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SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!



 
 
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  #151  
Old October 9th 18, 04:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,418
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 7:53:45 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-08 16:55, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 4:16:43 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-08 16:05, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 11:06:53 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-07 17:08, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 15:02:19 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 10/6/2018 2:49 PM, Joerg wrote:

[...]


2. It causes oncoming motorists to see the cyclist much
earlier and, for example, if a big semi comes they can
pull a bit to the right so the semi can give the cyclist
wide berth.

I do NOT believe any practical light allows a motorist to
see a cyclist _much_ earlier. In almost every case, I've
seen on-road cyclists before I noticed that they had a
light. And in no case did I see the light early enough to
make any practical difference. You're fixating on a
superstitious talisman, imagining benefits that don't exist
in real life.


I think I've mentioned seeing the bloke on a bike wearing
bright orange knee socks nearly a kilometer away :-) I
remember the orange socks but can't remember whether he had a
light on his bike or not :-)


I wonder what the reaction would be if said bloke participated
in a business meeting wearing bright orange knee socks.

The subject was bicycle visibility, not business meetings....


To me a bicycle is not just a piece of sports equipment but
foremost a transport vehicle.


Wow, that's poignant.



Well, that is how I've always seen bicycles. Over my lifetime about half
the cycling miles were not sports or fun-related. With good lighting I
can make myself very visible to traffic without being dressed like a
macaw parrot. Therefore, I can enjoy almost the same convenience as with
a car. I arrive, I lock the bike, grab whatever I have to carry from the
rack or panniers and I walk in. This is also one of the reasons why my
bikes were immediately equipped with racks and panniers when I got them.
No sweaty back from a backpack in summer.

Besides, most of this "functional clothing" is incompatible with my
body. Gives me rashes or a profuse sweat, neither of which being very
sightly at a client.


... I've been commuting to school or work for 50
years and changing my clothes for the last 40. Even when I was a
substitute teacher, I would ride to school with a backpack and change
when I got there. There is always some place to change.



Sure there is. However, as an engineer who does not work there as an
employee I find it a bit out of place to ask for a room to change. Also,
sometimes you walk in and end up right in the business. "Oh, let me
quickly introduce to Dr.So-and-so here" and then I don't want to stand
there in orange knee socks.

Heck, I even make sure I have enough water for the trip back on the bike
so I don't have to ask if I can refill in their cantina.


... I certainly
wouldn't go to a client meeting in rain drenched or sweat drenched
shirt -- or in shorts. Do you go to client meetings in t-shirts and
shorts?


Depends on which one and what the task at hand is. Like on the two
recent trips. One was with a dress shirt, a fairly new pair of
non-stoned-washed black jeans and nice black jogging shoes. This was to
test one of my designs together with their engineers, a situation where
there could also be witnesses from their customer. Another trip required
me to just pick up some stuff for testing in my lab. There I rode with
T-shirt, shorts and sandals, but all clean and no loud colors.


... but having said that I might comment that it is not difficult
to change socks, even sitting on the roadside curb.


And change all the other things sitting on a curb in a business
park? I rather flick a little switch and have instant visibility.
Upon arrival I flick it again, visibility turns off. Simple.


Do you have a side light? I'd worry about that. Pull though an
intersection and "whack." Where was your side light! You really
should have a bright side light.


The rear light does shine to the sides. Also, my parents taught me as a
kid not to blindly pull into intersections just because I have the right
of way. That has saved the bacon numerous times where people completely
missed a red light and blew through at high speed.


Spew from your rear light is not going to cut it. You NEED a dedicated sidelight. Someone I know who knows someone got killed in an intersection because he/she didn't have a side light. Everybody around here has one, at least anyone who is anyone. They are so popular that they are sold out on Amazon. You are probably the only one without a sidelight.

You also NEED the Garmin radar system. https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/518151 People get hit ALL THE TIME from the rear, and you would be a fool not to have radar -- oh yah, its "my granddaddy didn't wear seat belts," so you think it is safe enough because you haven't used radar so far. Well, think again. I use my radar, and I have avoided dozens of rear end collisions. I just know it.

