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Bicycling & health benefits of?



 
 
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  #101  
Old October 22nd 17, 11:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,829
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Sunday, October 22, 2017 at 4:53:56 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/21/2017 4:48 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 3:41:52 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/20/2017 9:30 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 3:02:37 AM UTC+1, Doug Landau wrote:
I don't remember Dr White, but I remember Jim Fixx, the prophet of jogging. I went off him when I discovered that his idea of a gourmet meal was a hamburger. He died at 52 while out jogging. Not exactly a recommendation.


What age did his dad reach?

Sorry, I thought it was well known. His dad also died of a heart attack. Right around the same age IIRC.

That proves that genetics are better forecasters than tree rings and tea leaves.

But now I'm wondering if his jogging didn't aggravate his genetic predisposition.

Andre Jute
The genes will get you


We can't know but only half his genome is paternal. Then
there are epigenic effects plus diet, environment, behavior
and biota.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


It's a long time since I studied classical Greek, but if "epigenic" (which my spellchecker wants to correct to "epigenetic") means effects superior to ("over") the genome, surely the very word is a contradiction in terms. I thought DNA was the master roll so to speak, none higher, none superior, none able to countermand the fate it decrees.

Andre Jute
Cursed with curiosity in a wikipedia age


Yes, epigenetic thanks.

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/conte...netics/memory/

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I get it. Epigenetic used for "differentiated", to mean singularly or uniquely purposeful. Thanks.

Andre Jute
Epigenetic`: Another example of science getting into smaller and smaller parts of whatever.
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  #102  
Old October 23rd 17, 03:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 3,345
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 10:55:13 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 21 Oct 2017 13:02:45 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 7:19:19 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-10-20 18:04, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2017 11:44:37 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-10-20 08:31,
wrote:
On Friday, October 20, 2017 at 12:23:57 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 12:06:57 -0400, "(PeteCresswell)"
wrote:

Per John B.:

As I told Joerg, just wash your feet :-)

I don't buy it when it comes to carpets.

Bare floors, maybe... but feet will still be damp after "Washing"
and that will affect the carpet over time.

Quotes because I strongly suspect "Washing" = "Quick rinse with
clear room-temperature water".

Well, if you have polished mahogany floors, or terrazzo, floors in
your abode and you wash your feet before you enter you won't have
problems with your carpet.

Carpets also add to the servants work load with all that vacuuming
and frequent visits by the carpet cleaning company. They will
applaud you when you get rid of them.

I have come to the conclusion that hardwood floors with area rugs are
much better than wall to wall carpets. These wall to wall crap
accumulators are nothing but trouble and for no added comfort.


That perception will change when our bodies start giving out and we need
canes or walkers. Or when Fido and Fluffy duke it out and the area rugs
go sailing for the impteenth time.

Well, I'm 85 (this month) and my wife is 72 and so far we haven't had
any problems... terrazzo floors on the ground floor and polished
mahogany on the second.

No canes or walkers yet...


There is the difference. You guys are still quite healthy and in your
case probably in part due to cycling. We visit nursing homes a lot as
volunteers but it's the same at church and other places. Falls of frail
people mostly take places where there is no carpet. Outside on the
concrete, inside on tile, on marble and on linoleum. Because all that
stuff provides low friction and thus almost no grip once a situation
gets just a tad out of balance.

When you take a look at an indoor walker they are usually the kinds
without brake levers. Two wheels and small gliders in back. Most people
stick tennis balls over the back posts to improve friction but those do
not provided any meaningful friction on slick surfaces. Area rugs are
the worst floor covering for those folks. One slight tangle into the
edge of a rug and there might be a nasty fall.


I'll have to think about that. I have virtually no balance. Especially when the medication kicks in.


Medicine aside you can improve your balance by doing exercises. Try
standing on one leg and swing the other back and forth. Then switch
legs.

Initially you probably can't do that for a minute without staggering
but after a few weeks you will find that you are nearly as stable on
one leg as you are on two.



