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Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 11th 17, 11:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 7,941
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf

This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S. has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the highest death rate.
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  #2  
Old August 11th 17, 11:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 4,292
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf


This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S. has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the highest death rate.



No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those countries,
Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the numbers on slide 6 are
what they are.

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands (Vaals) to
Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed bike on the bike path,
put it in 12th gear and hammer those 20 miles. I did the same distance
here (Cameron Park to Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing
in with fast traffic at times which some potentially interested cyclists
don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt field for half a mile,
including crossing a muddy creek and lifting the bike over some low
fences. Hardly anyone would be willing to do the latter. On the way back
it was mostly along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not exactly
fun.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #3  
Old August 12th 17, 12:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,553
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Friday, August 11, 2017 at 6:54:57 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands (Vaals) to
Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed bike on the bike path,
put it in 12th gear and hammer those 20 miles. I did the same distance
here (Cameron Park to Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing
in with fast traffic at times which some potentially interested cyclists
don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt field for half a mile,
including crossing a muddy creek and lifting the bike over some low
fences. Hardly anyone would be willing to do the latter. On the way back
it was mostly along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not exactly
fun.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Lifting a bike over low fences? Sounds a lot like trespassing onto private land.

What is it with you that you have such difficulty riding where so mqany others ride without fear? Oh I know, a fw others share your fears and thus bicycvling is extremely dangerous.

But then again, thousands of others across the U.S.A. and Canada ride on rodes with 55 mph sopeed limits and they do it without fear or problems.

Cheers

Cheers
  #4  
Old August 12th 17, 12:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 7,941
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/11/2017 4:37 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, August 11, 2017 at 6:54:57 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands (Vaals) to
Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed bike on the bike path,
put it in 12th gear and hammer those 20 miles. I did the same distance
here (Cameron Park to Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing
in with fast traffic at times which some potentially interested cyclists
don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt field for half a mile,
including crossing a muddy creek and lifting the bike over some low
fences. Hardly anyone would be willing to do the latter. On the way back
it was mostly along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not exactly
fun.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Lifting a bike over low fences? Sounds a lot like trespassing onto private land.

What is it with you that you have such difficulty riding where so mqany others ride without fear? Oh I know, a fw others share your fears and thus bicycvling is extremely dangerous.


In the area Joerg is referring to, the issue is that not many others
ride, because of fear of riding on US50, a legitimate fear.
.

I would never move to a place like that if I was interested in
transportational cycling.


  #5  
Old August 12th 17, 01:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 8,769
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/11/2017 5:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf



This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley
Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S.
has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the
highest death rate.



No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those
countries, Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the
numbers on slide 6 are what they are.

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands
(Vaals) to Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed
bike on the bike path, put it in 12th gear and hammer those
20 miles. I did the same distance here (Cameron Park to
Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing in with
fast traffic at times which some potentially interested
cyclists don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt
field for half a mile, including crossing a muddy creek and
lifting the bike over some low fences. Hardly anyone would
be willing to do the latter. On the way back it was mostly
along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not exactly fun.


But there's no end to that argument.

People who live at a bus stop and work at another think
buses are wonderful. But resources are finite and so for
some people they are merely inconvenient but for most people
buses are not useful in any way.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #6  
Old August 12th 17, 01:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,060
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/11/2017 6:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf



This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S. has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the highest death
rate.



No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those countries,
Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the numbers on slide 6 are
what they are.


Wow, those U.S. numbers! 44 cyclists killed per billion kilometers of
bicycle travel!

Let's see... that means there are 14.1 MILLION miles ridden for every
bike fatality. Hmm. Putting it that way, it just doesn't sound dangerous.

Let's try another way. How many miles do you ride in a year, Joerg?
Would you guess 3000? If so, and if you are of only average skill
(probably the case), you'll reach a 50% chance of dying on the bike
after just 4,700 years of riding.

Maybe after you've ridden for a thousand years or so, you ought to take
a cycling class. It will improve your odds considerably.

I did the same distance [20 miles]
here (Cameron Park to Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing
in with fast traffic at times which some potentially interested cyclists
don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt field for half a mile,
including crossing a muddy creek and lifting the bike over some low
fences. Hardly anyone would be willing to do the latter.


I'd say only those paranoid of traffic would even consider it! Sheesh!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #7  
Old August 12th 17, 01:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,060
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/11/2017 8:00 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/11/2017 5:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf




This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley
Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S.
has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the
highest death rate.



No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those
countries, Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the
numbers on slide 6 are what they are.

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands
(Vaals) to Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed
bike on the bike path, put it in 12th gear and hammer those
20 miles. I did the same distance here (Cameron Park to
Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing in with
fast traffic at times which some potentially interested
cyclists don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt
field for half a mile, including crossing a muddy creek and
lifting the bike over some low fences. Hardly anyone would
be willing to do the latter. On the way back it was mostly
along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not exactly fun.


But there's no end to that argument.

People who live at a bus stop and work at another think buses are
wonderful. But resources are finite and so for some people they are
merely inconvenient but for most people buses are not useful in any way.


I have a couple friends who do like buses. I rode yesterday with a guy
who likes to use the bus to get out toward a distant bike trail. But
when we first moved to town and had just one car, I looked into riding a
bus the seven or so miles to work. It would have taken far longer than
just biking the whole way.

But for most people, I think this Onion article is accurate:
http://www.theonion.com/article/repo...ublic-tra-1434

"Take the bus. I'll be glad you did." ;-)

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #8  
Old August 12th 17, 01:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,769
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/11/2017 7:23 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/11/2017 8:00 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/11/2017 5:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf




This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley
Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S.
has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the
highest death rate.