And many drivers are distracted, so you NEED to have a loud horn on your bike. https://www.ebay.com/itm/183139721567 Even cars have horns! You would be crazy not to have a super-loud electronic horn on your bike. If I didn't have my horn, I would have gotten hit five or six times just riding to work this morning. I just know it.

Only fools ride without hi-viz . . . and a safety seat (those pointed noses can emasculate you!). More on my website www.beterrified.com (visit the store).

-- Jay Beattie.

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  #152  
Old October 9th 18, 04:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

AMuzi wrote:

Some friendly advice, Frank. Don't go into
Marketing. Maybe try something like
Engineering maybe.


I think Frank should be a coach for a women's
football/soccer team. His dialogue-oriented
style and encouraging tone would come right
into play.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #153  
Old October 9th 18, 05:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,316
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 10/9/2018 11:31 AM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
AMuzi wrote:

Some friendly advice, Frank. Don't go into
Marketing. Maybe try something like
Engineering maybe.


I think Frank should be a coach for a women's
football/soccer team. His dialogue-oriented
style and encouraging tone would come right
into play.


Yeah, but I'd first have to learn that confusing rule about "offsides."
Can't be bothered.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #154  
Old October 9th 18, 05:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,316
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 10/9/2018 10:02 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 6:44:15 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/8/2018 7:55 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 4:16:43 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-08 16:05, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 11:06:53 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-07 17:08, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 15:02:19 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 10/6/2018 2:49 PM, Joerg wrote:

[...]


2. It causes oncoming motorists to see the cyclist much earlier and, for
example, if a big semi comes they can pull a bit to the right so the
semi can give the cyclist wide berth.

I do NOT believe any practical light allows a motorist to see a cyclist
_much_ earlier. In almost every case, I've seen on-road cyclists before
I noticed that they had a light. And in no case did I see the light
early enough to make any practical difference. You're fixating on a
superstitious talisman, imagining benefits that don't exist in real life.


I think I've mentioned seeing the bloke on a bike wearing bright
orange knee socks nearly a kilometer away :-) I remember the orange
socks but can't remember whether he had a light on his bike or not :-)


I wonder what the reaction would be if said bloke participated in a
business meeting wearing bright orange knee socks.

The subject was bicycle visibility, not business meetings....


To me a bicycle is not just a piece of sports equipment but foremost a
transport vehicle.

Wow, that's poignant. I've been commuting to school or work for 50 years and changing my clothes for the last 40. Even when I was a substitute teacher, I would ride to school with a backpack and change when I got there. There is always some place to change. I certainly wouldn't go to a client meeting in rain drenched or sweat drenched shirt -- or in shorts. Do you go to client meetings in t-shirts and shorts?


I bike commuted for over 30 years (admittedly, not every day) wearing
the same business casual clothes I wore during the work day. I wasn't
super-fast, but the seven mile trip between home and the last job took
me less than half an hour, traffic lights and all. I took it easy on the
(downhill) way to work, and usually time trialed on the way home. My
clothes were sweaty when I got home, but they could go in the laundry.


I had a job in California a few miles from home and would wear my work pants, but I still had to put on a shirt and tie. I shined-up a lot of pants, by the way. I would not subject my nice wool pants to the abuse, and during the rainy season, forget it. I remember commuting to a job I had for a short time down near DeAnza college in SMS territory -- maybe a ten mile commute, and getting soaked and sitting around in wet work clothes. Miserable and embarrassing. I didn't have a car, and cycling wasn't elective.


We don't have a real rainy season like Portland has, and I'm admittedly
more wimpish than you. If it was raining when it was time to head to
work, I usually just took the car.

When living down south, my commute route was level and short, less than
three miles. Up here, I benefited by having a mostly level to downhill
ride to work, so it was easy to take it easy. And most of my rides in
happened in the morning when it was still cool.

