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Health and cycling



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 11th 15, 07:11 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bod[_5_]
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Posts: 3,140
Default Health and cycling

"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.
On average, regular cycle commuters take more than one day per year less
off sick than colleagues who do not cycle to work, saving UK businesses
around £83m annually. Also, people who do not cycle-commute regularly
have a 39% higher mortality rate than those who do."

http://www.ctc.org.uk/campaigning/vi...th-and-cycling
--
Bod
Ads
  #2  
Old July 11th 15, 08:30 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
David Lang
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Posts: 1,816
Default Health and cycling

On 11/07/2015 07:11, Bod wrote:
"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.


People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
mental ability
equivalent to someone 10 years old.



  #3  
Old July 11th 15, 09:13 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Alycidon
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Posts: 3,921
Default Health and cycling

On Saturday, 11 July 2015 07:11:22 UTC+1, Bod wrote:
"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.
On average, regular cycle commuters take more than one day per year less
off sick than colleagues who do not cycle to work, saving UK businesses
around £83m annually. Also, people who do not cycle-commute regularly
have a 39% higher mortality rate than those who do."

http://www.ctc.org.uk/campaigning/vi...th-and-cycling
--
Bod


Indeed - when I retired at 56 I was 11st 11lbs with a BMI of 21. Many of my car bound contempories were 18st+.
  #4  
Old July 11th 15, 09:44 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bod[_5_]
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Posts: 3,140
Default Health and cycling

On 11/07/2015 09:13, Alycidon wrote:
On Saturday, 11 July 2015 07:11:22 UTC+1, Bod wrote:
"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.
On average, regular cycle commuters take more than one day per year less
off sick than colleagues who do not cycle to work, saving UK businesses
around £83m annually. Also, people who do not cycle-commute regularly
have a 39% higher mortality rate than those who do."

http://www.ctc.org.uk/campaigning/vi...th-and-cycling
--
Bod


Indeed - when I retired at 56 I was 11st 11lbs with a BMI of 21. Many of my car bound contempories were 18st+.

Agreed, most of the people who don't cycle are well overweight here.
I've still got a 32" waist, just under 11st stone and a flat tum tum. :-)
  #5  
Old July 11th 15, 11:53 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Peter Keller[_3_]
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Posts: 8,313
Default Health and cycling

On Sat, 11 Jul 2015 08:30:39 +0100, David Lang wrote:

People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
mental ability
equivalent to someone 10 years old.


Thanks greatly kind sir for that excellent snide comment cumming from you.
Now please ejaculate to me from you the further excellent snide
compliment of having the personality of wallpaper.
  #6  
Old July 11th 15, 11:26 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Judith[_4_]
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Posts: 11,000
Default Health and cycling

On Sat, 11 Jul 2015 07:11:20 +0100, Bod wrote:

"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.


On the other hand

For men, the health benefits of bicycling may involve a troublesome trade-off.
While riding a bicycle burns calories and improves cardiovascular fitness, too
many hours on a bicycle saddle can compress the artery and vital nerves leading
to the penis.

The result? A risk of numbness, pain, and erectile dysfunction.

A male cyclist can place a significant percentage of his weight on his
perineum, an area between the scrotum and the anus where the nerves and
arteries to the penis pass. This pressure -- and a narrow saddle seat -- can
injure the arteries and nerves.

"The earliest warning sign is numbness or tingling," says Irwin Goldstein, MD,
director of San Diego Sexual Medicine.

Even a young man may lose the ability to achieve an erection, says Goldstein
  #7  
Old July 11th 15, 11:59 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
David Lang
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Posts: 1,816
Default Health and cycling

On 11/07/2015 23:26, Judith wrote:
On Sat, 11 Jul 2015 07:11:20 +0100, Bod wrote:

"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.


On the other hand

For men, the health benefits of bicycling may involve a troublesome trade-off.
While riding a bicycle burns calories and improves cardiovascular fitness, too
many hours on a bicycle saddle can compress the artery and vital nerves leading
to the penis.

The result? A risk of numbness, pain, and erectile dysfunction.

A male cyclist can place a significant percentage of his weight on his
perineum, an area between the scrotum and the anus where the nerves and
arteries to the penis pass. This pressure -- and a narrow saddle seat -- can
injure the arteries and nerves.

"The earliest warning sign is numbness or tingling," says Irwin Goldstein, MD,
director of San Diego Sexual Medicine.

Even a young man may lose the ability to achieve an erection, says Goldstein

Darwinism in action.
  #8  
Old July 12th 15, 10:23 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Nick[_4_]
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Posts: 1,323
Default Health and cycling

On 11/07/2015 23:26, Judith wrote:
On Sat, 11 Jul 2015 07:11:20 +0100, Bod wrote:

"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.


On the other hand

For men, the health benefits of bicycling may involve a troublesome trade-off.
While riding a bicycle burns calories and improves cardiovascular fitness, too
many hours on a bicycle saddle can compress the artery and vital nerves leading
to the penis.

The result? A risk of numbness, pain, and erectile dysfunction.

A male cyclist can place a significant percentage of his weight on his
perineum, an area between the scrotum and the anus where the nerves and
arteries to the penis pass. This pressure -- and a narrow saddle seat -- can
injure the arteries and nerves.

"The earliest warning sign is numbness or tingling," says Irwin Goldstein, MD,
director of San Diego Sexual Medicine.

Even a young man may lose the ability to achieve an erection, says Goldstein


I think road bike seats got much better in this respect about 10 years
ago. I don't get numbness like I used.

This later report did not find a relationship between ED and cycling.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jomh.2014.0012



  #9  
Old July 12th 15, 10:35 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Alycidon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,921
Default Health and cycling

On Sunday, 12 July 2015 10:23:45 UTC+1, Nick wrote:


I think road bike seats got much better in this respect about 10 years
ago. I don't get numbness like I used.


Nor does this fella (obviously).

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/...42_634x438.jpg
  #10  
Old July 12th 15, 11:18 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
David Lang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,816
Default Health and cycling

On 12/07/2015 10:23, Nick wrote:
On 11/07/2015 23:26, Judith wrote:
On Sat, 11 Jul 2015 07:11:20 +0100, Bod wrote:

"People who cycle regularly in mid-adulthood typically enjoy a level of
fitness equivalent to someone 10 years younger and their life expectancy
is two years above the average.


On the other hand

For men, the health benefits of bicycling may involve a troublesome
trade-off.
While riding a bicycle burns calories and improves cardiovascular
fitness, too
many hours on a bicycle saddle can compress the artery and vital
nerves leading
to the penis.

The result? A risk of numbness, pain, and erectile dysfunction.

A male cyclist can place a significant percentage of his weight on his
perineum, an area between the scrotum and the anus where the nerves and
arteries to the penis pass. This pressure -- and a narrow saddle seat
-- can
injure the arteries and nerves.

"The earliest warning sign is numbness or tingling," says Irwin
Goldstein, MD,
director of San Diego Sexual Medicine.

Even a young man may lose the ability to achieve an erection, says
Goldstein


I think road bike seats got much better in this respect about 10 years
ago. I don't get numbness like I used.

This later report did not find a relationship between ED and cycling.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jomh.2014.0012



Not that it matters. Cyclists are such a target for ridicule no woman
would be interested.
 




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