A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

New B&M 100lux headlight.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old December 10th 17, 04:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:58:49 -0600, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 15:40:16 -0800 (PST), Oculus Lights
wrote:

Yes, your posts sound like promos because they are. That's simple
enough. You have a vested interest in believing in and promoting the
superiority of your product versus all others. That doesn't necessarily
make you inaccurate, just biased.

With only one battery change at a 6.5 hour burn time bright with
beam wide and even enough to win a World 24 Hour Time Trial
Championship on, and 36 hour burn time for climbing and extra
long distance touring, Oculus makes it well worth revisiting and
reconsidering if the reasons given by generator aficionados still
hold water.


The problem is noted by yourself right above. "With one battery change
at 6.5 hour burn time." I don't want to have to carry an extra battery
with me and then change it partway through my ride.

With my generators I always have lights on my bike, so I can be spur of
the moment on my planning. If I am out for a ride, stop and a friend's
house and they invite me to stay for dinner I can do so and ride home in
the dark. But if I left the house with the battery still on the
charger, thinking I was going out just for a day ride, then my options
are sometimes limited.

The piece that you and Steven don't seem to get is that "good enough" is
good enough. Better than "good enough" rapidly becomes multiple
redundancy and enters diminishing returns. I don't need a beam suitable
for going 100 miles an hour because I never will go that fast on my
bike. But I descended on unfamiliar roads with my old halogen setup at
25 mph; I could descend faster with my current LED light and expect that
will be even more true with the incoming eDelux II.

When is enough enough? When one succeeds in recreating daylight? Fiat
Lux!


Damn, probably 50 years ago I rode back and forth to work with a
bottle generator and a headlight with an incandescent light bulb. And,
part of the ride was across small "dikes"perhaps 10 - 12 inches wide
that divided a rice paddy. Slipping off the path there ended up with
the cyclist being knee deep in very smelly sludge.

Amazingly I rode that bike nearly every day for a year or so and never
had a problem.
--
Cheers,

John B.

Ads
  #72  
Old December 10th 17, 12:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sepp Ruf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 220
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

John B. wrote:
On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:41:16 -0600, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:34:13 +0100, Sepp Ruf wrote:
Because you generally want to shield from a flattish \ line of
approaching lights, but not shield your view to the sides, the flatter
brims work better.


We're talking about cycling caps, not baseball caps. A cycling cap
bill's curve would shade the center of the field of view while allowing
peripheral vision.


True. Just use what works best for you, short of Yehuda Moon style. Our
beloved champions aren't strict either, at least after a bad (styrofoam)
hair day:
https://ekz-crosstour.ch/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/RSP_1321-1024x682.jpg

Just like the curved cutoff in the awful OculuStvzo engineering sample
doesn't work...


There's no equivalence between the shape of the brim and the shape of
the cutoff. The cutoff is designed to manage outgoing light, keeping it
where it is useful and not shining it where it is not.


Not functionally equivalent, of course. You did see the video he linked?
There are only two choices with a reversed crescent cutoff: Either aim it
low enough that it does not glare directly opposing traffic, or aim it high
enough to keep the 90 and 270 degree fields of vision for fast curves.

black-tinted rear window; auto-dimming mirrors; manure-spreading trailer.


I have an auto-dimming mirror in my new car. It verges on useless as it
does not dim anywhere near enough. I'd rather have a manual mirror so
that I don't have to reach up and point the damned mirror at the ceiling
so that I'm not blinded by the vehicle behind me.


My wife's small Honda has a manual tab on the bottom of the mirror.
Flick it with your finger and the "guy behind"'s lights are focused on
the ceiling :-)


Still leaves the side mirrors vulnerable. Okay, so the trailer will need to
be wide enough to block the view, but not as wide as to require the mounting
of extra side mirrors on the Honda.
  #73  
Old December 10th 17, 04:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,489
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Saturday, December 9, 2017 at 5:58:56 PM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 15:40:16 -0800 (PST), Oculus Lights
wrote:

Yes, your posts sound like promos because they are. That's simple
enough. You have a vested interest in believing in and promoting the
superiority of your product versus all others. That doesn't necessarily
make you inaccurate, just biased.

With only one battery change at a 6.5 hour burn time bright with
beam wide and even enough to win a World 24 Hour Time Trial
Championship on, and 36 hour burn time for climbing and extra
long distance touring, Oculus makes it well worth revisiting and
reconsidering if the reasons given by generator aficionados still
hold water.


The problem is noted by yourself right above. "With one battery change
at 6.5 hour burn time." I don't want to have to carry an extra battery
with me and then change it partway through my ride.