The only times I changed clothes was when teaching evening classes in
the summer. Then I'd be riding in about noon. I would change and cool
down - sometimes in front of a fan - before I had to deal with anyone else.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #155  
Old October 9th 18, 05:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,316
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 10/9/2018 10:57 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-08 17:22, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:16:43 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-08 16:05, John B. Slocomb wrote:


[...]

************************* ************************* ****** ... but
having said that I might comment that it is not difficult to change
socks, even sitting on the roadside curb.


And change all the other things sitting on a curb in a business park? I
rather flick a little switch and have instant visibility. Upon arrival I
flick it again, visibility turns off. Simple.


As I said, I noticed the orange socks going up and down a kilometer
away on a bright summer day. I doubt strongly whether your super-duper
light would even be visible (in bright daylight) at that distance.



It sure is. I can say that for sure because this occasionally happens on
Green Valley Road when I have to use the car and another cyclist has
such good lighting. No orange socks. The riders with good lights are
often longhaul bike commuters. They wear nice shirts, khakis and have
panniers for their laptops and stuff.


So tell us about all the times you hit, or skidded your smoking tires to
avoid, cyclists who were riding legally but without all the magic
talismans you claim necessary.

I know in advance your tales will be imaginary, but your fantasies are
always such fun to read.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #156  
Old October 9th 18, 08:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,418
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 9:25:09 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/9/2018 10:57 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-08 17:22, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:16:43 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-08 16:05, John B. Slocomb wrote:


[...]

************************* ************************* ****** ... but
having said that I might comment that it is not difficult to change
socks, even sitting on the roadside curb.


And change all the other things sitting on a curb in a business park? I
rather flick a little switch and have instant visibility. Upon arrival I
flick it again, visibility turns off. Simple.

As I said, I noticed the orange socks going up and down a kilometer
away on a bright summer day. I doubt strongly whether your super-duper
light would even be visible (in bright daylight) at that distance.



It sure is. I can say that for sure because this occasionally happens on
Green Valley Road when I have to use the car and another cyclist has
such good lighting. No orange socks. The riders with good lights are
often longhaul bike commuters. They wear nice shirts, khakis and have
panniers for their laptops and stuff.


So tell us about all the times you hit, or skidded your smoking tires to
avoid, cyclists who were riding legally but without all the magic
talismans you claim necessary.

I know in advance your tales will be imaginary, but your fantasies are
always such fun to read.


And if you're a long haul commuter, you're not wearing a nice shirt -- unless you're a long haul commuter on an eBike. I ride three miles cross town on a warm day, and I'll soak through my nice work shirt. Maybe I could do it in cool weather, but even then, why would I wear a nice shirt riding a bike? I'm not a missionary, and who wants to get a nice shirt all stinky or covered in road grime. Even around here, the street clothes people tend to commute in t-shirts and change at work (those in my office) -- or work someplace where they can dress like urchins. https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/...nMxzsKV8Q.jpeg (commuter traffic on N. Williams). Or they have super-short commutes.

On my side of town, bike specific clothes are more common, probably because of the longer commute distances and climbing. During rainy season, people on both sides of town tend to dress more technically.

I passed a guy this morning who dressed in Showers Pass garb, top to bottom.. I never wear rain pants. Showers Pass, Rapha USA and Castelli USA are all in Portland and all of them have killer warehouse sales, so a lot of people get stuff to dress up. The Rapha sale is crazy. It's like stuffing a phone booth full of clowns, but even at half-off, its too rich for me.

-- Jay Beattie.


-- Jay Beattie.
  #157  
Old October 9th 18, 09:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Oculus Lights[_2_]
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Posts: 35
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Monday, October 1, 2018 at 3:14:21 PM UTC-7, wrote:
http://reviews.mtbr.com/magicshine-l...2018-interbike

The beloved Magicshine brings us what we finally need in bike lights. Thanks to all the gods. 6500 lumens! I think you can have either 5000 or 1500 or all 6500 lumens. Thankfully now we will not only be able to blind everyone else on the road or trail, but we can now cause their eyeballs to burst into flames and maybe hopefully their heads will also explode. Yeah!!!!!!

