A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

183.9mph



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old September 21st 18, 07:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 254
Default 183.9mph

On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 10:04:37 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/21/2018 11:23 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 8:10:25 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/19/2018 10:04 AM,
wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 5:56:28 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/18/2018 7:44 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 7:34:46 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
Snipped

Yes and Murphy cheated death that day, being pulled up into
the train car at he very last second. We all grew up with
Jose Meiffret's adventures:
http://capovelo.com/historic-footage...d-record-1952/

and of course John Howard's 1980s attempts. But this, I
think, is truly a step beyond. Hats off to her!



Interesting that #1 the front fork rake is reversed from what we're used to and #2 the front tire is off the rim after the crash. Was it the front tire coming off the rim that caused that crash?


Right, speed record bikes have very different geometry - the
very last thing you want is snappy handling.

I don't know about the tire but tires/tubes/valves are a
real problem as we don't have 'speed rated' products for our
wheels as racing cars and motorcycles enjoy.

John Howard's Schrader valve pins depressed at some high
RPM, the solution being a classic metal valve cap with
rubber liner.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...-record-of-15/


We were just talking about that yesterday. I think that Goodyear makes speed record tires for most records. I understand that Goodyear is about to start making normal bicycle tires again.


Such that "making" means buying them from the low bidder in
Asia, then yes.



Do you mean like most of the other tire manufacturers?


Some yes and some no.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Considering that there are some 87 tire manufacturers in the world that isn't very informative nor difficult to claim.
Ads
  #22  
Old September 23rd 18, 01:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 68
Default 183.9mph

On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 1:49:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 10:04:37 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/21/2018 11:23 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 8:10:25 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/19/2018 10:04 AM,
wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 5:56:28 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/18/2018 7:44 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 7:34:46 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
Snipped

Yes and Murphy cheated death that day, being pulled up into
the train car at he very last second. We all grew up with
Jose Meiffret's adventures:
http://capovelo.com/historic-footage...d-record-1952/

and of course John Howard's 1980s attempts. But this, I
think, is truly a step beyond. Hats off to her!



Interesting that #1 the front fork rake is reversed from what we're used to and #2 the front tire is off the rim after the crash. Was it the front tire coming off the rim that caused that crash?


Right, speed record bikes have very different geometry - the
very last thing you want is snappy handling.

I don't know about the tire but tires/tubes/valves are a
real problem as we don't have 'speed rated' products for our
wheels as racing cars and motorcycles enjoy.

John Howard's Schrader valve pins depressed at some high
RPM, the solution being a classic metal valve cap with
rubber liner.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...-record-of-15/


We were just talking about that yesterday. I think that Goodyear makes speed record tires for most records. I understand that Goodyear is about to start making normal bicycle tires again.


Such that "making" means buying them from the low bidder in
Asia, then yes.



Do you mean like most of the other tire manufacturers?


Some yes and some no.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Considering that there are some 87 tire manufacturers in the world that isn't very informative nor difficult to claim.


In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at 100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

From that point she was riding in the slipstream of the dragster for 3.5 miles, achieving the record average of 183.9 mph over the last mile.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy
  #23  
Old September 23rd 18, 06:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 164
Default 183.9mph

Andy wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 1:49:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 10:04:37 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/21/2018 11:23 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 8:10:25 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/19/2018 10:04 AM,
wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 5:56:28 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/18/2018 7:44 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 7:34:46 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
Snipped

Yes and Murphy cheated death that day, being pulled up into
the train car at he very last second. We all grew up with
Jose Meiffret's adventures:
http://capovelo.com/historic-footage...d-record-1952/

and of course John Howard's 1980s attempts. But this, I
think, is truly a step beyond. Hats off to her!



Interesting that #1 the front fork rake is reversed from what
we're used to and #2 the front tire is off the rim after the
crash. Was it the front tire coming off the rim that caused that crash?


Right, speed record bikes have very different geometry - the
very last thing you want is snappy handling.

I don't know about the tire but tires/tubes/valves are a
real problem as we don't have 'speed rated' products for our
wheels as racing cars and motorcycles enjoy.

John Howard's Schrader valve pins depressed at some high
RPM, the solution being a classic metal valve cap with
rubber liner.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...-record-of-15/


We were just talking about that yesterday. I think that Goodyear
makes speed record tires for most records. I understand that
Goodyear is about to start making normal bicycle tires again.


Such that "making" means buying them from the low bidder in
Asia, then yes.



Do you mean like most of the other tire manufacturers?


Some yes and some no.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Considering that there are some 87 tire manufacturers in the world that
isn't very informative nor difficult to claim.


In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national
track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at
100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

From that point she was riding in the slipstream of the dragster for 3.5
miles, achieving the record average of 183.9 mph over the last mile.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy


Well, if you're going to accept using a dragster to counteract aerodynamic
drag for you, what's a little tow up to 100 mph. Just think of it as a
"sticky bottle".

  #24  
Old September 23rd 18, 08:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 121
Default 183.9mph

On Sun, 23 Sep 2018 05:46:20 +0000 (UTC), Ralph Barone
wrote:

Andy wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 1:49:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 10:04:37 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/21/2018 11:23 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 8:10:25 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/19/2018 10:04 AM,
wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 5:56:28 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/18/2018 7:44 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 7:34:46 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
Snipped

Yes and Murphy cheated death that day, being pulled up into
the train car at he very last second. We all grew up with
Jose Meiffret's adventures:
http://capovelo.com/historic-footage...d-record-1952/

and of course John Howard's 1980s attempts. But this, I
think, is truly a step beyond. Hats off to her!



