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Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 27th 19, 10:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Max Demian
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Posts: 22
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see?* What’s so special about the
colour?


Color, you ignorant limey.


So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see?* If you wear a bright red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket.* Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?


It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light. Presumably mainly available in certain colours.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back in
the direction the light source is.

--
Max Demian
Ads
  #2  
Old August 27th 19, 10:51 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Commander Kinsey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?

On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 22:38:57 +0100, Max Demian wrote:

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.


So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?


It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light.


I never realised this - there's more UV at dusk? Or just the same amount, and less visible light? I guess it's to do with diffraction of sunlight at the horizon?

Presumably mainly available in certain colours.


Why are they always yellow or green? Just to do with the chemicals in the dyes that can convert UV into visible?

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back in
the direction the light source is.


I once saw somebody being quite ingenious. He'd broken down and had no available light source from the vehicle (dead electrics presumably, no hazard lights etc). He'd put two hi vis jackets on the back, and every time a car approached, he flashed his torch at them.
  #3  
Old August 28th 19, 05:29 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Rod Speed
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,471
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 22:38:57 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.

So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?


It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light.


I never realised this - there's more UV at dusk?


Yep, because the sunlight is going thru a lot more air
and dust etc in the air and UV gets thru that better
than the longer wavelength light. That’s why sunsets
are red, the red light is reflected off the crap in the air.

Or just the same amount, and less visible light?


Less of the long wavelength red end of the spectrum, anyway.

I guess it's to do with diffraction of sunlight at the horizon?


More the much longer amount of air in the path between
the sun and you.

Presumably mainly available in certain colours.


Why are they always yellow or green?


They arent normally green and plenty are orange/reddish.

Just to do with the chemicals in the dyes that can convert UV into
visible?


To some extent.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back in
the direction the light source is.


I once saw somebody being quite ingenious. He'd broken down
and had no available light source from the vehicle (dead electrics
presumably, no hazard lights etc). He'd put two hi vis jackets on the
back, and every time a car approached, he flashed his torch at them.


Why wasn’t the other car headlights on the hi vis jackets enough ?

  #4  
Old August 28th 19, 06:20 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Bod[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,105
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?

On 27/08/2019 22:38, Max Demian wrote:
On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see?* What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.


So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see?* If you wear a bright
red tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket.* Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?


It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light. Presumably mainly available in certain colours.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back in
the direction the light source is.

On a rainy day it's hard for drivers to see pedestrians and cyclists so
it's a good idea to wear or carry something fluorescent. ... Many people
don't realise it but… fluorescent colours don't show up in the dark or
'glow in the dark'. To be seen by drivers at night you need something
reflective.

https://brightkidz.co.uk/initiatives...high-vis-work/


--
Bod
  #5  
Old August 28th 19, 03:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Commander Kinsey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?

On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 06:20:16 +0100, Bod wrote:

On 27/08/2019 22:38, Max Demian wrote:
On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.

So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright
red tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?


It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light. Presumably mainly available in certain colours.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back in
the direction the light source is.

On a rainy day it's hard for drivers to see pedestrians and cyclists so
it's a good idea to wear or carry something fluorescent. ... Many people
don't realise it but… fluorescent colours don't show up in the dark or
'glow in the dark'. To be seen by drivers at night you need something
reflective.

https://brightkidz.co.uk/initiatives...high-vis-work/


Or just put your lights on?
  #6  
Old August 28th 19, 08:37 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Commander Kinsey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?

On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 05:29:07 +0100, Rod Speed wrote:



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 22:38:57 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.

So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?

It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light.


I never realised this - there's more UV at dusk?


Yep, because the sunlight is going thru a lot more air
and dust etc in the air and UV gets thru that better
than the longer wavelength light. That’s why sunsets
are red, the red light is reflected off the crap in the air.


Isn't it to do with diffraction and refraction?

Or just the same amount, and less visible light?


Less of the long wavelength red end of the spectrum, anyway.


Sunsets are orange.

I guess it's to do with diffraction of sunlight at the horizon?


More the much longer amount of air in the path between
the sun and you.

Presumably mainly available in certain colours.


