A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

question about climbing



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 22nd 18, 07:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default question about climbing

I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2 miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any climbing experts in this group.



mark
Ads
  #2  
Old July 22nd 18, 09:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 293
Default question about climbing

On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 8:33:16 PM UTC+2, wrote:
I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2 miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any climbing experts in this group.



mark


As someone from a dead flat country who likes the mountains and just back from my annual tour through the alps I can say:
- Alpe d'Huez is not the hardest climb,
- we don't plan a stop during a climb. Stopping during a climb is not an option, it is a defeat ;-) We take pictures in the descent,
- the length and the steepest sections is what is killing you and determines what gearing you need. I used 34-32 for 10% plus grades,
- climbing is about watts/kg,
- you don't need to live in a hilly/mountain country to perform well in the mountains.

Highlights from last trip:
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Rombo_Timmelsjoch
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Kuhtai
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Umbrail
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Stelvio_Stilfserjoch
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Gavia
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Foscagno
https://www.cyclingcols.com/col/Pillerhohe (easy side)

Lou
  #3  
Old July 22nd 18, 11:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,505
Default question about climbing

On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 11:33:16 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2 miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any climbing experts in this group.


Your question is like "what is the best flavor ice cream?" Lou's group expects to continue riding -- but that's not everybody. Plenty of people will stop on the Stelvio or Alp d'Huez or whatever. It all depends on ability, and there really is no "average." You're fit and will figure it out after making some mistakes. It's not like you'll lose a pro contract if you have to stop.

I've never climbed the Alp d'Huez, but I've done lots of longer climbs domestically. It's just grind, grind, grind -- letting off before I blow, and not trying to ride someone else's pace -- which is the difference between riding and racing. It doesn't matter if you lose time on the climb. If you're going to be riding sustained climbs with grades above 12%, get a 32t cassette just in case and a compact 34/50. Take plenty of water and/or your favorite magical potion beverage. Sitting and spinning conserves energy. Ride like Lou's countryman, Tom Dumoulin -- consistent pace and not responding to every surge. I'd say spin like Froome, but man, he really spins -- and then you'd have to stick your elbows out. and Thomas is going to kick his ass (if allowed).

-- Jay Beattie.



  #4  
Old July 23rd 18, 12:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,865
Default question about climbing

On 7/22/2018 5:43 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 11:33:16 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2 miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any climbing experts in this group.


Your question is like "what is the best flavor ice cream?" Lou's group expects to continue riding -- but that's not everybody. Plenty of people will stop on the Stelvio or Alp d'Huez or whatever. It all depends on ability, and there really is no "average." You're fit and will figure it out after making some mistakes. It's not like you'll lose a pro contract if you have to stop.

I've never climbed the Alp d'Huez, but I've done lots of longer climbs domestically. It's just grind, grind, grind -- letting off before I blow, and not trying to ride someone else's pace -- which is the difference between riding and racing. It doesn't matter if you lose time on the climb. If you're going to be riding sustained climbs with grades above 12%, get a 32t cassette just in case and a compact 34/50. Take plenty of water and/or your favorite magical potion beverage. Sitting and spinning conserves energy. Ride like Lou's countryman, Tom Dumoulin -- consistent pace and not responding to every surge. I'd say spin like Froome, but man, he really spins -- and then you'd have to stick your elbows out. and Thomas is going to kick his ass (if allowed).

-- Jay Beattie.




The most important advice is to get off your bike and snap a
photo at the top:

http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/sergmar2.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #5  
Old July 23rd 18, 01:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,440
Default question about climbing

On 7/22/2018 2:33 PM, wrote:
I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2 miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any climbing experts in this group.


I've never done a mountain pass in Europe (well, except Connor Pass in
Ireland, which barely qualifies) but I've done some in the Rockies, with
a full camping load on the bike.

Does 34-32 make it much easier than 34-28? Yes, absolutely. The force
required is proportional to the gearing. Lower gears, lower force (and
lower speed, of course). Because of our loads, our gearing was much
lower: I think we used 28 tooth chainrings and 32 tooth rear cogs. We
just downshifted and kept spinning.

On most of the passes, we could have kept spinning all day, but we
stopped when there was shade because of blazing heat. On other climbs,
my wife stopped for a rest while my daughter and I kept pedaling. You do
what you feel like doing.

When you get to the top, nobody is going to mock you if you stopped.
These climbs are still impressive achievements, assuming you don't get
help from a motor.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #6  
Old July 23rd 18, 05:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,789
Default question about climbing

On 23/07/18 04:33, wrote:
I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid
rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that
are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I
see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles
seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during
the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2
miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I
tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up
for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent
cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much
easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is
the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to
really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after
a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D
Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any
climbing experts in this group.


