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  #11  
Old March 19th 18, 02:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default milling machine

On 3/18/2018 7:08 PM, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:35:20 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE



The beginning scenes - no loose clothing, no rings or wris****ch, etc.
is good advice. I once worked with a guy that caught a ring on
something when he jumped down out of the bomb bay and tore the skin
off the back of his finger. Just pealed off a strip all the way from
the base of his finger to the fingernail. An Electrician, working on
the same airplane shorted out the main battery bank with his wedding
ring. Melted the gold ring right off his finger (that didn't do the
finger any good either)

As a young Airman those experiences convinced me that jewelry and
working are a poor combination and even today I automatically remove
rings and watches when going to work.


South Bend Lathe manual, 1914, inside back cover, "Before
starting to work on a lathe, roll up your sleeves and remove
your necktie."

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #12  
Old March 19th 18, 04:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,031
Default milling machine

On Monday, March 19, 2018 at 10:53:04 AM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:

South Bend Lathe manual, 1914, inside back cover, "Before
starting to work on a lathe, roll up your sleeves and remove
your necktie."

From back in the days when machinists wore neckties! They were classier back then.

They probably didn't wear eye protection in 1914 either.

Yep, googling yields https://www.umassd.edu/about/historyofumassdartmouth/

Things have gotten much safer since then, of course. Safety inflation is real,
and obviously not bad up to a point. I taught an intro to machine shop lab
(just bare basics) and would come down very hard on a student who omitted
eye protection.

But I know the full-time machinist in that lab sometimes worked without eye
protection, just as I sometimes do on my basement lathe. It's a risk we take
based on our judgment of the circumstances.

OTOH, I don't think I've ever obeyed the "Never use without eye protection!"
warnings that seem to come on things like Harbor Freight screwdrivers. That
company probably puts warnings on its rubber erasers.

Kind of like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gzDC-2ZO8I

I put plastic hats in the same category.

- Frank Krygowski
  #13  
Old March 19th 18, 06:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 877
Default milling machine

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE


A good choice for doing what?


In another thread was the question, how do they
cut aluminium tubes so that they fit together
before welding, e.g. the top and down tube to
the head tube? And the answer is a
milling machine (and not a press drill).

I'm sure the Luna is a good choice for
"doing it" only the person who has to pay for
it might disagree

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #14  
Old March 19th 18, 07:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,801
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 14:13:04 +0700, John B.
wrote:

To be honest I can't think of anything I ever did on a horizontal or
vertical milling machine that would have benefited by having CNC :-)

A lathe, yes, if only turning the balls to put on the ends of a vise
handle, but all the milling I can remember doing was pretty much
straight cuts.

What does the guy plan on doing with the mill?


Small production runs. He's the retired owner of Santa Cruz
Precision:
http://santacruzprecision.com
Some of the machines from the old business are now in his garage.
Most of the stuff he did was designed on a computah using and old
version of SmartCAM.
http://www.smartcamcnc.com
Some of the complex shapes could not have easily been done without the
computer. Same with making multiple parts for short run manufacture.
What inspired this project is that he's getting requests for quotes
from former customers where the profits from 1 or 2 jobs would easily
pay for the CNC conversion. Since the old Bandit CNC controller was
almost dead, it seemed like a good way to go. Right now, we're a bit
stalled due to various personal commitments.

More on the mill:
http://www.buildyouridea.com/cnc/Shizuoka/Shizuoka.html

My payment for doing the computers, electrical and motors is that I
get to use the mill to make custom knives. Something like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98ly5-1bhHU (0:00 to 4:30)



--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #15  
Old March 19th 18, 07:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,801
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 19:47:27 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE


A good choice for doing what?


In another thread was the question,


I don't read every thread.

how do they
cut aluminium tubes so that they fit together
before welding, e.g. the top and down tube to
the head tube? And the answer is a
milling machine (and not a press drill).


It's called "mitering":
https://www.google.com/search?q=mitering+bicycle+tubes
A mill with an tiltable head is probably the easiest way to do it.
I've watched the process, but have never done it myself. It can also
be done with a lathe. I don't know if a drill press will work,
probably not. Forget about using a tubing notcher. If the metal is
soft enough for a notcher to work, then it's not strong enough to
ride.

I'm sure the Luna is a good choice for
"doing it" only the person who has to pay for
it might disagree


I don't know anything about Luna mills. Mitering bicycle tubes does
not require fabulous precision. A Chinese benchtop mill could be used
if you're cheap or desperate. The accuracy is mostly in the jigs and
fixtures.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #16  
Old March 19th 18, 09:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default milling machine

On 3/19/2018 11:52 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Monday, March 19, 2018 at 10:53:04 AM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:

South Bend Lathe manual, 1914, inside back cover, "Before
starting to work on a lathe, roll up your sleeves and remove
your necktie."

From back in the days when machinists wore neckties! They were classier back then.

They probably didn't wear eye protection in 1914 either.

Yep, googling yields https://www.umassd.edu/about/historyofumassdartmouth/

Things have gotten much safer since then, of course. Safety inflation is real,
and obviously not bad up to a point. I taught an intro to machine shop lab
(just bare basics) and would come down very hard on a student who omitted
eye protection.

