A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old January 4th 19, 06:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,045
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 1:15:07 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 11:25 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 10:41 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is there any demand for ash lumber? I believe that in New
England some
elm trees infected or killed by the Dutch Elm Disease are
being
gobbled up by companies that specialize in making solid wood
furniture.


My understanding is that there is value in fresh ash, but
that when an ash tree dies, its value goes to zero in a year
or so. Supposedly the wood becomes too brittle.

One proposal was to harvest all the ash in this forest,
paying something like $40,000 for the privilege. It would
have destroyed large patches of the forest floor, which is
famous for its wildflowers (some quite exotic). And it would
have left massive piles of branches at the site of each
tree. The public rejected that idea.

Within a year, the price of ash had fallen so low that all
such ideas were out the window. Supply had greatly exceeded
demand.


"left massive piles of branches at the site"

Huh. I thought they would burn the branches on site to roast
the little buggers.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


You mean you thought they'd turn the ash to ashes? LOL

Cheers
Ads
  #22  
Old January 4th 19, 07:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,167
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On 1/4/2019 12:27 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 1:15:07 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 11:25 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 10:41 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is there any demand for ash lumber? I believe that in New
England some
elm trees infected or killed by the Dutch Elm Disease are
being
gobbled up by companies that specialize in making solid wood
furniture.

My understanding is that there is value in fresh ash, but
that when an ash tree dies, its value goes to zero in a year
or so. Supposedly the wood becomes too brittle.

One proposal was to harvest all the ash in this forest,
paying something like $40,000 for the privilege. It would
have destroyed large patches of the forest floor, which is
famous for its wildflowers (some quite exotic). And it would
have left massive piles of branches at the site of each
tree. The public rejected that idea.

Within a year, the price of ash had fallen so low that all
such ideas were out the window. Supply had greatly exceeded
demand.


"left massive piles of branches at the site"

Huh. I thought they would burn the branches on site to roast
the little buggers.


You mean you thought they'd turn the ash to ashes? LOL


There's a constant admonishment to not move
lumber/logs/mulch as it may spread the insects. I assumed
that if there were uninfected trees in the area a pile of
infected branches would be a liability. I'm not an expert
just wondering.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #23  
Old January 4th 19, 07:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 268
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On 04/01/2019 2:28 p.m., AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 12:27 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 1:15:07 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 11:25 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 10:41 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is there any demand for ash lumber? I believe that in New
England some
elm trees infected or killed by the Dutch Elm Disease are
being
gobbled up by companies that specialize in making solid wood
furniture.

My understanding is that there is value in fresh ash, but
that when an ash tree dies, its value goes to zero in a year
or so. Supposedly the wood becomes too brittle.

One proposal was to harvest all the ash in this forest,
paying something like $40,000 for the privilege. It would
have destroyed large patches of the forest floor, which is
famous for its wildflowers (some quite exotic). And it would
have left massive piles of branches at the site of each
tree. The public rejected that idea.

Within a year, the price of ash had fallen so low that all
such ideas were out the window. Supply had greatly exceeded
demand.


"left massive piles of branches at the site"

Huh. I thought they would burn the branches on site to roast
the little buggers.


You mean you thought they'd turn the ash to ashes? LOL


There's a constant admonishment to not move lumber/logs/mulch as it may
spread the insects. I assumed that if there were uninfected trees in the
area a pile of infected branches would be a liability. I'm not an expert
just wondering.


Here I had two felled before they fell on their own. I had to keep them
on my property until fall when the bugs went dormant.

I guess the idea is that if they are already in my yard there's a good
chance that they're in my neighbor's yard so better to not move them
somewhere that is not yet infested.
  #24  
Old January 4th 19, 08:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,767
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 8:24:57 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 04/01/2019 11:11 a.m., Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 7:43:22 PM UTC-6, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

So for those of you who ride in both rain and snow, which do you prefer?