No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those
countries, Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the
numbers on slide 6 are what they are.

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands
(Vaals) to Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed
bike on the bike path, put it in 12th gear and hammer those
20 miles. I did the same distance here (Cameron Park to
Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing in with
fast traffic at times which some potentially interested
cyclists don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt
field for half a mile, including crossing a muddy creek and
lifting the bike over some low fences. Hardly anyone would
be willing to do the latter. On the way back it was mostly
along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not
exactly fun.


But there's no end to that argument.

People who live at a bus stop and work at another think
buses are wonderful. But resources are finite and so for
some people they are merely inconvenient but for most
people buses are not useful in any way.


I have a couple friends who do like buses. I rode yesterday
with a guy who likes to use the bus to get out toward a
distant bike trail. But when we first moved to town and had
just one car, I looked into riding a bus the seven or so
miles to work. It would have taken far longer than just
biking the whole way.

But for most people, I think this Onion article is accurate:
http://www.theonion.com/article/repo...ublic-tra-1434


"Take the bus. I'll be glad you did." ;-)


Yes, that's one of their all-time best.

My point, though, is that a paved kiddie path from every
residence to every destination is ridiculous.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #9  
Old August 12th 17, 03:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,883
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Friday, August 11, 2017 at 5:45:38 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/11/2017 7:23 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/11/2017 8:00 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/11/2017 5:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf




This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley
Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S.
has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the
highest death rate.


No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those
countries, Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the
numbers on slide 6 are what they are.

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands
(Vaals) to Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed
bike on the bike path, put it in 12th gear and hammer those
20 miles. I did the same distance here (Cameron Park to
Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing in with
fast traffic at times which some potentially interested
cyclists don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt
field for half a mile, including crossing a muddy creek and
lifting the bike over some low fences. Hardly anyone would
be willing to do the latter. On the way back it was mostly
along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not
exactly fun.


But there's no end to that argument.

People who live at a bus stop and work at another think
buses are wonderful. But resources are finite and so for
some people they are merely inconvenient but for most
people buses are not useful in any way.


I have a couple friends who do like buses. I rode yesterday
with a guy who likes to use the bus to get out toward a
distant bike trail. But when we first moved to town and had
just one car, I looked into riding a bus the seven or so
miles to work. It would have taken far longer than just
biking the whole way.

But for most people, I think this Onion article is accurate:
http://www.theonion.com/article/repo...ublic-tra-1434


"Take the bus. I'll be glad you did." ;-)


Yes, that's one of their all-time best.

My point, though, is that a paved kiddie path from every
residence to every destination is ridiculous.


And my point is that IF you have separate bicycle facilities like that car drivers again believe you don't belong on their roads.
  #10  
Old August 12th 17, 03:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,292
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-11 17:45, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/11/2017 7:23 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/11/2017 8:00 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/11/2017 5:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-11 15:05, sms wrote:
https://bikesiliconvalley.org/wp-content/uploads/170808-5B-Alta-Level-of-Traffic-Stress-Knowles.pdf





This was one of the presentations at the Silicon Valley
Bicycle
Coalition Bike Summit.

Slide 6 is especially telling. No surprise that the U.S.
has the lowest
number of bicycle travel in terms of distance, and the
highest death rate.


No surprise to me whatsoever. I lived in three of those
countries, Germany, Netherlands and US and can see why the
numbers on slide 6 are what they are.

When I had to ride from where I lived in the Netherlands
(Vaals) to Maastricht I could pretty much set my 12-speed
bike on the bike path, put it in 12th gear and hammer those
20 miles. I did the same distance here (Cameron Park to
Folsom) yesterday for an errand. Aside from mixing in with
fast traffic at times which some potentially interested
cyclists don't like I also had to hack it across a dirt
field for half a mile, including crossing a muddy creek and
lifting the bike over some low fences. Hardly anyone would
be willing to do the latter. On the way back it was mostly
along a county road with 55mph traffic, ok but not
exactly fun.


But there's no end to that argument.

People who live at a bus stop and work at another think
buses are wonderful. But resources are finite and so for
some people they are merely inconvenient but for most
people buses are not useful in any way.


I have a couple friends who do like buses. I rode yesterday
with a guy who likes to use the bus to get out toward a
distant bike trail. But when we first moved to town and had
just one car, I looked into riding a bus the seven or so
miles to work. It would have taken far longer than just
biking the whole way.

But for most people, I think this Onion article is accurate:
http://www.theonion.com/article/repo...ublic-tra-1434



"Take the bus. I'll be glad you did." ;-)


Yes, that's one of their all-time best.

My point, though, is that a paved kiddie path from every residence to
every destination is ridiculous.


Those are not kiddie paths and they do almost go from residence to
destination in the Netherlands. The only way to experience this is to
actually stay there a few weeks and ride all the time.

When I worked in Hengelo we rented a house sight-unseen and split the
cost between four people. When I got there it turned out to have a bike
path right in front and the company also had a bike path system
connector straight into a massive bicycle parking lot. At one section we
had three lanes on the bike path while car drivers only had two. Having
grown up in Germany I was pleasantly surprised but the three others who
grew up in the Netherlands considered that to be normal.

You don't need it to every house. Folsom is an example how to do it
correctly. They have built a network of bike paths going through nearly
all residential and many commercial areas. Most destinations require a
few hundred yards of street riding but that is on low-traffic streets.
Except in some inner city areas but the very skittish could always hop
off and push the bike on a sidewalk for a few yards (I always ride in
the street).

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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