But under normal circumstances I am losing my balance in the house all the time. I have wall-to-wall carpeting because the damn things are always dirty and in need of commercial cleaning. I solved this before by putting area rugs over the top of them but after my ex-wife decided she was better off with than without me she also decided that she was running everything. Which was (confidentially) what caused everything in the first place. Because running everything means doing nothing.

I have the cabinets in the kitchens and the heavy bed frame in the bedroom and know exactly where they are at all times and can catch myself from falling by hooking a foot under these overhangs. I can't feel my feet but I can feel when I stop tipping over.


I'll give that a try but I don't have much balance because of the medication destroying my ability to distinguish from up and down as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling. For a while I couldn't even walk bare footed on a hard surface.
  #104  
Old October 23rd 17, 10:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Monday, October 23, 2017 at 10:40:51 AM UTC-7, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per :
as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling.


What do you do about keeping your feet on the pedals?

I've been using cage pedals without cleats - not being able to afford
the dues on learning clipless - but lately out-of-the-saddle has been
problematic because somehow sometimes a foot flips the wrong way on the
pedal.


Pete, I use Look pedals. The old Delta cleat ones since there are a lot of really cheap pedal sets on the market. But you have to concentrate on learning to insert and click-out of the pedals in difficult conditions such as on hills etc.

The Shimano off-road SpD's are far more easy to get into but you have the same trouble of clicking out in an emergency. And SpD shoes are usually easier to find cheaply - you can get a tennis shoe type with laces that is easier on the feet than most road shoes.

But the proper fitting shoes and pedals and the ability to clip-out rapidly make riding far easier. I pedal circles that way which gives you perhaps another 20% power with no more energy outlay once you build your quads.

But don't use ANY clipless pedal unless you have your problem diagnosed to make certain that it isn't physical.

I have been having arm pain lately. It turns out that I tore my ACL ligament three months ago. The tear isn't bad but because of the way I lay on it sleeping the pain became pretty unbearable at times. Why the hell did it not show up for a month? Physical therapy should work the doc says.

Funny that it doesn't have any pain when I'm riding because of the position of my hands. And often the pain is less after a ride.
  #105  
Old October 24th 17, 01:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:25:56 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 10:55:13 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 21 Oct 2017 13:02:45 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 7:19:19 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-10-20 18:04, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2017 11:44:37 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-10-20 08:31,
wrote:
On Friday, October 20, 2017 at 12:23:57 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 12:06:57 -0400, "(PeteCresswell)"
wrote:

Per John B.:

As I told Joerg, just wash your feet :-)

I don't buy it when it comes to carpets.

Bare floors, maybe... but feet will still be damp after "Washing"
and that will affect the carpet over time.

Quotes because I strongly suspect "Washing" = "Quick rinse with
clear room-temperature water".

Well, if you have polished mahogany floors, or terrazzo, floors in
your abode and you wash your feet before you enter you won't have
problems with your carpet.

Carpets also add to the servants work load with all that vacuuming
and frequent visits by the carpet cleaning company. They will
applaud you when you get rid of them.

I have come to the conclusion that hardwood floors with area rugs are
much better than wall to wall carpets. These wall to wall crap
accumulators are nothing but trouble and for no added comfort.


That perception will change when our bodies start giving out and we need
canes or walkers. Or when Fido and Fluffy duke it out and the area rugs
go sailing for the impteenth time.

Well, I'm 85 (this month) and my wife is 72 and so far we haven't had
any problems... terrazzo floors on the ground floor and polished
mahogany on the second.

No canes or walkers yet...


There is the difference. You guys are still quite healthy and in your
case probably in part due to cycling. We visit nursing homes a lot as
volunteers but it's the same at church and other places. Falls of frail
people mostly take places where there is no carpet. Outside on the
concrete, inside on tile, on marble and on linoleum. Because all that
stuff provides low friction and thus almost no grip once a situation
gets just a tad out of balance.