I try not to ride in either rain or snow. I ride for enjoyment. I
have no mental, psychic, or psychological problem that makes me ride
when its not fun to ride. I guess that makes me crazy. I just ride
when its enjoyable. Actually I try to only do things that are
enjoyable and try not to do anything unenjoyable. Again, crazy me.

But as already stated by others, snow means cold. Its 32 or colder
when there is snow. Rain means warmer than snow. Its above 32 with
rain. Rain and snow are identical except for the temperature. I like
to be warmer than colder. So if I had to choose between the fire or
stove for being burned, I guess I would choose the rain. Its going to
be warmer.


I find that it's much colder and more miserable to ride in rain at 33F
than snow at 31F. Heat transfer is not entirely about temperature
differences.



+1


Near freezing rain does suck -- but it sucks less if you have good rain gear and avoid climbs and descents. Hypothermia is a thing riding in cold rain and even racing in cold rain when there are long descents. When you're not generating heat, soaked and taking a lot of wind on a downhill, you get to a point where you're shivering so hard that you can barely hold the bars -- and your head freezes, rain drops pelt your eyes and you get that squinty-eye semi-conscious thing going. Its loads of fun!

Early season racing in the PNW is often in the rain and cold, and you get that wonderful fire-hose in the face with all the wheel spray, which is horrible with glasses. I placed in races by simply deciding who was riding well and sticking to that guy's wheel for dear life, not knowing where I was in all the falling rain and wheel spray. And lining up to start in the rain and just sitting there totally sucked -- even with the dopey see through rain jackets/human green houses. Thank Buddha for modern raincoat technology like the Gabba and some of the other rain jerseys and fitted jackets.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #25  
Old January 4th 19, 08:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 268
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On 04/01/2019 3:34 p.m., jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 8:24:57 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 04/01/2019 11:11 a.m., Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 7:43:22 PM UTC-6, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

So for those of you who ride in both rain and snow, which do you prefer?


I try not to ride in either rain or snow. I ride for enjoyment. I
have no mental, psychic, or psychological problem that makes me ride
when its not fun to ride. I guess that makes me crazy. I just ride
when its enjoyable. Actually I try to only do things that are
enjoyable and try not to do anything unenjoyable. Again, crazy me.

But as already stated by others, snow means cold. Its 32 or colder
when there is snow. Rain means warmer than snow. Its above 32 with
rain. Rain and snow are identical except for the temperature. I like
to be warmer than colder. So if I had to choose between the fire or
stove for being burned, I guess I would choose the rain. Its going to
be warmer.

I find that it's much colder and more miserable to ride in rain at 33F
than snow at 31F. Heat transfer is not entirely about temperature
differences.



+1


Near freezing rain does suck -- but it sucks less if you have good rain gear and avoid climbs and descents. Hypothermia is a thing riding in cold rain and even racing in cold rain when there are long descents. When you're not generating heat, soaked and taking a lot of wind on a downhill, you get to a point where you're shivering so hard that you can barely hold the bars -- and your head freezes, rain drops pelt your eyes and you get that squinty-eye semi-conscious thing going. Its loads of fun!

Early season racing in the PNW is often in the rain and cold, and you get that wonderful fire-hose in the face with all the wheel spray, which is horrible with glasses. I placed in races by simply deciding who was riding well and sticking to that guy's wheel for dear life, not knowing where I was in all the falling rain and wheel spray. And lining up to start in the rain and just sitting there totally sucked -- even with the dopey see through rain jackets/human green houses. Thank Buddha for modern raincoat technology like the Gabba and some of the other rain jerseys and fitted jackets.

-- Jay Beattie.


I was doing the Tour de L'Ile ride here several years ago. 80km. In
June and it was 6 or 7C. Started to rain hard and I dumped at about
15km trying to move to the right to pass someone and didn't see that
there was a curb separating a bike lane and the road I was on.
Separated my shoulder. I got back on and finished. My fingers were
frozen and that's all that bothered me. At the end we stopped at a
dumpling shop that didn't mind us dripping. After a hot and sour soup I
thawed out and realized I was hurt.

