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Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure



 
 
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  #101  
Old August 17th 17, 07:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,303
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-16 17:29, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:52:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:49, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:05:08 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 23:15, John B. wrote:


[...]

Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.


Look at where he does most of his business though.

Today, yes.

The point though was that Branson started a business selling bootleg
records from the trunk of his car and built it into a billion dollar
business. Although you argue that there is so much to impede a startup
business in Europe.



Selling bootleg records is illegal in Britain and almost anywhere else
if that hasn't occurred to you yet. You can start a "business" that way
in any country as long as they don't arrest you.


Certainly. As Branson described it they were records made in France
and brought into England without paying import duty.

I meant starting the honest way. I did, in Europe. And in the US.


The point is that in spite of your claim of how difficult it is to
start a business in Europe Branson started a multi-billion quid
business in the simplest way possible, selling stuff out of the trunk
of his car. Thus, it appears that starting a business is not that
difficult.



According to what you wrote above he broke the law, plain and simple.
Lots of people build businesses by breaking the law. That does not make
it right and does not prove a good business climate.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
Ads
  #102  
Old August 18th 17, 01:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,175
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:36:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:41, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:55:26 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:55, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:09:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 20:09, jbeattie wrote:

[...]

... After Prop 13, there
are few property tax dollars for transportation projects. Maybe SMS
can weigh in on this. But I do know you pay practically nothing for
property tax. I probably paid that much 20 years ago for a dinger
house in a sketchy part of town.


Why did you do that?

Assuming that you are a normal, intelligent person the question might
arise as to why you immigrated almost half way round the world to
settle in a state with, perhaps the highest tax burden in the U.S.,
and now complain about it?


Sometimes people have to do job-related moves.

Ah, you mean that design of small electronic devise was no longer done
in Europe so one had to immigrate the New World?


Cutting edge medical ultrasound technology had dried up rather fast over
there. That was my field of work.


Then, like in my case, one can hardly predict when years later a IMO not
very competent governor ruins the works. Oh well, some day we might
move. Southern Utah looks good. So does Northern Arizona.


But Good Lord! How else can the government get the money to build the
bicycle paths that you demand in the name of SAFETY unless they DO
increase taxes?


They increase taxes to give government workers a whopping 50% retirement
raise. Now the local and state bureaucracies no longer know how they are
ever going to pay for that.


Are you sure about that?

My understanding was that retirement for state employees was funded by
CalPERS which I read has, as of June 30, 2014, CalPERS managed the
largest public pension fund in the United States, with $300.3 billion
in assets.

But you seem to be saying that the retirement for the 1.6 million
(2014) retired state employees is paid directly by the California
state government.


After all, any suggestion of asking the bicycling public to pay for
their tiny little highways meets with a united front - "WE DON'T WANNA
PAY!" So what else can the state do? Why, tax everyone. In this way
the bicycling fanatics won't be singled out as if everyone is taxed
then everyone is treated equally. Political correctness at its best!



No. Privatize. Hire non-government contractors to build bike paths. That
is cheaper and result in better quality. We've got some prime examples
in my area how not to do it.


But where is the money coming from? You don't want to pay taxes but
you want non-government contractors. Are there non-governmental
contractors that work for free?

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #103  
Old August 18th 17, 02:04 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,175
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:37:58 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:29, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:52:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:49, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:05:08 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 23:15, John B. wrote:

[...]

Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.


Look at where he does most of his business though.

Today, yes.

The point though was that Branson started a business selling bootleg
records from the trunk of his car and built it into a billion dollar
business. Although you argue that there is so much to impede a startup
business in Europe.


Selling bootleg records is illegal in Britain and almost anywhere else
if that hasn't occurred to you yet. You can start a "business" that way
in any country as long as they don't arrest you.


Certainly. As Branson described it they were records made in France
and brought into England without paying import duty.

I meant starting the honest way. I did, in Europe. And in the US.


The point is that in spite of your claim of how difficult it is to
start a business in Europe Branson started a multi-billion quid
business in the simplest way possible, selling stuff out of the trunk
of his car. Thus, it appears that starting a business is not that
difficult.



According to what you wrote above he broke the law, plain and simple.
Lots of people build businesses by breaking the law. That does not make
it right and does not prove a good business climate.


What in the world does that have to do with anything. We are talking
about starting a business and you keep discovering arguments why it
won't work, when Branson is standing right there in front of you
counting his money.

The fact is that the British government did subsequently investigate
Branson for failure to pay taxes and, I believe, that he did make some
sort of payment to the government to resolve the problem.

