  
Old January 4th 19, 01:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,206
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

Frank Krygowski writes:

On 1/3/2019 6:52 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where
there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below
zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.

Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in
more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of
the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s
or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow
two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around
for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours
and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a
few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly.
If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it
was winter in the Midwest.

It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when its 33-34-35
degrees. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and February. So
its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I suspect all
the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans and lakes to
heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the water is in the
air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or snow. And it
seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too. More evidence
of global warming.


On the other hand, 2018 saw the fewest (total) deaths from tornadoes in
the US since 1875.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/n...est-since-1875

Italy seems to have had an unusual number, however.

Must be global warming.


Inherently rare events like hurricanes and, I suppose, tornado deaths
will always show a lot of random fluctuations. (The same is true of
bicycling fatalities.) I don't think those fluctuations can
necessarily be used to prove any particular cause.


I was reacting to the hurricanes bit.

But long term changes in common and ordinary data are more likely to
mean something is happening.


It's hard to generalize to the globe from one's personal experience,
"global temperature" is really a surprisingly abstract thing.

Long before most of the discussion on climate change, I came across an
article discussing data a historian noted in diaries of British
farmers. Farmers were diligent about recording the dates of the last
frost, and those dates had been consistently creeping earlier for many
decades. To me, that indicates a real trend with a real cause.


Indeed, central England temperatures have been generally rising since at
the very latest 1900, as we continue to exit the "Little Ice Age".
Before that we had a Medieval Climate Optimum (warm period), a Roman
Climate Optimum, A Minoan Climate Optimum, all alternating with cooler
periods. The oldest optimum, oddly, seems to have been the warmest.

There are faster oscillations superimposed on that. The Atlantic and
Pacific Decadal Oscillations, which have a period of roughly 60 years
-- the 30s were quite warm, followed by cooling until the 80s or so,
followed by warming ...

Then there are slower oscillations, producing the interglacials that
periodically interrupt the Ice Age we've been having for almost 3
million years.

It's oscillations, usually irregular, all the way down into really
deep time. So yes, there are real trends, there have *always* been real
trends, and to a great extent we still do not understand the real causes
well enough to predict, let alone alter, their course.

I don't doubt that atmospheric CO2, some of which is anthropogenic,
plays some role in the climate. I do doubt that anyone alive can
predict the effect of everyone going out and buying a Tesla or riding a
bicycle instead of piloting a massive SUV might have on global
temperature to any useful standard at all. Much less whether it might
be good or bad for humanity.


--
  #27  
Old January 4th 19, 01:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On 1/3/2019 5:11 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM,
wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.

Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly. If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it was winter in the Midwest.


It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski


Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when its 33-34-35 degrees. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and February. So its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I suspect all the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans and lakes to heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the water is in the air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or snow. And it seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too. More evidence of global warming.


I don't know but I don't think you do either:

https://www.wunderground.com/hurrica....asp?region=at

At least storms like the one which wiped Galveston clean in
1900 are not everyday events.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #28  
Old January 4th 19, 01:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On 1/3/2019 6:37 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 6:52 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank
Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6,
jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some
place where
there was snow on the ground for long periods of time
and below
zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.

Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real
winter in
more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the
middle of
the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be
in the 40s
or 50s highs for the next week. In early January???
It does snow
two or three times each winter. An inch or two that
sticks around
for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a
few hours
and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need
studs for a
few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works
perfectly.
If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never
even know it
was winter in the Midwest.

It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but
examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them
occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least
1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are
statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when
its 33-34-35
degrees. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and
February. So
its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I
suspect all
the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans
and lakes to
heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the
water is in the
air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or
snow. And it
seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too.
More evidence
of global warming.


On the other hand, 2018 saw the fewest (total) deaths from
tornadoes in
the US since 1875.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/n...est-since-1875


Italy seems to have had an unusual number, however.

Must be global warming.


Inherently rare events like hurricanes and, I suppose,
tornado deaths will always show a lot of random
fluctuations. (The same is true of bicycling fatalities.) I
don't think those fluctuations can necessarily be used to
prove any particular cause.

But long term changes in common and ordinary data are more
likely to mean something is happening.

Long before most of the discussion on climate change, I came
across an article discussing data a historian noted in
diaries of British farmers. Farmers were diligent about
recording the dates of the last frost, and those dates had
been consistently creeping earlier for many decades. To me,
that indicates a real trend with a real cause.


Which completely explains the plowed fields with stone
borders under the retreating Greenland glaciers. The real
question is, will England once again be a major wine
exporter as it was for Hadrian's garrisons?

Where I am now was once a mile deep with ice yet 40 miles
from here there are 100-ft deposits of limestone with shells
from a warm tropic sea. Which future might I expect next?
Which clothes will I need this year?

