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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #661  
Old July 9th 17, 09:32 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,157
Default AG: Cleaning agent

On Sat, 08 Jul 2017 23:11:34 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


At one time, some brands of lip salve came in tiny round screw-top
boxes. This was handy in a New York winter; a Chapstick in my pocket
often got too hard to apply, but lip salve meant to be put on with a
fingertip could be rubbed until it thawed.

After my bottle of olive oil leaked all over my tool kit, I began to
carry a lip-salve box filled with Eucerin (original formula: almost
thick enough to slice) for cleaning my hands after fixing a flat.

I've stopped carrying a spare tube, but I still carry the sole
remaining lip-salve box; now it's filled with A&D ointment, and I
carry it in my pocket. A&D is better at cleaning and also heals
shallow injuries. And if it's in my pocket, I can use it to clean off
the chainwheel print when I change into walking shoes.

I ran through a lot of Subway napkins on Wednesday (5 July) -- I
unshipped my chain, among other things, but the chain dirt came off
with just the napkin.

I carry "baby wipes" in my tool pouch. Initially I tried carrying them
in zip lock bags and they all dried out. More recently I bought a
plastic bag welder, I guess it might be called. Place the mouth of a
plastic bag on the "jaws" of the thing and press the top jaw down and
the bag is "welded" close.
http://tinyurl.com/yaysk2mc

It works a treat except that the bags are pretty stout and hard to
tear open so now I also carry a small pocket knife in the tool bag.

--
Cheers,

John B.

Ads
  #662  
Old July 9th 17, 09:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
John Dunlop[_2_]
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Posts: 4
Default AG: Cleaning agent

Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so
over whether to say "unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The
incident was unshipping, but it was shipping that got my fingers
dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable
dozens of times.

On an international forum, I suspect that my best bet would be to
get wordy and say "I had to put my chain back on the chainwheel".


"Unshipped" would be understood in BrE too, but I'd be more likely to
simply say "my chain came off".

The more unlikely term is "chainwheel". I'd say that's pretty rare in
BrE, foreign-sounding even. It's usually "chainring" for the cogs at the
front, and for those at the rear, "sprocket" for individual ones and
"cassette" for the whole assemblage, or more colloquially "block".

--
John
  #663  
Old July 9th 17, 10:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
Richard Heathfield
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Posts: 1
Default AG: Cleaning agent

On 09/07/17 09:46, John Dunlop wrote:
Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so
over whether to say "unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The
incident was unshipping, but it was shipping that got my fingers dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable
dozens of times.


I agree that they take up almost no space.

But when it's hammering down with rain and the traffic thunders past you
at 60 mph and your chain has wrapped itself around the spokes of your
rear wheel and you were already running late, one does not have to
venture too far into the realms of fantasy to hypothesise that the
integrity of your latex gloves might just be the last thing on your mind.

--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
  #664  
Old July 9th 17, 12:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
Whiskers[_2_]
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Posts: 2
Default AG: Cleaning agent

On 2017-07-09, Richard Heathfield wrote:
On 09/07/17 09:46, John Dunlop wrote:
Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so
over whether to say "unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The
incident was unshipping, but it was shipping that got my fingers
dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable
dozens of times.


I agree that they take up almost no space.

But when it's hammering down with rain and the traffic thunders past
you at 60 mph and your chain has wrapped itself around the spokes of
your rear wheel and you were already running late, one does not have
to venture too far into the realms of fantasy to hypothesise that the
integrity of your latex gloves might just be the last thing on your
mind.


That sort of thing is why I prefer hub gears ...

My British English would probably say 'the chain came off' and 'I put it
back' or 're-threaded' or 'remounted'.

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
  #665  
Old July 9th 17, 12:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
John Dunlop[_2_]
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Posts: 4
Default AG: Cleaning agent

Richard Heathfield:

But when it's hammering down with rain and the traffic thunders past
you at 60 mph and your chain has wrapped itself around the spokes of
your rear wheel and you were already running late, one does not have
to venture too far into the realms of fantasy to hypothesise that
the integrity of your latex gloves might just be the last thing on
your mind.


Of course a real man would eschew the gloves altogether and wash his
hands in a puddle.

