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Does anything dissolve paint thinner



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 2nd 19, 07:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 154
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.

Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of those chain cleaners.

Thanks,
Andy
  #2  
Old September 2nd 19, 08:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,116
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.


Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #3  
Old September 2nd 19, 08:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,242
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 12:38:12 PM UTC-7, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.


Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


Solvents to remove solvents? Is that a thing? If he chooses to use alcohol, what should he use to remove that? Is it solvent infinite regress?

And then there is Plan B: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6mzE5lQ0w He has an accent. Believe him.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #4  
Old September 2nd 19, 10:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 154
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 2:48:33 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 12:38:12 PM UTC-7, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.


Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


Solvents to remove solvents? Is that a thing? If he chooses to use alcohol, what should he use to remove that? Is it solvent infinite regress?

And then there is Plan B: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6mzE5lQ0w He has an accent. Believe him.

-- Jay Beattie.


Thanks for the video. It is very helpful.

Andy

I did find a homemade water based cleaner recipe that worked well.

8 oz. water
1 Tbsp Vinegar
1 Tbsp Baking Soda
1 Tsp Dish Soap
  #5  
Old September 2nd 19, 11:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 942
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 12:48:33 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 12:38:12 PM UTC-7, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.


Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


Solvents to remove solvents? Is that a thing? If he chooses to use alcohol, what should he use to remove that? Is it solvent infinite regress?

And then there is Plan B: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6mzE5lQ0w He has an accent. Believe him.

-- Jay Beattie.


I often remove alcohol - from the bottle and into a nice glass. Cabernet is good Bordeaux as well.

But I think that he has the idea that when he cuts the grease he needs to wash the solvent off in some manner with all of that sludge.

And the answer is a very strong soap and hot water. Use rubber gloves since most dishwashing detergent is designed to cut all oil and will take all of the oils out of your skin and fingernails. In automotive supply stores they have an extremely strong detergent that is in a blue bottle. Rather than using paint thinner on a chain, you put about a cup full of that stuff in a 4 sup measuring cup and put your dirty chain in there and let it sit for 15 minutes and then wash it off with a hose into the gutter. DO NOT let that stuff touch your hands since it makes dishwashing detergent look like spring water.
  #6  
Old September 4th 19, 01:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 563
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On 9/2/2019 12:48 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:
I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?


Solvents to remove solvents? Is that a thing? If he chooses to use alcohol, what should he use to remove that? Is it solvent infinite regress?

And then there is Plan B: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6mzE5lQ0w He has an accent. Believe him.

-- Jay Beattie.


Solvents for solvents:

When I was an undergrad intern at an electronics research facility, we
(I) had to ultra-clean items for use in vacuum. Leave bits of oil on
them, and they "out-gas," degrading the vacuum, or so I was told.

IIRC, the sequence was: 1) ?Alkanox? Alkaline cleaner - seemed like
Comet -- & water, ultrasonic for xx minutes. Then 2) Chlorinated
solvent (TCE??), ultrasonic for xx minutes. Then 3) Acetone,
ultrasonic, then 4) Methanol, ultrasonic. All under the vent hood, of
course. Drop something in between steps, you start all over.

So yes, solvents for solvents, but you probably don't need to
ultra-clean your chain, and I suspect you'd never succeed anyway.

My current chain-cleaning ritual:

1) Soak in (fairly dirty) mineral spirits overnight, in capped 2 liter
soda bottle. This thins the grease/muck.

2) Put chain in the heated ultrasonic cleaner (I splurged last year)
with a pretty concentrated mix of Simple Green and water, for something
like 10 minutes. This seems to get out the grit; I don't have the nerve
to put flammable solvents in the heated cheapo ultrasonic.

3) Rinse with fresh warm water in another 2 liter bottle, shake
vigorously. Maybe change water and rinse again.

4) Blow dry with jet from compressor (this year's splurge), then hang to
dry overnight.

Elapsed time is pretty long, but actual work time is under 10 minutes,
perhaps under 5. If I need to add an obsessive step, it would be to
rinse with clear water in the ultrasonic, but draining/refilling the
ultrasonic would take actual time.

Got a gravel bike last spring that I --gasp-- ride on gravel, and the
chain gets pretty dirty pretty fast, so I need to clean more often than
I did in my pure-roadie days.

Mark J.
  #7  
Old September 2nd 19, 10:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 154
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 2:38:12 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.


Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


You must never have used IPA on grease.

It does not dissolve grease, it requires an organic solvent.

Andy
  #8  
Old September 2nd 19, 10:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,116
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 14:05:02 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 2:38:12 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.


Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


You must never have used IPA on grease.


Actually, I have. It works well at dissolving hydrocarbon based
non-polar greases. It's also good for removing silicon grease from
CPU's and heat sinks. Not so good as a pre-wash for removing grease
stains.