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #29  
Old January 4th 19, 01:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,168
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On 1/3/2019 7:08 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
Frank Krygowski writes:

On 1/3/2019 6:52 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 2:21:29 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 2:09 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 9:10:57 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:

I couldn't imagine living in the Mid West or some place where
there was snow on the ground for long periods of time and below
zero F on a regular basis. I'd move to Phoenix.

-- Jay Beattie.

Due to Global Warming, the Midwest has not had a real winter in
more than a decade. In Des Moines today, right in the middle of
the Midwest, its 36 degrees and Zero snow. Going to be in the 40s
or 50s highs for the next week. In early January??? It does snow
two or three times each winter. An inch or two that sticks around
for less than a week. But the roads are cleared in a few hours
and easily rideable with studded tires. You only need studs for a
few days of the year. Rest of the time rubber works perfectly.
If it wasn't dark for 16 hours a day, you would never even know it
was winter in the Midwest.

It varies. It's been warm in Ohio this winter, but examining weather
records, of the top 10 snowiest Januaries, six of them occurred since
2000. Likewise, seven of the 10 snowiest Februaries.

Records at that location have been kept since at least 1931 (maybe
longer) so that's nine decades. Those results are statistically odd.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Snow does not mean cold. Its snowed where I live when its 33-34-35
degrees. But 33-34-35 degrees is WARM for January and February. So
its very easy to have global warming and lots of snow. I suspect all
the extra warmth in the air causes the water in oceans and lakes to
heat up and evaporate into the air. And then once the water is in the
air, it has to fall out of the air by either rain or snow. And it
seems we have two or three hurricanes every year too. More evidence
of global warming.

On the other hand, 2018 saw the fewest (total) deaths from tornadoes in
the US since 1875.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/n...est-since-1875

Italy seems to have had an unusual number, however.

Must be global warming.


Inherently rare events like hurricanes and, I suppose, tornado deaths
will always show a lot of random fluctuations. (The same is true of
bicycling fatalities.) I don't think those fluctuations can
necessarily be used to prove any particular cause.


I was reacting to the hurricanes bit.

But long term changes in common and ordinary data are more likely to
mean something is happening.


It's hard to generalize to the globe from one's personal experience,
"global temperature" is really a surprisingly abstract thing.

Long before most of the discussion on climate change, I came across an
article discussing data a historian noted in diaries of British
farmers. Farmers were diligent about recording the dates of the last
frost, and those dates had been consistently creeping earlier for many
decades. To me, that indicates a real trend with a real cause.


Indeed, central England temperatures have been generally rising since at
the very latest 1900, as we continue to exit the "Little Ice Age".
Before that we had a Medieval Climate Optimum (warm period), a Roman
Climate Optimum, A Minoan Climate Optimum, all alternating with cooler
periods. The oldest optimum, oddly, seems to have been the warmest.

There are faster oscillations superimposed on that. The Atlantic and
Pacific Decadal Oscillations, which have a period of roughly 60 years
-- the 30s were quite warm, followed by cooling until the 80s or so,
followed by warming ...

Then there are slower oscillations, producing the interglacials that
periodically interrupt the Ice Age we've been having for almost 3
million years.

It's oscillations, usually irregular, all the way down into really
deep time. So yes, there are real trends, there have *always* been real
trends, and to a great extent we still do not understand the real causes
well enough to predict, let alone alter, their course.

I don't doubt that atmospheric CO2, some of which is anthropogenic,
plays some role in the climate. I do doubt that anyone alive can
predict the effect of everyone going out and buying a Tesla or riding a
bicycle instead of piloting a massive SUV might have on global
temperature to any useful standard at all. Much less whether it might
be good or bad for humanity.



So it's freeze or burn, just like life itself?
https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr076.pdf


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #30  
Old January 4th 19, 02:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,901
Default Build it and ... why aren't they coming?

On 3/1/19 10:24 pm, Roger Merriman wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ms/2319972002/

- Frank Krygowski


How well connected are they? My commute to work has some fairly old and
narrow cycle paths built alongside the by pass, most of the time I don’t
see another cyclist as for most part. It makes sense for me but very few
others.

Yet closer to home routes that are much better connected are unsurprisingly
much busier.


This is one of the variables and there are so many of them.

Interestingly, weather doesn't seem to dissuade people in Denmark. They
wear appropriate clothing and I think the distances they travel by
bicycle is not typically very far.

They have slowly choked out the amenity of driving and replaced it with
cycling.

I don't think it is possible to make driving and cycling simultaneously
amenable, and have people choose to cycle in great numbers.

I suspect that most USian cities still cater heavily for driving, while
some have a bit of cycling specific infrastructure tacked on. That
situation will hardly make a measurable difference.

--
JS
 




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