But I know the full-time machinist in that lab sometimes worked without eye
protection, just as I sometimes do on my basement lathe. It's a risk we take
based on our judgment of the circumstances.

OTOH, I don't think I've ever obeyed the "Never use without eye protection!"
warnings that seem to come on things like Harbor Freight screwdrivers. That
company probably puts warnings on its rubber erasers.

Kind of like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gzDC-2ZO8I

I put plastic hats in the same category.




The expression for that is 'beyond parody'[1]. Example:

http://wordpress.rideapart.com/2018/...ury-reduction/

[1] this woman coined the phrase:
http://www.1490wlfn.com/vicki_mckenna.html

She's one of your people, Frank, but doesn't use her Polish
name professionally.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #17  
Old March 19th 18, 09:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default milling machine

On 3/19/2018 1:47 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE


A good choice for doing what?


In another thread was the question, how do they
cut aluminium tubes so that they fit together
before welding, e.g. the top and down tube to
the head tube? And the answer is a
milling machine (and not a press drill).

I'm sure the Luna is a good choice for
"doing it" only the person who has to pay for
it might disagree


An easier question. Just ring up Andy Newlands:

http://www.strawberrybicycle.com/gal...hetti&id=ML314

http://www.strawberrybicycle.com/gal...hetti&id=ML317

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #18  
Old March 20th 18, 01:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 12:43:45 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 19:47:27 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE

A good choice for doing what?


In another thread was the question,


I don't read every thread.

how do they
cut aluminium tubes so that they fit together
before welding, e.g. the top and down tube to
the head tube? And the answer is a
milling machine (and not a press drill).


It's called "mitering":
https://www.google.com/search?q=mitering+bicycle+tubes
A mill with an tiltable head is probably the easiest way to do it.
I've watched the process, but have never done it myself. It can also
be done with a lathe. I don't know if a drill press will work,
probably not. Forget about using a tubing notcher. If the metal is
soft enough for a notcher to work, then it's not strong enough to
ride.

I'm sure the Luna is a good choice for
"doing it" only the person who has to pay for
it might disagree


I don't know anything about Luna mills. Mitering bicycle tubes does
not require fabulous precision. A Chinese benchtop mill could be used
if you're cheap or desperate. The accuracy is mostly in the jigs and
fixtures.


A file is accurate enough :-)

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #19  
Old March 20th 18, 01:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 12:21:41 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 14:13:04 +0700, John B.
wrote:

To be honest I can't think of anything I ever did on a horizontal or
vertical milling machine that would have benefited by having CNC :-)

A lathe, yes, if only turning the balls to put on the ends of a vise
handle, but all the milling I can remember doing was pretty much
straight cuts.

What does the guy plan on doing with the mill?


Small production runs. He's the retired owner of Santa Cruz
Precision:
http://santacruzprecision.com
Some of the machines from the old business are now in his garage.
Most of the stuff he did was designed on a computah using and old
version of SmartCAM.
http://www.smartcamcnc.com
Some of the complex shapes could not have easily been done without the
computer. Same with making multiple parts for short run manufacture.
What inspired this project is that he's getting requests for quotes
from former customers where the profits from 1 or 2 jobs would easily
pay for the CNC conversion. Since the old Bandit CNC controller was
almost dead, it seemed like a good way to go. Right now, we're a bit
stalled due to various personal commitments.

More on the mill:
http://www.buildyouridea.com/cnc/Shizuoka/Shizuoka.html

My payment for doing the computers, electrical and motors is that I
get to use the mill to make custom knives. Something like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98ly5-1bhHU (0:00 to 4:30)


I thought that you "knife guys" hand forged the blades. At least that
was what Jesse Clift did when he made what was probably the original
Bowie knife :-)

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #20  
Old March 20th 18, 01:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default milling machine

On 3/19/2018 8:09 PM, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 12:43:45 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 19:47:27 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE

A good choice for doing what?


In another thread was the question,


I don't read every thread.

how do they
cut aluminium tubes so that they fit together
before welding, e.g. the top and down tube to
the head tube? And the answer is a
milling machine (and not a press drill).


It's called "mitering":
https://www.google.com/search?q=mitering+bicycle+tubes
A mill with an tiltable head is probably the easiest way to do it.
I've watched the process, but have never done it myself. It can also
be done with a lathe. I don't know if a drill press will work,
probably not. Forget about using a tubing notcher. If the metal is
soft enough for a notcher to work, then it's not strong enough to
ride.

I'm sure the Luna is a good choice for
"doing it" only the person who has to pay for
it might disagree


I don't know anything about Luna mills. Mitering bicycle tubes does
not require fabulous precision. A Chinese benchtop mill could be used
if you're cheap or desperate. The accuracy is mostly in the jigs and
fixtures.


A file is accurate enough :-)


+1

Since I'm in the 'no two alike' frame repair business, I can
miter a top tube at both ends to length with a file faster
than the setup on a general purpose mill.

http://www.yellowjersey.org/gth8.jpg

If you're making a lot of frames to the same geometry, a
Marchetti & Lange machine is what you want, but that is not
Mr Berg.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


 




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