I don't know why "sms" did not report this in his post about Interbike. This has to be the most important thing to ever come from Interbike. He is letting us down.

Here is the post from the article:
"This latest offering from Magicshine incorporates everything they have learned about MTB lights over the years. The Monteer 6500 is MTB headlight designed for the most serious mountain biking enthusiasts, downhill racers and those who want nothing less than professional grade lighting system that can outshine the landing light on a passenger airliner.
A max actual output of 6500 lumens is cranked out by 3x CREE XHP 50.2 and 2x XM-L2 LEDs. Like the Eagle series MTB headlights, Monteer 6500 is designed with multiple beam patterns modes, the XHP50.2 will put out a max of 5000 lumens of flood light, while the bottom row of XM-L2s shoots into the distance with up to 1500 lumens."

It even has "CREE XHP and XM-L2 LEDs". So you know its got to be great. I bet it even meets or exceeds that German bicycle light standard.


Yes, LFJ from Amazon. And Sepp Ruff again, not asking what's up about so and so, just blindly splinging regurgitated internet poop, again.

Amazon agreed with my conclusion that the buyer didn't make his purchase in good faith, rather just wanted a freebie demo, maybe used it for an event, and then expected to get his money back after using it for whatever ultra race or distance event he wanted it for. Maybe he was acting as shill for one of the big light makers.
Overall, yes, a douche bag.

Part of learning customer service, is there are 2-3% of the customer base who will not be satisfiable. Best to cut them off sooner than later, without engaging in protracted bandwidth.
An hour of time to a one-man-show who also works a full-time day job is a huge drain on resources compared to a large corporate operation.
That purchaser filed a complaint with Amazon. Condensing a longer story, Until then, he had refused to return the light for evaluation or describe what wasn't working right or how he expected. Amazon required that he return the light for evaluation before considering his claim. He tried to be as recalcitrant with Amazon as he was being with me. I found nothing wrong with that light at all. Not even surface blemishes or molding irregularities.. Also seemed questionable that he chose to make his purchase through the RAAM pro-deal for a much lower price than he paid retail on Amazon.
Amazon refused his claim. Takes a lot for Amazon to refuse a customer claim.. But they did refuse his.
Neither L&M nor NiteRider would have given him the time of day, let alone engage in his protracted whining.
Businesses are not in business to lose money. There was absolutely nothing wrong with the light, either cosmetically or functionally.
Amazon agreed with my conclusion that the buyer didn't make his purchase in good faith, rather just wanted a freebie demo, maybe used it for an event, and then expected to get his money back after using it for whatever ultra race or distance event he wanted it for. Maybe he was acting as shill for one of the big light makers.
Overall, yes, a douche bag.

  #158  
Old October 9th 18, 10:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,536
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 2018-10-09 12:59, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 9:25:09 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 10/9/2018 10:57 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-08 17:22, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:16:43 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-08 16:05, John B. Slocomb wrote:

[...]

... but having said that I might comment that it is not
difficult to change socks, even sitting on the roadside
curb.


And change all the other things sitting on a curb in a
business park? I rather flick a little switch and have
instant visibility. Upon arrival I flick it again, visibility
turns off. Simple.

As I said, I noticed the orange socks going up and down a
kilometer away on a bright summer day. I doubt strongly whether
your super-duper light would even be visible (in bright
daylight) at that distance.


It sure is. I can say that for sure because this occasionally
happens on Green Valley Road when I have to use the car and
another cyclist has such good lighting. No orange socks. The
riders with good lights are often longhaul bike commuters. They
wear nice shirts, khakis and have panniers for their laptops and
stuff.


So tell us about all the times you hit, or skidded your smoking
tires to avoid, cyclists who were riding legally but without all
the magic talismans you claim necessary.

I know in advance your tales will be imaginary, but your fantasies
are always such fun to read.