So, apparently the British government is satisfied and Branson is
counting his money, and you are arguing that "it won't work".


--
Cheers,

John B.

  #104  
Old August 18th 17, 02:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,780
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/17/2017 7:57 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:36:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:41, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:55:26 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:55, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:09:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 20:09, jbeattie wrote:

[...]

... After Prop 13, there
are few property tax dollars for transportation projects. Maybe SMS
can weigh in on this. But I do know you pay practically nothing for
property tax. I probably paid that much 20 years ago for a dinger
house in a sketchy part of town.


Why did you do that?

Assuming that you are a normal, intelligent person the question might
arise as to why you immigrated almost half way round the world to
settle in a state with, perhaps the highest tax burden in the U.S.,
and now complain about it?


Sometimes people have to do job-related moves.

Ah, you mean that design of small electronic devise was no longer done
in Europe so one had to immigrate the New World?


Cutting edge medical ultrasound technology had dried up rather fast over
there. That was my field of work.


Then, like in my case, one can hardly predict when years later a IMO not
very competent governor ruins the works. Oh well, some day we might
move. Southern Utah looks good. So does Northern Arizona.

But Good Lord! How else can the government get the money to build the
bicycle paths that you demand in the name of SAFETY unless they DO
increase taxes?


They increase taxes to give government workers a whopping 50% retirement
raise. Now the local and state bureaucracies no longer know how they are
ever going to pay for that.


Are you sure about that?

My understanding was that retirement for state employees was funded by
CalPERS which I read has, as of June 30, 2014, CalPERS managed the
largest public pension fund in the United States, with $300.3 billion
in assets.

But you seem to be saying that the retirement for the 1.6 million
(2014) retired state employees is paid directly by the California
state government.


After all, any suggestion of asking the bicycling public to pay for
their tiny little highways meets with a united front - "WE DON'T WANNA
PAY!" So what else can the state do? Why, tax everyone. In this way
the bicycling fanatics won't be singled out as if everyone is taxed
then everyone is treated equally. Political correctness at its best!



No. Privatize. Hire non-government contractors to build bike paths. That
is cheaper and result in better quality. We've got some prime examples
in my area how not to do it.


But where is the money coming from? You don't want to pay taxes but
you want non-government contractors. Are there non-governmental
contractors that work for free?


in re pension/benefit obligations:

http://www.governing.com/gov-data/st...ions-data.html

It's not just New Jersey and Illinois- they just got caught
sooner[1].

One might think that $300 billion of assets is a large pile
of money. In the real world, maybe. For Calpers, it is not.
It's insufficient and their earnings projections are pure
fantasy - they fall short every year. A public stock company
who tried a pale portion of public pension shenaningans
would see its directors & officers jailed and the firm
bankrupted promptly.

It's worse than that chart shows as the off-book unfunded
public obligations are not huge, they are garganatuan.

My state is an absolute anomaly with full funding. The rest
suck to various degrees of profligacy all of which will
punish their children severely from destitution to slavery
and nothing is getting any better.

But hey, any politician will vote for spending whose bill is
due after his terms are at an end. Adults with adult
sensibilities are scarce in the field.


[1] Puerto Rico is in a class by itself, sadly.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #105  
Old August 18th 17, 03:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,780
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/17/2017 8:04 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:37:58 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:29, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:52:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:49, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:05:08 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 23:15, John B. wrote:

[...]

Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.


Look at where he does most of his business though.

Today, yes.

The point though was that Branson started a business selling bootleg
records from the trunk of his car and built it into a billion dollar
business. Although you argue that there is so much to impede a startup
business in Europe.


Selling bootleg records is illegal in Britain and almost anywhere else
if that hasn't occurred to you yet. You can start a "business" that way
in any country as long as they don't arrest you.


Certainly. As Branson described it they were records made in France
and brought into England without paying import duty.

I meant starting the honest way. I did, in Europe. And in the US.

The point is that in spite of your claim of how difficult it is to
start a business in Europe Branson started a multi-billion quid
business in the simplest way possible, selling stuff out of the trunk
of his car. Thus, it appears that starting a business is not that
difficult.



According to what you wrote above he broke the law, plain and simple.
Lots of people build businesses by breaking the law. That does not make
it right and does not prove a good business climate.


What in the world does that have to do with anything. We are talking
about starting a business and you keep discovering arguments why it
won't work, when Branson is standing right there in front of you
counting his money.