When you take a look at an indoor walker they are usually the kinds
without brake levers. Two wheels and small gliders in back. Most people
stick tennis balls over the back posts to improve friction but those do
not provided any meaningful friction on slick surfaces. Area rugs are
the worst floor covering for those folks. One slight tangle into the
edge of a rug and there might be a nasty fall.

I'll have to think about that. I have virtually no balance. Especially when the medication kicks in.


Medicine aside you can improve your balance by doing exercises. Try
standing on one leg and swing the other back and forth. Then switch
legs.

Initially you probably can't do that for a minute without staggering
but after a few weeks you will find that you are nearly as stable on
one leg as you are on two.



But under normal circumstances I am losing my balance in the house all the time. I have wall-to-wall carpeting because the damn things are always dirty and in need of commercial cleaning. I solved this before by putting area rugs over the top of them but after my ex-wife decided she was better off with than without me she also decided that she was running everything. Which was (confidentially) what caused everything in the first place. Because running everything means doing nothing.

I have the cabinets in the kitchens and the heavy bed frame in the bedroom and know exactly where they are at all times and can catch myself from falling by hooking a foot under these overhangs. I can't feel my feet but I can feel when I stop tipping over.


I'll give that a try but I don't have much balance because of the medication destroying my ability to distinguish from up and down as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling. For a while I couldn't even walk bare footed on a hard surface.


If it is the medicine that causes the loss of balance then obviously
exercises aren't going to help, but if it is the results today of
having previously taken the medicine then it might.

In any event it is cheap enough to try, whether it works or not.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #106  
Old October 24th 17, 01:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:43:40 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Monday, October 23, 2017 at 10:40:51 AM UTC-7, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per
:
as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling.


What do you do about keeping your feet on the pedals?

I've been using cage pedals without cleats - not being able to afford
the dues on learning clipless - but lately out-of-the-saddle has been
problematic because somehow sometimes a foot flips the wrong way on the
pedal.


Pete, I use Look pedals. The old Delta cleat ones since there are a lot of really cheap pedal sets on the market. But you have to concentrate on learning to insert and click-out of the pedals in difficult conditions such as on hills etc.

The Shimano off-road SpD's are far more easy to get into but you have the same trouble of clicking out in an emergency. And SpD shoes are usually easier to find cheaply - you can get a tennis shoe type with laces that is easier on the feet than most road shoes.

But the proper fitting shoes and pedals and the ability to clip-out rapidly make riding far easier. I pedal circles that way which gives you perhaps another 20% power with no more energy outlay once you build your quads.

But don't use ANY clipless pedal unless you have your problem diagnosed to make certain that it isn't physical.

I have been having arm pain lately. It turns out that I tore my ACL ligament three months ago. The tear isn't bad but because of the way I lay on it sleeping the pain became pretty unbearable at times. Why the hell did it not show up for a month? Physical therapy should work the doc says.

Funny that it doesn't have any pain when I'm riding because of the position of my hands. And often the pain is less after a ride.


Re clip less pedals, somewhere recently I read an article written by a
guy that apparently went around peering at some of the TdeF riders
bikes. He reported that he noted that all of the bikes he looked at
had the tension of the pedal locks set to the minimum, or nearly the
minimum tension.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #107  
Old October 24th 17, 03:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 5:06:37 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:25:56 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 10:55:13 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 21 Oct 2017 13:02:45 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 7:19:19 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-10-20 18:04, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2017 11:44:37 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-10-20 08:31,
wrote:
On Friday, October 20, 2017 at 12:23:57 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 12:06:57 -0400, "(PeteCresswell)"
wrote:

Per John B.:

As I told Joerg, just wash your feet :-)

I don't buy it when it comes to carpets.

Bare floors, maybe... but feet will still be damp after "Washing"
and that will affect the carpet over time.