It does not dissolve grease, it requires an organic solvent.
Andy


Alcohol is an organic solvent because it contains carbon linked to
hydrogen, oxygen, or nitrogen (except for carbonates, cyanides,
carbides, etc).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isopropyl_alcohol
...it is used widely as a solvent and as a cleaning
fluid, especially for dissolving oils

isopropyl alcohol vs degreaser
https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/isopropyl-alcohol-vs-degreaser/
IPA is a solvent, it dissolves grease (and water, and anything
else) into itself, so you can wipe it away.

Degreaser is a surfactant, so it allows the grease/oil
to form microscopic globules in the water, which you then
wash or wipe away. It’s essentially concentrated soap.

Both will do the same job, but degreaser works better at
stripping large amounts of gunk off drivechains as the
degreaser and oil form an emulsion, which you can then wash
away. If you put IPA in a chain cleaner you’d just be diluting
the oil and it still wouldn’t wash off. IPA works best for
removing small amounts of gunk, or where you don’t want to
leave a trace of soap/water afterwards for example cleaning
calipers and levers after bleeding brakes, or sloshing around
in suspension forks to remove the last traces of the old oil
and any dirt.

By the way, you're welcome.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #9  
Old September 3rd 19, 02:28 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 154
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 4:49:25 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 14:05:02 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 2:38:12 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 11:51:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I use paint thinner and an old tooth brush to clean my bike chain.
Is there anything I can spray on the chain to dissolve the thinner
or do I have to manually rub it off with a rag?

I am open to recommendations to anyone who actually uses one of
those chain cleaners.

Paint thinner is a solvent (mineral spirits) and is rather slow
to evaporate.

Solvent Evaporation Rate Strength
(Minutes) (KB Value)
Denatured 91% Alcohol 3 Limited Solvency
VM & P Naphtha 4 38
Lacquer Thinner 2 100
Paint Thinner
or Mineral Spirits 60 35
Toluene 3.5 105
Xylene 12 98
Acetone 1 Infinite
MEK 2 Infinite
Turpentine 40 55
Kerosene 325 30

Some of the above are banned in the People's Republic of California by
the VoC Ban. If you want a fast clean, with low residue, methinks
acetone would be the best bet. Mixing it with paint thinner isn't
going to do anything useful. When the acetone evaporates, what's left
is the paint thinner, which will then slowly evaporate.

You might also want to try lacquer thinner. However, the modern stuff
is a mix of other solvents, which can vary:
https://ecolink.com/info/differences-between-lacquer-thinner-11-lacquer-thinner-48-and-lacquer-thinner-51/

Both acetone and lacquer thinner will attack plastics, rubber, and
some paints. If the area where you're working has any of these, don't
use these solvents. 91% IPA alcohol is evaporates quickly and is
probably good enough.

While you're at it:
1. Use gloves
2. Read the safety warnings
3. Use a respirator or do your cleaning outdoors.
4. Think about buying a parts washer:
https://www.harborfreight.com/20-gal-parts-washer-with-pump-60769.html
https://blastercorp.com/product/parts-washer-solvent/


You must never have used IPA on grease.


Actually, I have. It works well at dissolving hydrocarbon based
non-polar greases. It's also good for removing silicon grease from
CPU's and heat sinks. Not so good as a pre-wash for removing grease
stains.

It does not dissolve grease, it requires an organic solvent.
Andy


Alcohol is an organic solvent because it contains carbon linked to
hydrogen, oxygen, or nitrogen (except for carbonates, cyanides,
carbides, etc).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isopropyl_alcohol
...it is used widely as a solvent and as a cleaning
fluid, especially for dissolving oils

isopropyl alcohol vs degreaser
https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/isopropyl-alcohol-vs-degreaser/
IPA is a solvent, it dissolves grease (and water, and anything
else) into itself, so you can wipe it away.

Degreaser is a surfactant, so it allows the grease/oil
to form microscopic globules in the water, which you then
wash or wipe away. It’s essentially concentrated soap.

Both will do the same job, but degreaser works better at
stripping large amounts of gunk off drivechains as the
degreaser and oil form an emulsion, which you can then wash
away. If you put IPA in a chain cleaner you’d just be diluting
the oil and it still wouldn’t wash off. IPA works best for
removing small amounts of gunk, or where you don’t want to
leave a trace of soap/water afterwards for example cleaning
calipers and levers after bleeding brakes, or sloshing around
in suspension forks to remove the last traces of the old oil
and any dirt.

By the way, you're welcome.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


isopropyl alcohol vs degreaser
https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/isopropyl-alcohol-vs-degreaser/
IPA is a solvent, it dissolves grease (and water, and anything
else) into itself, so you can wipe it away.