During the summer 6.5 hours is all night -- and that's at full output. He says 36 hours "climbing" and long distance touring, which is code for "going slowly." The output is probably a few hundred lumens or less. I leave it to those who own the property to judge its quality and value, but those numbers are more than I've ever needed. I do like the convenience of not having to charge, and battery life is always over-stated and diminishes over time anyway, but if you could get those numbers in real life, that's more than 99.9% of people need -- and you can use it on more than one bike.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #74  
Old December 10th 17, 06:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,827
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 10:50:27 +0700, John B wrote:
On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:41:16 -0600, Tim McNamara
wrote:

On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:34:13 +0100, Sepp Ruf
wrote:

black-tinted rear window; auto-dimming mirrors; manure-spreading
trailer.


I have an auto-dimming mirror in my new car. It verges on useless as
it does not dim anywhere near enough. I'd rather have a manual mirror
so that I don't have to reach up and point the damned mirror at the
ceiling so that I'm not blinded by the vehicle behind me.


My wife's small Honda has a manual tab on the bottom of the mirror.
Flick it with your finger and the "guy behind"'s lights are focused on
the ceiling :-)


Yep, like every car I have owned before this one. Self-dimming mirrors
strike me as a solution is search of a problem. Self-dimming side
mirrors are also an option; those might actually be useful since the
glare from those is more problematic to me than the mirror inside the
car.
  #75  
Old December 10th 17, 07:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,827
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 12:30:16 +0100, Sepp Ruf
wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:41:16 -0600, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:34:13 +0100, Sepp Ruf wrote:
Because you generally want to shield from a flattish \ line of
approaching lights, but not shield your view to the sides, the
flatter brims work better.

We're talking about cycling caps, not baseball caps. A cycling cap
bill's curve would shade the center of the field of view while
allowing peripheral vision.


True. Just use what works best for you, short of Yehuda Moon style.


LOL.

Just like the curved cutoff in the awful OculuStvzo engineering
sample doesn't work...

There's no equivalence between the shape of the brim and the shape
of the cutoff. The cutoff is designed to manage outgoing light,
keeping it where it is useful and not shining it where it is not.


Not functionally equivalent, of course. You did see the video he
linked?


I did not, having no interest in or need for his product.

There are only two choices with a reversed crescent cutoff: Either aim
it low enough that it does not glare directly opposing traffic, or aim
it high enough to keep the 90 and 270 degree fields of vision for fast
curves.


Reversed crescent meaning the arc is oriented with the high point on top
or below?

black-tinted rear window; auto-dimming mirrors; manure-spreading
trailer.

I have an auto-dimming mirror in my new car. It verges on useless
as it does not dim anywhere near enough. I'd rather have a manual
mirror so that I don't have to reach up and point the damned mirror
at the ceiling so that I'm not blinded by the vehicle behind me.


My wife's small Honda has a manual tab on the bottom of the mirror.
Flick it with your finger and the "guy behind"'s lights are focused
on the ceiling :-)


Still leaves the side mirrors vulnerable. Okay, so the trailer will
need to be wide enough to block the view, but not as wide as to
require the mounting of extra side mirrors on the Honda.


  #76  
Old December 10th 17, 07:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,827
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 10:58:56 +0700, John B wrote:
On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:58:49 -0600, Tim McNamara
wrote:

The piece that you and Steven don't seem to get is that "good enough"
is good enough. Better than "good enough" rapidly becomes multiple
redundancy and enters diminishing returns. I don't need a beam
suitable for going 100 miles an hour because I never will go that fast
on my bike. But I descended on unfamiliar roads with my old halogen
setup at 25 mph; I could descend faster with my current LED light and
expect that will be even more true with the incoming eDelux II.

When is enough enough? When one succeeds in recreating daylight?
Fiat Lux!


Damn, probably 50 years ago I rode back and forth to work with a
bottle generator and a headlight with an incandescent light bulb. And,
part of the ride was across small "dikes"perhaps 10 - 12 inches wide
that divided a rice paddy. Slipping off the path there ended up with
the cyclist being knee deep in very smelly sludge.

Amazingly I rode that bike nearly every day for a year or so and never
had a problem.


I'd have probably ended up in the rice paddy in broad daylight. ;-)
  #77  
Old December 10th 17, 07:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,827
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 07:01:57 -0800 (PST), jbeattie
wrote:
On Saturday, December 9, 2017 at 5:58:56 PM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:

The problem is noted by yourself right above. "With one battery
change at 6.5 hour burn time." I don't want to have to carry an
extra battery with me and then change it partway through my ride.


During the summer 6.5 hours is all night -- and that's at full output.


Depending on where you live. About true here in June around the
Solstice.

He says 36 hours "climbing" and long distance touring, which is code
for "going slowly." The output is probably a few hundred lumens or
less. I leave it to those who own the property to judge its quality
and value, but those numbers are more than I've ever needed. I do like
the convenience of not having to charge, and battery life is always
over-stated and diminishes over time anyway, but if you could get
those numbers in real life, that's more than 99.9% of people need --
and you can use it on more than one bike.