Why are they always yellow or green?


They arent normally green and plenty are orange/reddish.


Almost every one I see nowadays is yellow. A google image search shows 75% yellow and 25% orange, although I can't remember the last time I saw an orange.

Just to do with the chemicals in the dyes that can convert UV into
visible?


To some extent.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back in
the direction the light source is.


I once saw somebody being quite ingenious. He'd broken down
and had no available light source from the vehicle (dead electrics
presumably, no hazard lights etc). He'd put two hi vis jackets on the
back, and every time a car approached, he flashed his torch at them.


Why wasn’t the other car headlights on the hi vis jackets enough ?


Because they weren't shining directly towards them. It was certainly working, I could seer the jackets 5 or 10 times brighter when he used the torch.
  #7  
Old August 28th 19, 09:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Rod Speed
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,471
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 05:29:07 +0100, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 22:38:57 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.

So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright
red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?

It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light.


I never realised this - there's more UV at dusk?


Yep, because the sunlight is going thru a lot more air
and dust etc in the air and UV gets thru that better
than the longer wavelength light. That’s why sunsets
are red, the red light is reflected off the crap in the air.


Isn't it to do with diffraction and refraction?


Yes but that’s just different words for the same thing.

Or just the same amount, and less visible light?


Less of the long wavelength red end of the spectrum, anyway.


Sunsets are orange.


Nope, red and red is adjacent to orange in the spectrum anyway.

I guess it's to do with diffraction of sunlight at the horizon?


More the much longer amount of air in the path between
the sun and you.

Presumably mainly available in certain colours.


Why are they always yellow or green?


They arent normally green and plenty are orange/reddish.


Almost every one I see nowadays is yellow.


Then you need to get out more.

A google image search shows 75% yellow and 25% orange,


Its nothing like a representative sample of whats seen in the real world.

although I can't remember the last time I saw an orange.


Then you need to get out more. It varys by industry too. some
like the railways have their own colors for various reasons.

Just to do with the chemicals in the dyes that can convert UV into
visible?


To some extent.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back
in
the direction the light source is.


I once saw somebody being quite ingenious. He'd broken down
and had no available light source from the vehicle (dead electrics
presumably, no hazard lights etc). He'd put two hi vis jackets on the
back, and every time a car approached, he flashed his torch at them.


Why wasn’t the other car headlights on the hi vis jackets enough ?


Because they weren't shining directly towards them. It was certainly
working, I could seer the jackets 5 or 10 times brighter when he used the
torch.


  #8  
Old August 28th 19, 09:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Peeler[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Lonely Psychopathic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert!

On Thu, 29 Aug 2019 06:09:53 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH another 96 lines of troll****

--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 85-year-old trolling senile
cretin from Oz:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/r...d-faq.2973853/
  #9  
Old August 28th 19, 10:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Commander Kinsey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?

On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:09:53 +0100, Rod Speed wrote:



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 05:29:07 +0100, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 22:38:57 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.

So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright
red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?

It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in the
dusk) into visible light.

I never realised this - there's more UV at dusk?

Yep, because the sunlight is going thru a lot more air
and dust etc in the air and UV gets thru that better
than the longer wavelength light. That’s why sunsets
are red, the red light is reflected off the crap in the air.


Isn't it to do with diffraction and refraction?


Yes but that’s just different words for the same thing.


No, one is bending round corners, eg long wave radio goes further as it can go over mountains. The other is bending when it goes into another medium, eg shining a torch into water. One bends high frequencies more, the other bends low frequencies more.

Or just the same amount, and less visible light?

Less of the long wavelength red end of the spectrum, anyway.


Sunsets are orange.


Nope, red and red is adjacent to orange in the spectrum anyway.


Near enough. My point was there is more of the long wavelength end of the spectrum at sunset. You were incorrect!

I guess it's to do with diffraction of sunlight at the horizon?

More the much longer amount of air in the path between
the sun and you.

Presumably mainly available in certain colours.

Why are they always yellow or green?

They arent normally green and plenty are orange/reddish.


Almost every one I see nowadays is yellow.


Then you need to get out more.