Quotes because I strongly suspect "Washing" = "Quick rinse with
clear room-temperature water".

Well, if you have polished mahogany floors, or terrazzo, floors in
your abode and you wash your feet before you enter you won't have
problems with your carpet.

Carpets also add to the servants work load with all that vacuuming
and frequent visits by the carpet cleaning company. They will
applaud you when you get rid of them.

I have come to the conclusion that hardwood floors with area rugs are
much better than wall to wall carpets. These wall to wall crap
accumulators are nothing but trouble and for no added comfort.


That perception will change when our bodies start giving out and we need
canes or walkers. Or when Fido and Fluffy duke it out and the area rugs
go sailing for the impteenth time.

Well, I'm 85 (this month) and my wife is 72 and so far we haven't had
any problems... terrazzo floors on the ground floor and polished
mahogany on the second.

No canes or walkers yet...


There is the difference. You guys are still quite healthy and in your
case probably in part due to cycling. We visit nursing homes a lot as
volunteers but it's the same at church and other places. Falls of frail
people mostly take places where there is no carpet. Outside on the
concrete, inside on tile, on marble and on linoleum. Because all that
stuff provides low friction and thus almost no grip once a situation
gets just a tad out of balance.

When you take a look at an indoor walker they are usually the kinds
without brake levers. Two wheels and small gliders in back. Most people
stick tennis balls over the back posts to improve friction but those do
not provided any meaningful friction on slick surfaces. Area rugs are
the worst floor covering for those folks. One slight tangle into the
edge of a rug and there might be a nasty fall.

I'll have to think about that. I have virtually no balance. Especially when the medication kicks in.


Medicine aside you can improve your balance by doing exercises. Try
standing on one leg and swing the other back and forth. Then switch
legs.

Initially you probably can't do that for a minute without staggering
but after a few weeks you will find that you are nearly as stable on
one leg as you are on two.



But under normal circumstances I am losing my balance in the house all the time. I have wall-to-wall carpeting because the damn things are always dirty and in need of commercial cleaning. I solved this before by putting area rugs over the top of them but after my ex-wife decided she was better off with than without me she also decided that she was running everything. Which was (confidentially) what caused everything in the first place. Because running everything means doing nothing.

I have the cabinets in the kitchens and the heavy bed frame in the bedroom and know exactly where they are at all times and can catch myself from falling by hooking a foot under these overhangs. I can't feel my feet but I can feel when I stop tipping over.


I'll give that a try but I don't have much balance because of the medication destroying my ability to distinguish from up and down as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling. For a while I couldn't even walk bare footed on a hard surface.


If it is the medicine that causes the loss of balance then obviously
exercises aren't going to help, but if it is the results today of
having previously taken the medicine then it might.

In any event it is cheap enough to try, whether it works or not.


I have to take the medications in VERY large doses every day twice a day. These doses are so large that most doctors get very concerned but my neurologist tells me that they are safe and here I am with the only problem being I was just diagnosed with a torn ACL when he tried to increase the dosage because of some events that he interpreted as the possible start of a seizure.

As it turned out the increased dose made my entire balance system go out of whack and I could not balance on a bicycle at very low (near stop) speeds and fell against things trying to go very slow on bicycle paths or turning up onto sidewalks. Plus the "episodes" increased seven fold. So I returned to the previous level. But the last straw fall was against a chain link fence which apparently tore my ACL. The surgeon says that it doesn't look bad enough for surgery and that physical therapy should remove the pain.

I'm telling you that these Chinese medical specialists all appear to be so much better than the people that they are replacing that I am astounded. He only had to glance at the MRI to tell what was wrong.

Of course the day before I had done a hard ride which is sort of therapy and I didn't have much pain.

He is now afraid to ride because he rode to the top of Mt. Diablo with a friend and on the way down the friend got his front wheel stuck in a crack, was thrown off and broke his neck and is now a quadraplegic.