I am a retired chemist with over 35 years of experience.

And I had to dissolve many substances in order to run analyses and clean equipment.

You can say all you want, but IPA NEVER HAS and NEVER WILL dissolve oils and greases.

Andy

  #10  
Old September 3rd 19, 04:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,116
Default Does anything dissolve paint thinner

On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 18:28:52 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Monday, September 2, 2019 at 4:49:25 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 2 Sep 2019 14:05:02 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:
You must never have used IPA on grease.


Actually, I have. It works well at dissolving hydrocarbon based
non-polar greases. It's also good for removing silicon grease from
CPU's and heat sinks. Not so good as a pre-wash for removing grease
stains.

It does not dissolve grease, it requires an organic solvent.
Andy


Alcohol is an organic solvent because it contains carbon linked to
hydrogen, oxygen, or nitrogen (except for carbonates, cyanides,
carbides, etc).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isopropyl_alcohol
...it is used widely as a solvent and as a cleaning
fluid, especially for dissolving oils

isopropyl alcohol vs degreaser
https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/isopropyl-alcohol-vs-degreaser/
IPA is a solvent, it dissolves grease (and water, and anything
else) into itself, so you can wipe it away.

Degreaser is a surfactant, so it allows the grease/oil
to form microscopic globules in the water, which you then
wash or wipe away. It’s essentially concentrated soap.

Both will do the same job, but degreaser works better at
stripping large amounts of gunk off drivechains as the
degreaser and oil form an emulsion, which you can then wash
away. If you put IPA in a chain cleaner you’d just be diluting
the oil and it still wouldn’t wash off. IPA works best for
removing small amounts of gunk, or where you don’t want to
leave a trace of soap/water afterwards for example cleaning
calipers and levers after bleeding brakes, or sloshing around
in suspension forks to remove the last traces of the old oil
and any dirt.

By the way, you're welcome.


isopropyl alcohol vs degreaser
https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/isopropyl-alcohol-vs-degreaser/
IPA is a solvent, it dissolves grease (and water, and anything
else) into itself, so you can wipe it away.


I am a retired chemist with over 35 years of experience.
And I had to dissolve many substances in order to run analyses and clean equipment.
You can say all you want, but IPA NEVER HAS and NEVER WILL dissolve oils and greases.
Andy


Well, I guess I'll just have to try it. Found a tiny 50 ml beaker and
added 10 ml of 91% IPA. I then dumped in a dime size blob of whatever
greases I could find around the house. I then stirred the solution
lightly (no stirring rod). If the grease dissolved into the IPA, then
IPA can be used as a solvent to clean it. If it remained mostly
intact, it's insoluble.

After that, I found a white pine board, and ground a dime size spot of
grease into the board with my thumb. I then wiped it clean with a
paper towel. In all cases, there was some residue embedded in the
wood. I then used a different paper towel to try and clean off the
residue. If IPA was able to clean the embedded grease, then I would
consider IPA a solvent.

Soluble? Pine board
Lithium white grease. Yes Yes
10-30wt engine oil. No Somewhat
WD-40 No No
3-in-one oil. Yes Yes
Unlabelled gear lube. Somewhat Yes
Moly disulfide grease. No No
Al2O3 thermal goo. Yes Most but not all
LPS3 (wax film lube). Yes Yes
Mystery black grease gun. Yes Most but not all

The results showing "most but not all" seem to have left a solid
particle residue in the grain of the wood which I could not remove
with IPA and scrubbing. The greasy carrier was removed, but not the
solid particles.

Sorry, no photos because I didn't want to get grease all over my
smartphone or camera. Maybe if I can dig up an accomplice, I can make
a YouTube video and become famous.

If I wanted to do it correctly, I would use a viscosity tester
(tilting glass slide). Or, I could stir more vigorously, and use a
centrifuge to see if the grease and IPA could be separated. If I feel
ambitious or someone has a better idea, I can easily re-run the tests
and add a few more greases that are more likely to be found on a
bicycle chain.

I can't conclude anything either way with what I'll readily admit are
two rather lousy tests. Offhand, it would seem that some greases and
oils will not dissolve in IPA, while others will to varying degrees.

Meanwhile, I'll burn some time pondering all the web sites
recommending IPA for grease and stain removal:
https://www.google.com/search?q=alcohol+grease+removal


Drivel: One thing that 91% IPA is good for is removing the sticky
depolymerized rubber goo (paint) from the surface of computer
keyboards, mice, toys, etc. (Thank you Logitech). I've had to
recycle or toss far too much of this stuff simply because I couldn't
remove the sticky goo. IPA works, but does require some heavy duty
scrubbing. What's left is bare plastic, but that's better than
dealing with the sticky rubberish mess.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 




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