I have no desire to see more health and softy bull****.

A google image search shows 75% yellow and 25% orange,


Its nothing like a representative sample of whats seen in the real world.


A google search is very representative.

although I can't remember the last time I saw an orange.


Then you need to get out more. It varys by industry too. some
like the railways have their own colors for various reasons.


Ah, I do remember orange at a level crossing.

Just to do with the chemicals in the dyes that can convert UV into
visible?

To some extent.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back
in
the direction the light source is.

I once saw somebody being quite ingenious. He'd broken down
and had no available light source from the vehicle (dead electrics
presumably, no hazard lights etc). He'd put two hi vis jackets on the
back, and every time a car approached, he flashed his torch at them..

Why wasn’t the other car headlights on the hi vis jackets enough ?


Because they weren't shining directly towards them. It was certainly
working, I could seer the jackets 5 or 10 times brighter when he used the
torch.

  #10  
Old August 29th 19, 01:31 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cycling,uk.rec.driving
Rod Speed
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,471
Default Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the colour?



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:09:53 +0100, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 05:29:07 +0100, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 22:38:57 +0100, Max Demian

wrote:

On 27/08/2019 17:25, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 27 Aug 2019 17:13:18 +0100, Colonel Edmund J. Burke
wrote:

On 8/27/2019 9:03 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why is hi-vis clothing easier to see? What’s so special about the
colour?

Color, you ignorant limey.

So why isn't red, yellow, etc as easy to see? If you wear a bright
red
tshirt, you aren't as visible as wearing a hi-vis jacket. Does it
convert all the wavelengths into one or something?

It's fluorescent. It converts ultraviolet (especially prevalent in
the
dusk) into visible light.

I never realised this - there's more UV at dusk?

Yep, because the sunlight is going thru a lot more air
and dust etc in the air and UV gets thru that better
than the longer wavelength light. That’s why sunsets
are red, the red light is reflected off the crap in the air.

Isn't it to do with diffraction and refraction?


Yes but that’s just different words for the same thing.


No,


Yep.

one is bending round corners, eg long wave radio goes further as it can go
over mountains.


That’s not what is involved in there being more UV at sunset.

The other is bending when it goes into another medium, eg shining a torch
into water.


That’s not what is involved in there being more UV at sunset.

One bends high frequencies more, the other bends low frequencies more.


More UV at sunset isnt about bending.

Or just the same amount, and less visible light?

Less of the long wavelength red end of the spectrum, anyway.

Sunsets are orange.


Nope, red and red is adjacent to orange in the spectrum anyway.


Near enough. My point was there is more of the long wavelength end of the
spectrum at sunset.


Not when talking about what ends up at the hi vis vest.

You were incorrect!


Nope, I never am.

I guess it's to do with diffraction of sunlight at the horizon?

More the much longer amount of air in the path between
the sun and you.

Presumably mainly available in certain colours.

Why are they always yellow or green?

They arent normally green and plenty are orange/reddish.


Almost every one I see nowadays is yellow.


Then you need to get out more.


I have no desire to see more health and softy bull****.


It isnt H&S bull****.

A google image search shows 75% yellow and 25% orange,


Its nothing like a representative sample of whats seen in the real world.


A google search is very representative.


Google image results arent.

although I can't remember the last time I saw an orange.


Then you need to get out more. It varys by industry too. some
like the railways have their own colors for various reasons.


Ah, I do remember orange at a level crossing.


Yeah, that’s the most obvious example.

Just to do with the chemicals in the dyes that can convert UV into
visible?

To some extent.

Some, intended to be used at night, have strips that include glass or
plastic beads that reflect light (from torches or car headlamps) back
in
the direction the light source is.

I once saw somebody being quite ingenious. He'd broken down
and had no available light source from the vehicle (dead electrics
presumably, no hazard lights etc). He'd put two hi vis jackets on the
back, and every time a car approached, he flashed his torch at them.

Why wasn’t the other car headlights on the hi vis jackets enough ?

Because they weren't shining directly towards them. It was certainly
working, I could seer the jackets 5 or 10 times brighter when he used
the
torch.


 




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