I think that those of us that were naturally clumsy as children learned how to fall at an early age and have a lower tendency to land on our heads. The only reason I did was because I was bent way down to look at the speedo pick-up. There was insufficient time to react.

Coming down the north side of Mt. Diablo I too got my front wheel caught in a crack but simply rode it out. That comes from falling every chance I get..
  #108  
Old October 24th 17, 03:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 5:10:15 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:43:40 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Monday, October 23, 2017 at 10:40:51 AM UTC-7, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per
:
as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling..

What do you do about keeping your feet on the pedals?

I've been using cage pedals without cleats - not being able to afford
the dues on learning clipless - but lately out-of-the-saddle has been
problematic because somehow sometimes a foot flips the wrong way on the
pedal.


Pete, I use Look pedals. The old Delta cleat ones since there are a lot of really cheap pedal sets on the market. But you have to concentrate on learning to insert and click-out of the pedals in difficult conditions such as on hills etc.

The Shimano off-road SpD's are far more easy to get into but you have the same trouble of clicking out in an emergency. And SpD shoes are usually easier to find cheaply - you can get a tennis shoe type with laces that is easier on the feet than most road shoes.

But the proper fitting shoes and pedals and the ability to clip-out rapidly make riding far easier. I pedal circles that way which gives you perhaps another 20% power with no more energy outlay once you build your quads.

But don't use ANY clipless pedal unless you have your problem diagnosed to make certain that it isn't physical.

I have been having arm pain lately. It turns out that I tore my ACL ligament three months ago. The tear isn't bad but because of the way I lay on it sleeping the pain became pretty unbearable at times. Why the hell did it not show up for a month? Physical therapy should work the doc says.

Funny that it doesn't have any pain when I'm riding because of the position of my hands. And often the pain is less after a ride.


Re clip less pedals, somewhere recently I read an article written by a
guy that apparently went around peering at some of the TdeF riders
bikes. He reported that he noted that all of the bikes he looked at
had the tension of the pedal locks set to the minimum, or nearly the
minimum tension.


There are many models of Look pedals that don't even have tension adjustments and the tension feels to me like minimum. The set on the Pinarello are 206's I think but the best I used were the CX-6.
  #109  
Old October 25th 17, 02:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Bicycling & health benefits of?

On Tue, 24 Oct 2017 07:02:08 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 5:06:37 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:25:56 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 10:55:13 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 21 Oct 2017 13:02:45 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 7:19:19 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-10-20 18:04, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2017 11:44:37 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-10-20 08:31,
wrote:
On Friday, October 20, 2017 at 12:23:57 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 12:06:57 -0400, "(PeteCresswell)"
wrote:

Per John B.:

As I told Joerg, just wash your feet :-)

I don't buy it when it comes to carpets.

Bare floors, maybe... but feet will still be damp after "Washing"
and that will affect the carpet over time.

Quotes because I strongly suspect "Washing" = "Quick rinse with
clear room-temperature water".

Well, if you have polished mahogany floors, or terrazzo, floors in
your abode and you wash your feet before you enter you won't have
problems with your carpet.

Carpets also add to the servants work load with all that vacuuming
and frequent visits by the carpet cleaning company. They will
applaud you when you get rid of them.

I have come to the conclusion that hardwood floors with area rugs are
much better than wall to wall carpets. These wall to wall crap
accumulators are nothing but trouble and for no added comfort.


That perception will change when our bodies start giving out and we need
canes or walkers. Or when Fido and Fluffy duke it out and the area rugs
go sailing for the impteenth time.

Well, I'm 85 (this month) and my wife is 72 and so far we haven't had
any problems... terrazzo floors on the ground floor and polished
mahogany on the second.

No canes or walkers yet...


There is the difference. You guys are still quite healthy and in your
case probably in part due to cycling. We visit nursing homes a lot as
volunteers but it's the same at church and other places. Falls of frail
people mostly take places where there is no carpet. Outside on the
concrete, inside on tile, on marble and on linoleum. Because all that
stuff provides low friction and thus almost no grip once a situation
gets just a tad out of balance.