Interesting that #1 the front fork rake is reversed from what
we're used to and #2 the front tire is off the rim after the
crash. Was it the front tire coming off the rim that caused that crash?


Right, speed record bikes have very different geometry - the
very last thing you want is snappy handling.

I don't know about the tire but tires/tubes/valves are a
real problem as we don't have 'speed rated' products for our
wheels as racing cars and motorcycles enjoy.

John Howard's Schrader valve pins depressed at some high
RPM, the solution being a classic metal valve cap with
rubber liner.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...-record-of-15/


We were just talking about that yesterday. I think that Goodyear
makes speed record tires for most records. I understand that
Goodyear is about to start making normal bicycle tires again.


Such that "making" means buying them from the low bidder in
Asia, then yes.



Do you mean like most of the other tire manufacturers?


Some yes and some no.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Considering that there are some 87 tire manufacturers in the world that
isn't very informative nor difficult to claim.


In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national
track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at
100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

From that point she was riding in the slipstream of the dragster for 3.5
miles, achieving the record average of 183.9 mph over the last mile.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy


Well, if you're going to accept using a dragster to counteract aerodynamic
drag for you, what's a little tow up to 100 mph. Just think of it as a
"sticky bottle".


Without the dragster in front would one be able to stay on the bicycle
at 183 MPH?

My "Science of Cycling" app says that in still air it would require
some 72020 watts of power to ride at 183 mph without the dragster, or
about 1032 calories per minute :-)
--
Cheers

John B.
  #25  
Old September 23rd 18, 01:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 164
Default 183.9mph

John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 23 Sep 2018 05:46:20 +0000 (UTC), Ralph Barone
wrote:

Andy wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 1:49:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 10:04:37 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/21/2018 11:23 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 8:10:25 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/19/2018 10:04 AM,
wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 5:56:28 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/18/2018 7:44 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 7:34:46 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
Snipped

Yes and Murphy cheated death that day, being pulled up into
the train car at he very last second. We all grew up with
Jose Meiffret's adventures:
http://capovelo.com/historic-footage...d-record-1952/

and of course John Howard's 1980s attempts. But this, I
think, is truly a step beyond. Hats off to her!



Interesting that #1 the front fork rake is reversed from what
we're used to and #2 the front tire is off the rim after the
crash. Was it the front tire coming off the rim that caused that crash?


Right, speed record bikes have very different geometry - the
very last thing you want is snappy handling.

I don't know about the tire but tires/tubes/valves are a
real problem as we don't have 'speed rated' products for our
wheels as racing cars and motorcycles enjoy.

John Howard's Schrader valve pins depressed at some high
RPM, the solution being a classic metal valve cap with
rubber liner.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...-record-of-15/


We were just talking about that yesterday. I think that Goodyear
makes speed record tires for most records. I understand that
Goodyear is about to start making normal bicycle tires again.


Such that "making" means buying them from the low bidder in
Asia, then yes.



Do you mean like most of the other tire manufacturers?


Some yes and some no.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Considering that there are some 87 tire manufacturers in the world that
isn't very informative nor difficult to claim.

In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national
track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at
100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

From that point she was riding in the slipstream of the dragster for 3.5
miles, achieving the record average of 183.9 mph over the last mile.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy


Well, if you're going to accept using a dragster to counteract aerodynamic
drag for you, what's a little tow up to 100 mph. Just think of it as a
"sticky bottle".


Without the dragster in front would one be able to stay on the bicycle
at 183 MPH?

My "Science of Cycling" app says that in still air it would require
some 72020 watts of power to ride at 183 mph without the dragster, or
about 1032 calories per minute :-)
--
Cheers

John B.


That's only 100 hp. Take your ACME leg vitamins and start training.

https://youtu.be/kM-91sthsaE

  #26  
Old September 23rd 18, 05:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,349
Default 183.9mph

On Saturday, September 22, 2018 at 7:47:11 PM UTC-5, Andy wrote:

In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at 100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy


She was towed to 163 mph, idiot. Watch the second video I posted above. BIG difference between 100 and 163, moron.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CFTqHbgsKs
  #27  
Old September 23rd 18, 10:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 68
Default 183.9mph

On Sunday, September 23, 2018 at 11:51:00 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, September 22, 2018 at 7:47:11 PM UTC-5, Andy wrote:

In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at 100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy


She was towed to 163 mph, idiot. Watch the second video I posted above. BIG difference between 100 and 163, moron.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CFTqHbgsKs


https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-l...t/art-20045434
  #28  
Old September 24th 18, 04:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 254
Default 183.9mph

On Saturday, September 22, 2018 at 5:47:11 PM UTC-7, Andy wrote:
On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 1:49:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:


Considering that there are some 87 tire manufacturers in the world that isn't very informative nor difficult to claim.


In order to reach her record-breaking speed, the former US national track, road and mountain bike champion was pulled along by tow rope at 100 mph, before being released to pedal herself.

From that point she was riding in the slipstream of the dragster for 3.5 miles, achieving the record average of 183.9 mph over the last mile.

She only achieved 183 mph AFTER being towed to 100 mph.

Andy


My point is that at those speeds tires overheat and throw the entire rubber tread off. So it requires specially built high speed tires that are like racing tires and have a tread that weighs nearly nothing so that there's no centrifugal weight effect enough to peel it off.

And I believe that she had to be towed up closer to 150 mph to be able to turn that gear over with enough force to remain in the slip stream.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.