I prefer snow.
  #26  
Old January 4th 19, 10:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,206
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

jbeattie writes:

On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 8:24:57 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 04/01/2019 11:11 a.m., Radey Shouman wrote:
" writes:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 7:43:22 PM UTC-6, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

So for those of you who ride in both rain and snow, which do you prefer?


I try not to ride in either rain or snow. I ride for enjoyment. I
have no mental, psychic, or psychological problem that makes me ride
when its not fun to ride. I guess that makes me crazy. I just ride
when its enjoyable. Actually I try to only do things that are
enjoyable and try not to do anything unenjoyable. Again, crazy me.

But as already stated by others, snow means cold. Its 32 or colder
when there is snow. Rain means warmer than snow. Its above 32 with
rain. Rain and snow are identical except for the temperature. I like
to be warmer than colder. So if I had to choose between the fire or
stove for being burned, I guess I would choose the rain. Its going to
be warmer.

I find that it's much colder and more miserable to ride in rain at 33F
than snow at 31F. Heat transfer is not entirely about temperature
differences.



+1


Near freezing rain does suck -- but it sucks less if you have good
rain gear and avoid climbs and descents. Hypothermia is a thing riding
in cold rain and even racing in cold rain when there are long
descents. When you're not generating heat, soaked and taking a lot of
wind on a downhill, you get to a point where you're shivering so hard
that you can barely hold the bars -- and your head freezes, rain drops
pelt your eyes and you get that squinty-eye semi-conscious thing
going. Its loads of fun!


The other problem with near freezing rain is that it so often freezes,
becoming much slicker than new-fallen snow. The worst of both worlds is
that weatherman's favorite, the "wintry mix", alternating unpredictably
between rain, snow, and sleet.
  #27  
Old January 4th 19, 10:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 805
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 12:25:37 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 1/3/2019 10:41 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is there any demand for ash lumber? I believe that in New England some
elm trees infected or killed by the Dutch Elm Disease are being
gobbled up by companies that specialize in making solid wood
furniture.


My understanding is that there is value in fresh ash, but that when an
ash tree dies, its value goes to zero in a year or so. Supposedly the
wood becomes too brittle.

One proposal was to harvest all the ash in this forest, paying something
like $40,000 for the privilege. It would have destroyed large patches of
the forest floor, which is famous for its wildflowers (some quite
exotic). And it would have left massive piles of branches at the site of
each tree. The public rejected that idea.

Within a year, the price of ash had fallen so low that all such ideas
were out the window. Supply had greatly exceeded demand.


It would appear that either ash wood is worthless or someone's brother
in law owns a wood saw :-) In New England, at one time, if one had
woodland one could get it cleared by doing a deal with a lumber
company to cut and clear the land for a part of the resultant lumber.

cheers,

John B.


  #28  
Old January 4th 19, 11:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 805
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 14:30:37 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 04/01/2019 2:28 p.m., AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 12:27 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 1:15:07 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 11:25 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 10:41 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is there any demand for ash lumber? I believe that in New
England some
elm trees infected or killed by the Dutch Elm Disease are
being
gobbled up by companies that specialize in making solid wood
furniture.

My understanding is that there is value in fresh ash, but
that when an ash tree dies, its value goes to zero in a year
or so. Supposedly the wood becomes too brittle.

One proposal was to harvest all the ash in this forest,
paying something like $40,000 for the privilege. It would
have destroyed large patches of the forest floor, which is
famous for its wildflowers (some quite exotic). And it would
have left massive piles of branches at the site of each
tree. The public rejected that idea.

Within a year, the price of ash had fallen so low that all
such ideas were out the window. Supply had greatly exceeded
demand.