The fact is that the British government did subsequently investigate
Branson for failure to pay taxes and, I believe, that he did make some
sort of payment to the government to resolve the problem.

So, apparently the British government is satisfied and Branson is
counting his money, and you are arguing that "it won't work".


Hell who hasn't done similar?

My first import business consisted of buying Postal Money
orders for Sterling on payday, mailing them to a friend in
England who sent me Czech tubulars marked "Goods of British
Origin" as selling communist goods was illegal here [1]. As
long as I sold most of them before the rent was due, I came
out OK.

Legal businesses just do not have much net margin which is I
think what Joerg implied.

[1] Barum made very nice quality tubulars at a great price
even after my filthy margin.
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #106  
Old August 18th 17, 04:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,175
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 21:01:47 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 8/17/2017 8:04 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:37:58 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:29, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:52:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:49, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:05:08 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 23:15, John B. wrote:

[...]

Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.


Look at where he does most of his business though.

Today, yes.

The point though was that Branson started a business selling bootleg
records from the trunk of his car and built it into a billion dollar
business. Although you argue that there is so much to impede a startup
business in Europe.


Selling bootleg records is illegal in Britain and almost anywhere else
if that hasn't occurred to you yet. You can start a "business" that way
in any country as long as they don't arrest you.


Certainly. As Branson described it they were records made in France
and brought into England without paying import duty.

I meant starting the honest way. I did, in Europe. And in the US.

The point is that in spite of your claim of how difficult it is to
start a business in Europe Branson started a multi-billion quid
business in the simplest way possible, selling stuff out of the trunk
of his car. Thus, it appears that starting a business is not that
difficult.


According to what you wrote above he broke the law, plain and simple.
Lots of people build businesses by breaking the law. That does not make
it right and does not prove a good business climate.


What in the world does that have to do with anything. We are talking
about starting a business and you keep discovering arguments why it
won't work, when Branson is standing right there in front of you
counting his money.

The fact is that the British government did subsequently investigate
Branson for failure to pay taxes and, I believe, that he did make some
sort of payment to the government to resolve the problem.

So, apparently the British government is satisfied and Branson is
counting his money, and you are arguing that "it won't work".


Hell who hasn't done similar?

My first import business consisted of buying Postal Money
orders for Sterling on payday, mailing them to a friend in
England who sent me Czech tubulars marked "Goods of British
Origin" as selling communist goods was illegal here [1]. As
long as I sold most of them before the rent was due, I came
out OK.


When I was in Vietnam busily making the world safe from communism, I
order a packet of 1/2" x 13 tpi taps through the USAF supply system.
The taps duly arrived and each tap was lovingly marked "Product of
Yugoslavia".

Legal businesses just do not have much net margin which is I
think what Joerg implied.


One can only speculate where the modern sellers of marijuana, in the
states where it is now legal, got their start?

[1] Barum made very nice quality tubulars at a great price
even after my filthy margin.

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #107  
Old August 18th 17, 04:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,175
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 20:56:24 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 8/17/2017 7:57 PM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:36:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:41, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:55:26 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:55, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:09:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 20:09, jbeattie wrote:

[...]

... After Prop 13, there
are few property tax dollars for transportation projects. Maybe SMS
can weigh in on this. But I do know you pay practically nothing for
property tax. I probably paid that much 20 years ago for a dinger
house in a sketchy part of town.


Why did you do that?

Assuming that you are a normal, intelligent person the question might
arise as to why you immigrated almost half way round the world to
settle in a state with, perhaps the highest tax burden in the U.S.,
and now complain about it?


Sometimes people have to do job-related moves.

Ah, you mean that design of small electronic devise was no longer done
in Europe so one had to immigrate the New World?


Cutting edge medical ultrasound technology had dried up rather fast over
there. That was my field of work.


Then, like in my case, one can hardly predict when years later a IMO not
very competent governor ruins the works. Oh well, some day we might
move. Southern Utah looks good. So does Northern Arizona.

But Good Lord! How else can the government get the money to build the
bicycle paths that you demand in the name of SAFETY unless they DO
increase taxes?


They increase taxes to give government workers a whopping 50% retirement
raise. Now the local and state bureaucracies no longer know how they are
ever going to pay for that.


Are you sure about that?

My understanding was that retirement for state employees was funded by
CalPERS which I read has, as of June 30, 2014, CalPERS managed the
largest public pension fund in the United States, with $300.3 billion
in assets.

