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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #881  
Old January 13th 19, 05:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 550
Default AG: Hokey Smoke is it Saturday Already?

On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 22:46:07 -0500, Joy Beeson
wrote:


I'll write something tomorrow.


Question. I have a recipe calling for "Cider Vinegar". Ignoring the
taste is there any difference in acidity between cider vinegar and the
(normal here) 5% acidity vinegar?

cheers,

John B.


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  #882  
Old January 14th 19, 03:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,209
Default AG: Hokey Smoke is it Saturday Already?

On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 11:00:58 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

I have a recipe calling for "Cider Vinegar". Ignoring the
taste is there any difference in acidity between cider vinegar and the
(normal here) 5% acidity vinegar?


Most of the cider vinegar sold here is "diluted with water to a
uniform strength of 5% acidity".

I bought some 12% rice vinegar at Kim's Oriental once, but that's a
two day's drive now and I haven't been able to find any vinegar at
International Foods, so I've been booping up my garlic vinegar with
ascorbic acid.

Malt vinegar (which the dictionary tells me should be called alegar)
is slightly exotic here. Wine vinegar is fairly easy to come by, and
I've found some exotics such as sherry vinegar, mostly at Sherman &
Lin's expired-date grocery. (I find all sorts of neat stuff at
Sherman & Lin's.)

I reserve distilled vinegar (aka "white" vinegar) for cleaning -- and
at least once I've seen it in the cleaning-products aisle. I always
thought it was the vinegar that was distilled, but somewhere or the
other I read that "distilled" means that it's fermented from distilled
spirits.

So I looked it up in Wikipedia. US "distilled" vinegar is made from
pure alcohol; UK distilled vinegar is malt vinegar that has been
distilled to remove the color.

What vinegars are common in Thailand?

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #883  
Old January 14th 19, 06:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 550
Default AG: Hokey Smoke is it Saturday Already?

On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 21:45:42 -0500, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 11:00:58 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

I have a recipe calling for "Cider Vinegar". Ignoring the
taste is there any difference in acidity between cider vinegar and the
(normal here) 5% acidity vinegar?


Most of the cider vinegar sold here is "diluted with water to a
uniform strength of 5% acidity".

I bought some 12% rice vinegar at Kim's Oriental once, but that's a
two day's drive now and I haven't been able to find any vinegar at
International Foods, so I've been booping up my garlic vinegar with
ascorbic acid.

Malt vinegar (which the dictionary tells me should be called alegar)
is slightly exotic here. Wine vinegar is fairly easy to come by, and
I've found some exotics such as sherry vinegar, mostly at Sherman &
Lin's expired-date grocery. (I find all sorts of neat stuff at
Sherman & Lin's.)

I reserve distilled vinegar (aka "white" vinegar) for cleaning -- and
at least once I've seen it in the cleaning-products aisle. I always
thought it was the vinegar that was distilled, but somewhere or the
other I read that "distilled" means that it's fermented from distilled
spirits.

So I looked it up in Wikipedia. US "distilled" vinegar is made from
pure alcohol; UK distilled vinegar is malt vinegar that has been
distilled to remove the color.

What vinegars are common in Thailand?


The most common vinegar here is a white vinegar that sells for as
cheap as 10 baht a bottle - 30 cents U.S. My wife doesn't use this but
uses "rice vinegar" which costs 57.50 baht ~$1.72 a 700 ml. bottle.
But this is in a grocery store that sells mainly Thai food. We also
have stores that specialize in foreign foods (at higher prices) that
stock all sorts of vinegars. These store originally catered to
foreigners living in Thailand but the middle and upper classes now
patronize them to the extent that (I'd guess) 90+ percent of their
business is from Locals.

As an aside, when I first came to Thailand there were no grocery
stores, food was bought fresh in the open market each morning and
eaten the same day it was purchased. Shortly after we were married I
bought a refrigerator and my wife was appalled... was I going to start
drinking beer? When I told her that she could buy several day's food
and store it in the 'fridge she initially didn't believe me. "Day old
food? You think I'm going to feed my husband day old food?"


Cheers,
John B.


 




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