I wouldn't be planning to stop mid way, unless perhaps to photograph
someone riding up who was making it look like hard yakka.

--
JS
  #7  
Old July 23rd 18, 08:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 293
Default question about climbing

On Monday, July 23, 2018 at 12:43:37 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 11:33:16 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I live in the flatlands and not a great climber but pretty solid rider. I have done some climbs according to various categories that are 3 and 4 rated. I got them ok on a 34-28 but not just easy. So I see the Alpe D'Huez and the rating plus going up 8 % for over 8 miles seems a bit much for me to comprehend.

Do most mortals who do the Alpe D"Huez go up without stopping during the climb? One climb I do is overall about 6% and it goes on for 1.2 miles. The very last section gets to 9% or about maybe 1/4 mile. I tell you I can get up no problem but I just cannot see keep that up for another 7 miles. I am pretty spent the last 200 feet.

So I assume those climbing these on tours and such are pretty decent cyclist but what gearing. Would a 34-32 really make it that much easier to manage than say a 34-28 that I use now. They say sitting is the best way to climb but I guess I just do not do enough of it to really tell. I do know that when I am around more hilly terrain after a few days I get better at climbing.

Does the average cyclist planning to climb something like the Alpe D Huez factor in a break of a few minutes at some point or points. Any climbing experts in this group.


Your question is like "what is the best flavor ice cream?" Lou's group expects to continue riding -- but that's not everybody. Plenty of people will stop on the Stelvio or Alp d'Huez or whatever. It all depends on ability, and there really is no "average." You're fit and will figure it out after making some mistakes. It's not like you'll lose a pro contract if you have to stop.

I've never climbed the Alp d'Huez, but I've done lots of longer climbs domestically. It's just grind, grind, grind -- letting off before I blow, and not trying to ride someone else's pace -- which is the difference between riding and racing. It doesn't matter if you lose time on the climb. If you're going to be riding sustained climbs with grades above 12%, get a 32t cassette just in case and a compact 34/50. Take plenty of water and/or your favorite magical potion beverage. Sitting and spinning conserves energy. Ride like Lou's countryman, Tom Dumoulin -- consistent pace and not responding to every surge. I'd say spin like Froome, but man, he really spins -- and then you'd have to stick your elbows out. and Thomas is going to kick his ass (if allowed).

-- Jay Beattie.


Agreed. It was of course a joke that you are not allowed to stop during a climb. I don't but that is just me. This years I start using a power meter and figured out I can sustain 220 Watts. Knowing this helps a lot on longer climbs (2 hours and more).

Regarding Tom Dumoulin, in a interview on Dutch television last night he was asked how his shape was compared to the Giro. He said it is better. Why? I lost some weight he said: 1 kg.
Like I said climbing is all about Watts/kg, so lose as much weight as you can: on your bike and on yourself. Don't carry a gallon of water if you don't gonna use it or tools you don't gonna need.

Lou
  #10  
Old July 24th 18, 12:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default question about climbing

On Monday, July 23, 2018 at 5:33:17 AM UTC-5, Duane wrote:
James wrote:
On 23/07/18 17:30, wrote:


Agreed. It was of course a joke that you are not allowed to stop
during a climb. I don't but that is just me. This years I start using
a power meter and figured out I can sustain 220 Watts. Knowing this
helps a lot on longer climbs (2 hours and more).

Regarding Tom Dumoulin, in a interview on Dutch television last night
he was asked how his shape was compared to the Giro. He said it is
better. Why? I lost some weight he said: 1 kg. Like I said climbing
is all about Watts/kg, so lose as much weight as you can: on your
bike and on yourself. Don't carry a gallon of water if you don't
gonna use it or tools you don't gonna need.


If someone breaks a chain, scavenge a rock and a rusty nail, but don't
carry a multitool that has a chain tool built in.


I’d leave the growler at home and probably the rope and music setup as
well.

--
duane


YEs this make sense so now I see that just don't redline. Have to try this next time in encounter the climbs I have in the past. I just have always been able to see the finish or know it to redline just right. 8% for 8 miles that requires pacing skills. Like a Marathon and I have done many of them....…….going out fast is disaster more most mortals.

Mark
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rec.mtn.climbing ? kolldata Techniques 2 June 7th 10 02:56 PM
Climbing Dan O Techniques 76 September 27th 08 05:41 AM
climbing Zebee Johnstone Australia 7 July 3rd 06 09:26 PM
Climbing OTB p e t e f a g e r l i n Mountain Biking 26 May 9th 06 03:56 PM
Question about hill climbing technique Walrus Australia 14 July 17th 04 12:37 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.