When you take a look at an indoor walker they are usually the kinds
without brake levers. Two wheels and small gliders in back. Most people
stick tennis balls over the back posts to improve friction but those do
not provided any meaningful friction on slick surfaces. Area rugs are
the worst floor covering for those folks. One slight tangle into the
edge of a rug and there might be a nasty fall.

I'll have to think about that. I have virtually no balance. Especially when the medication kicks in.


Medicine aside you can improve your balance by doing exercises. Try
standing on one leg and swing the other back and forth. Then switch
legs.

Initially you probably can't do that for a minute without staggering
but after a few weeks you will find that you are nearly as stable on
one leg as you are on two.



But under normal circumstances I am losing my balance in the house all the time. I have wall-to-wall carpeting because the damn things are always dirty and in need of commercial cleaning. I solved this before by putting area rugs over the top of them but after my ex-wife decided she was better off with than without me she also decided that she was running everything. Which was (confidentially) what caused everything in the first place. Because running everything means doing nothing.

I have the cabinets in the kitchens and the heavy bed frame in the bedroom and know exactly where they are at all times and can catch myself from falling by hooking a foot under these overhangs. I can't feel my feet but I can feel when I stop tipping over.

I'll give that a try but I don't have much balance because of the medication destroying my ability to distinguish from up and down as well as making the entire forward half of my feet without feeling. For a while I couldn't even walk bare footed on a hard surface.


If it is the medicine that causes the loss of balance then obviously
exercises aren't going to help, but if it is the results today of
having previously taken the medicine then it might.

In any event it is cheap enough to try, whether it works or not.


I have to take the medications in VERY large doses every day twice a day. These doses are so large that most doctors get very concerned but my neurologist tells me that they are safe and here I am with the only problem being I was just diagnosed with a torn ACL when he tried to increase the dosage because of some events that he interpreted as the possible start of a seizure.

As it turned out the increased dose made my entire balance system go out of whack and I could not balance on a bicycle at very low (near stop) speeds and fell against things trying to go very slow on bicycle paths or turning up onto sidewalks. Plus the "episodes" increased seven fold. So I returned to the previous level. But the last straw fall was against a chain link fence which apparently tore my ACL. The surgeon says that it doesn't look bad enough for surgery and that physical therapy should remove the pain.


One of the problems with many modern medicines is that they may have
strange side effects. I was recently prescribed an anti dizziness
medication - I had an severe ear infection and perforated ear drum -
which had an effect on my pulse rate, which is already low.

As I have gotten a new passport I had to go to the Thai Immigrations
to get my visa transferred to my new passport and because of the
funeral arrangements for the previous king the government offices,
Immigration, are only open for two days this week. We got there two
hours before the Immigration Office opened and there were 100 people
waiting in line :-(

Anyway after standing erect for two hours I almost fainted and had to
sit down on the floor for a while. Sort of scary until I remembered
the guys that used to pass out standing in rank during parades in the
Air Force.

I've stopped taking the medicine and my pulse rate is back to my usual
"low normal" range... and no dizziness.

I'm telling you that these Chinese medical specialists all appear to be so much better than the people that they are replacing that I am astounded. He only had to glance at the MRI to tell what was wrong.

Of course the day before I had done a hard ride which is sort of therapy and I didn't have much pain.

He is now afraid to ride because he rode to the top of Mt. Diablo with a friend and on the way down the friend got his front wheel stuck in a crack, was thrown off and broke his neck and is now a quadraplegic.

I think that those of us that were naturally clumsy as children learned how to fall at an early age and have a lower tendency to land on our heads. The only reason I did was because I was bent way down to look at the speedo pick-up. There was insufficient time to react.

Coming down the north side of Mt. Diablo I too got my front wheel caught in a crack but simply rode it out. That comes from falling every chance I get.

--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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