--
John
  #666  
Old July 9th 17, 03:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
Paul Carmichael[_2_]
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Posts: 2
Default AG: Cleaning agent

El 09/07/17 a las 10:46, John Dunlop escribió:
Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so over whether to say
"unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The incident was unshipping, but it was shipping
that got my fingers dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable dozens of times.

On an international forum, I suspect that my best bet would be to
get wordy and say "I had to put my chain back on the chainwheel".


"Unshipped" would be understood in BrE too, but I'd be more likely to simply say "my chain
came off".

The more unlikely term is "chainwheel". I'd say that's pretty rare in
BrE, foreign-sounding even. It's usually "chainring" for the cogs at the front


Front sprocket to me. Maybe from owning motorcycles.


--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
  #667  
Old July 9th 17, 09:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default AG: Cleaning agent

I think you want nitrile rather than latex gloves; they will resist oil and grease. I have a pair in a Zip-Lok baggie in my pack. I wash them with hand soap and they stay reasonably clean.
--
Andrew Chaplin
  #668  
Old July 9th 17, 11:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
Duane[_4_]
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Posts: 1,281
Default AG: Cleaning agent

Paul Carmichael wrote:
El 09/07/17 a las 10:46, John Dunlop escribió:
Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so over whether to say
"unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The incident was unshipping, but it was shipping
that got my fingers dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable dozens of times.

On an international forum, I suspect that my best bet would be to
get wordy and say "I had to put my chain back on the chainwheel".


"Unshipped" would be understood in BrE too, but I'd be more likely to
simply say "my chain
came off".

The more unlikely term is "chainwheel". I'd say that's pretty rare in
BrE, foreign-sounding even. It's usually "chainring" for the cogs at the front


Front sprocket to me. Maybe from owning motorcycles.



Never heard it referred to as anything but a chain ring. Maybe it's a
local thing.

--
duane
  #669  
Old July 10th 17, 02:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,157
Default AG: Cleaning agent

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 16:58:15 +0200, Paul Carmichael
wrote:

El 09/07/17 a las 10:46, John Dunlop escribió:
Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so over whether to say
"unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The incident was unshipping, but it was shipping
that got my fingers dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable dozens of times.

On an international forum, I suspect that my best bet would be to
get wordy and say "I had to put my chain back on the chainwheel".


"Unshipped" would be understood in BrE too, but I'd be more likely to simply say "my chain
came off".

The more unlikely term is "chainwheel". I'd say that's pretty rare in
BrE, foreign-sounding even. It's usually "chainring" for the cogs at the front


Front sprocket to me. Maybe from owning motorcycles.


:-) Motorcycles have sprockets but bicycles have chain rings and cogs :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #670  
Old July 10th 17, 01:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,alt.usage.english
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default AG: Cleaning agent

On Sun, 9 Jul 2017 09:46:22 +0100, John Dunlop
wrote:

Joy Beeson:

I'm tempted to cross-post this to alt.usage.english -- I dithered so
over whether to say "unshipped" "shipped" or "re-shipped". The
incident was unshipping, but it was shipping that got my fingers
dirty.


You could carry a pair of latex gloves for those on-the-road repairs.
They take up almost no space, and if you're careful they're reusable
dozens of times.

On an international forum, I suspect that my best bet would be to
get wordy and say "I had to put my chain back on the chainwheel".


"Unshipped" would be understood in BrE too, but I'd be more likely to
simply say "my chain came off".

The more unlikely term is "chainwheel". I'd say that's pretty rare in
BrE, foreign-sounding even. It's usually "chainring" for the cogs at the
front, and for those at the rear, "sprocket" for individual ones and
"cassette" for the whole assemblage, or more colloquially "block".


"chainwheel" is used by the British company Brompton Bicycle Ltd.

It is used to refer to the whole "wheel" to which the pedals are
attached. The "chainring" is the replaceable outer part of the assembly.

For instance:
http://brilliantbikes.co.uk/brompton...hainwheel.html

44T Brompton BLACK edition crank set (left and right complete) - the
Brompton "spider" crankset
....
This is the BLACK edition crankset - with black chainwheel and
cranks
....
The "spider" crankset has a few advantages over the older fixed
crankset:
The chainring protector is held on with screws rather than plastic
lugs so is less liable to falling off
The chainring can be changed without the need to replace the crank
as well (making it easier to change gear ratio)

From these search results:
http://brilliantbikes.co.uk/search?c..._search=Search

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
 




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