"left massive piles of branches at the site"

Huh. I thought they would burn the branches on site to roast
the little buggers.


You mean you thought they'd turn the ash to ashes? LOL


There's a constant admonishment to not move lumber/logs/mulch as it may
spread the insects. I assumed that if there were uninfected trees in the
area a pile of infected branches would be a liability. I'm not an expert
just wondering.


Here I had two felled before they fell on their own. I had to keep them
on my property until fall when the bugs went dormant.

I guess the idea is that if they are already in my yard there's a good
chance that they're in my neighbor's yard so better to not move them
somewhere that is not yet infested.


Is there no "treatment" that can be done" I know that for Dutch Elm
Disease there is a treatment although it has to, I believe, be applied
in the early days of infection.


cheers,

John B.


  #29  
Old January 5th 19, 01:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,442
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 14:30:37 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 04/01/2019 2:28 p.m., AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 12:27 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 1:15:07 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 11:25 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/3/2019 10:41 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is there any demand for ash lumber? I believe that in New
England some
elm trees infected or killed by the Dutch Elm Disease are
being
gobbled up by companies that specialize in making solid wood
furniture.

My understanding is that there is value in fresh ash, but
that when an ash tree dies, its value goes to zero in a year
or so. Supposedly the wood becomes too brittle.

One proposal was to harvest all the ash in this forest,
paying something like $40,000 for the privilege. It would
have destroyed large patches of the forest floor, which is
famous for its wildflowers (some quite exotic). And it would
have left massive piles of branches at the site of each
tree. The public rejected that idea.

Within a year, the price of ash had fallen so low that all
such ideas were out the window. Supply had greatly exceeded
demand.


"left massive piles of branches at the site"

Huh. I thought they would burn the branches on site to roast
the little buggers.

You mean you thought they'd turn the ash to ashes? LOL

There's a constant admonishment to not move lumber/logs/mulch as it may
spread the insects. I assumed that if there were uninfected trees in the
area a pile of infected branches would be a liability. I'm not an expert
just wondering.


Here I had two felled before they fell on their own. I had to keep them
on my property until fall when the bugs went dormant.

I guess the idea is that if they are already in my yard there's a good
chance that they're in my neighbor's yard so better to not move them
somewhere that is not yet infested.


Is there no "treatment" that can be done" I know that for Dutch Elm
Disease there is a treatment although it has to, I believe, be applied
in the early days of infection.


cheers,

John B.




There is a treatment but in my case the two ash were in a tight copse of 4
trees and the leaf growth was at the top, about 40 feet up. The inspectors
said this was not conducive to treatment and gave me permits to fell them.
It was probably too late for treatment anyway.

--
duane
  #30  
Old January 5th 19, 03:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,045
Default Rain or snow - which do you prefer to ride in?

On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 9:50:48 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/4/2019 7:47 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

Snipped
Another thing I watch for is melted snow or water that has frozen in the evening or whenever else the temperature has dropped. I have thought about building a folding outrigger-wheel for the winter bike. When there's ice I could drop the third wheel and basically turn the bike into a tricycle.

Cheers


"many drivers or their cars can't handle ice"

The salesman said, "This baby has computer traction control.
You an go through anything." and they believed that. Which
explains so many small 4-wheel drive vehicles in the ditch
after a snowfall.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


That's the truth. I've seen many 4-wheel drive vehicles in ditches or accidents because their driver did not know how to drive to suit the conditions.

Cheers
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Who's up for a rain ride? Mike Jacoubowsky Rides 11 January 2nd 05 05:07 AM
RR: First snow ride Mike Kennedy Mountain Biking 2 December 3rd 04 01:10 AM
First rain ride of the season Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles Rides 33 October 22nd 04 12:04 AM
First rain ride of the season Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles Rides 0 October 19th 04 09:06 PM
Big Snow, Ride Hard aspenmike Unicycling 5 January 5th 04 05:49 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.