Being able to use the same light on different bikes is a legitimate
advantage. I have three bikes with generators, two of which (SON
hub/eDelux and Velological/eDelux II) were not insignificant investments
(the Sanyo BB generator on my commuter was free and the halogen lamp was
fairly inexpensive). Even a pretty expensive flashlight and multiple
mounts would cost less.

Ultimately the purchaser has to decide on cost/benefit. I don't want to
have to think about lights and just want them there reliably. I don't
care about the small amount of extra weight and have never been a gram
counter (at 6'3" and 230 lbs, gram counting is nonsense). The drag of
each of these systems is very low to the point of being almost
unnoticeable. To me the benefits of generator lights outweigh the
costs. The costs of flashlights outweigh the benefits for me. I don't
need searingly bright lights and the hassles of having to remember to
keep the batteries charged, carry a spare battery in some situatons,
switch the light from bike to bike, etc., are unappealing. For other
folks the math is different.
  #78  
Old December 10th 17, 08:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sepp Ruf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 220
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 12:30:16 +0100, Sepp Ruf wrote:


Not functionally equivalent, of course. You did see the video he
linked?


I did not, having no interest in or need for his product.


Assuming he actually believes what he's saying, oh well ... I can't remember
if I signed an NDA

There are only two choices with a reversed crescent cutoff: Either aim
it low enough that it does not glare directly opposing traffic, or aim
it high enough to keep the 90 and 270 degree fields of vision for fast
curves.


Reversed crescent meaning the arc is oriented with the high point on top
or below?


single high point on top.
  #79  
Old December 10th 17, 10:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,827
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 20:35:37 +0100, Sepp Ruf
wrote:
Tim McNamara wrote:

There are only two choices with a reversed crescent cutoff: Either
aim it low enough that it does not glare directly opposing traffic,
or aim it high enough to keep the 90 and 270 degree fields of vision
for fast curves.


Reversed crescent meaning the arc is oriented with the high point on
top or below?


single high point on top.


Ah. Well, that's the easiest way to do it given a round lens and
concave reflector. Having the ends of the crescent be higher, or the
top of the beam be flat, would do a better job of illuminating the
terrain into which one is turning without blinding those coming towards
you. That takes some computer analysis and optical manufacturing nous
to be able to do. I don't know if Oculus manufactures their own stuff
or assembles off-the-shelf components into their product. The latter is
quite common but not universal.
  #80  
Old December 11th 17, 02:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 12:30:16 +0100, Sepp Ruf
wrote:

John B. wrote:
On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:41:16 -0600, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:34:13 +0100, Sepp Ruf wrote:
Because you generally want to shield from a flattish \ line of
approaching lights, but not shield your view to the sides, the flatter
brims work better.

We're talking about cycling caps, not baseball caps. A cycling cap
bill's curve would shade the center of the field of view while allowing
peripheral vision.


True. Just use what works best for you, short of Yehuda Moon style. Our
beloved champions aren't strict either, at least after a bad (styrofoam)
hair day:
https://ekz-crosstour.ch/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/RSP_1321-1024x682.jpg

Just like the curved cutoff in the awful OculuStvzo engineering sample
doesn't work...

There's no equivalence between the shape of the brim and the shape of
the cutoff. The cutoff is designed to manage outgoing light, keeping it
where it is useful and not shining it where it is not.


Not functionally equivalent, of course. You did see the video he linked?
There are only two choices with a reversed crescent cutoff: Either aim it
low enough that it does not glare directly opposing traffic, or aim it high
enough to keep the 90 and 270 degree fields of vision for fast curves.

black-tinted rear window; auto-dimming mirrors; manure-spreading trailer.

I have an auto-dimming mirror in my new car. It verges on useless as it
does not dim anywhere near enough. I'd rather have a manual mirror so
that I don't have to reach up and point the damned mirror at the ceiling
so that I'm not blinded by the vehicle behind me.


My wife's small Honda has a manual tab on the bottom of the mirror.
Flick it with your finger and the "guy behind"'s lights are focused on
the ceiling :-)


Still leaves the side mirrors vulnerable. Okay, so the trailer will need to
be wide enough to block the view, but not as wide as to require the mounting
of extra side mirrors on the Honda.


I'm not sure about side mirrors. I have them on my pickup and my
wife's little Honda has them But I don't remember ever having a
problem with them.

--
Cheers,

John B.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The last headlight you will ever need somebody[_2_] Techniques 115 April 28th 14 02:12 AM
Headlight Tom $herman (-_-) Techniques 16 August 17th 12 03:43 AM
FS: L&M ARC HID headlight Zach Marketplace 0 February 13th 08 08:25 PM
LED Headlight HughMann Australia 12 August 30th 06 11:51 AM
Headlight Bruni Techniques 8 August 31st 03 06:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.