And if you're a long haul commuter, you're not wearing a nice shirt
-- unless you're a long haul commuter on an eBike. I ride three miles
cross town on a warm day, and I'll soak through my nice work shirt.
Maybe I could do it in cool weather, but even then, why would I wear
a nice shirt riding a bike? I'm not a missionary, and who wants to
get a nice shirt all stinky or covered in road grime. Even around
here, the street clothes people tend to commute in t-shirts and
change at work (those in my office) -- or work someplace where they
can dress like urchins.



We have an advantage, provided you do not use a road called Hollow Oak
for the way into the valley or at least walk it. Other than Hollow Oak
it's mostly downhill. In the valley all one has to do is ride more
slowly. I know that's hard to do and I sometimes violate that rule when
dressed more nicely. On the way back it's ok to put the hammer down
because the shirt goes into the wash pile. Wear a quality shirt that
doesn't develop salt stains.


https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/...nMxzsKV8Q.jpeg
(commuter traffic on N. Williams). Or they have super-short
commutes.


Here is a speed-clip from the Netherlands so you see lots of commuters.
Our commutes there weren't always short, typically across a whole city
to get to the work place in some business district. I saw people in suit
and tie on their bikes all the time. Also women in heels. Even pastors
in their frocks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-AbPav5E5M


On my side of town, bike specific clothes are more common, probably
because of the longer commute distances and climbing. During rainy
season, people on both sides of town tend to dress more technically.


In Europe we threw on a rain racket and, if it was really bad, spats
that went all the way up the lower leg (I hated those).


I passed a guy this morning who dressed in Showers Pass garb, top to
bottom. ...



Ah, a lawyer or some other millionaire 8-)


... I never wear rain pants. Showers Pass, Rapha USA and
Castelli USA are all in Portland and all of them have killer
warehouse sales, so a lot of people get stuff to dress up. The Rapha
sale is crazy. It's like stuffing a phone booth full of clowns, but
even at half-off, its too rich for me.


Move south, there you rarely need rain clothes. I have a jacket but
can't remember the last time I used it.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #159  
Old October 9th 18, 10:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,352
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 6:56:01 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:

Wow, that's poignant. I've been commuting to school or work for 50 years and changing my clothes for the last 40. Even when I was a substitute teacher, I would ride to school with a backpack and change when I got there. There is always some place to change. I certainly wouldn't go to a client meeting in rain drenched or sweat drenched shirt -- or in shorts. Do you go to client meetings in t-shirts and shorts?

-- Jay Beattie.


The two years I commuted to work I wore a small school backpack. Carried my polo shirt, docker pants, socks, t-shirt. Kept my shoes, belt at work. Only 2 miles for me so I never got sweaty. Just went to the bathroom when I got to work and changed into the work clothes I carried. Put my cycling clothes in the backpack. Put them on when it was time to ride home at the end of the day. Took all of 2-3 minutes to change. Not much of a concern. Used a paper towel to wipe away any moisture/sweat. Had a hair brush at work too.
  #160  
Old October 9th 18, 10:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,352
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 7:27:47 PM UTC-5, John B. Slocomb wrote:

There is also a great danger from large birds. One really should have
an upward shining helmet lamp. I'm a bit ambivalent about snakes, my
present thoughts that one is probably safe from snake bite in a
metropolitan neighborhood.
--
Cheers

John B.


Since you brought up snakes, let me tell you a story. I was riding a 1200km brevet in eastern Colorado back in September 2006. Rode the shoulder of Hwy 36 which parallels I-80. I rode with my head down, because I'm a racer you know. I would see a spot on the shoulder a ways ahead. I'd ride up to it, and it was a coiled up rattlesnake. I would not see it was a rattlesnake until I was right beside it. Front wheel 6 inches beside it. And I would look down and think, that's a rattlesnake. And then I was ten feet up the road, thinking I'm glad it did not strike my leg as I was pedaling by it. This occurred three or four times on that ride. Pretty sure the rattlesnakes were lying on the shoulder for heat absorbing the sunshine and radiant heat from the asphalt. I was not frightened or startled because I did not know it was a rattlesnake until it was too late to even get frightened or startled. Afterwards I would think, that was a rattlesnake. Hmmm. And keep on riding.
 




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