But you seem to be saying that the retirement for the 1.6 million
(2014) retired state employees is paid directly by the California
state government.


After all, any suggestion of asking the bicycling public to pay for
their tiny little highways meets with a united front - "WE DON'T WANNA
PAY!" So what else can the state do? Why, tax everyone. In this way
the bicycling fanatics won't be singled out as if everyone is taxed
then everyone is treated equally. Political correctness at its best!


No. Privatize. Hire non-government contractors to build bike paths. That
is cheaper and result in better quality. We've got some prime examples
in my area how not to do it.


But where is the money coming from? You don't want to pay taxes but
you want non-government contractors. Are there non-governmental
contractors that work for free?


in re pension/benefit obligations:

http://www.governing.com/gov-data/st...ions-data.html

It's not just New Jersey and Illinois- they just got caught
sooner[1].

One might think that $300 billion of assets is a large pile
of money. In the real world, maybe. For Calpers, it is not.
It's insufficient and their earnings projections are pure
fantasy - they fall short every year. A public stock company
who tried a pale portion of public pension shenaningans
would see its directors & officers jailed and the firm
bankrupted promptly.

It's worse than that chart shows as the off-book unfunded
public obligations are not huge, they are garganatuan.

My state is an absolute anomaly with full funding. The rest
suck to various degrees of profligacy all of which will
punish their children severely from destitution to slavery
and nothing is getting any better.

But hey, any politician will vote for spending whose bill is
due after his terms are at an end. Adults with adult
sensibilities are scarce in the field.


[1] Puerto Rico is in a class by itself, sadly.


I firmly believe that the majority of government spending is based on
only a couple, maybe three, things. (1) what will get me reelected,
(2) what will get me the most help in getting reelected and (3) what
will gets me the most votes so that I can be reelected.

Look at medical schemes.

In Thailand a Thai citizen pay 30 baht ( 1/10th of the minimum daily
salary) to visit a State clinic. All medical treatment and medicines
prescribed by the doctor is free.

This system was originally yet another reason to elect the Shinawat
regime who effectively bought Thailand and is, of course, so popular
that no future government would dare to change it.

Compare this with the U.S.

Then compare the pharmaceutical industry of Thailand and the U.S.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #108  
Old August 18th 17, 08:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,303
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-17 17:57, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:36:35 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:41, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:55:26 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:55, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:09:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 20:09, jbeattie wrote:

[...]

... After Prop 13, there
are few property tax dollars for transportation projects. Maybe SMS
can weigh in on this. But I do know you pay practically nothing for
property tax. I probably paid that much 20 years ago for a dinger
house in a sketchy part of town.


Why did you do that?

Assuming that you are a normal, intelligent person the question might
arise as to why you immigrated almost half way round the world to
settle in a state with, perhaps the highest tax burden in the U.S.,
and now complain about it?


Sometimes people have to do job-related moves.

Ah, you mean that design of small electronic devise was no longer done
in Europe so one had to immigrate the New World?


Cutting edge medical ultrasound technology had dried up rather fast over
there. That was my field of work.


Then, like in my case, one can hardly predict when years later a IMO not
very competent governor ruins the works. Oh well, some day we might
move. Southern Utah looks good. So does Northern Arizona.

But Good Lord! How else can the government get the money to build the
bicycle paths that you demand in the name of SAFETY unless they DO
increase taxes?


They increase taxes to give government workers a whopping 50% retirement
raise. Now the local and state bureaucracies no longer know how they are
ever going to pay for that.


Are you sure about that?


Yes.


My understanding was that retirement for state employees was funded by
CalPERS which I read has, as of June 30, 2014, CalPERS managed the
largest public pension fund in the United States, with $300.3 billion
in assets.

But you seem to be saying that the retirement for the 1.6 million
(2014) retired state employees is paid directly by the California
state government.


In essence it is. CalPERS got a blank check. Because of wanton doling
out of increases they are now grossly underfunded. So they send the
government a yearly bill. "This is how many billions we need this year
and this is, therefore, what you owe us".


After all, any suggestion of asking the bicycling public to pay for
their tiny little highways meets with a united front - "WE DON'T WANNA
PAY!" So what else can the state do? Why, tax everyone. In this way
the bicycling fanatics won't be singled out as if everyone is taxed
then everyone is treated equally. Political correctness at its best!



No. Privatize. Hire non-government contractors to build bike paths. That
is cheaper and result in better quality. We've got some prime examples
in my area how not to do it.


But where is the money coming from? You don't want to pay taxes but
you want non-government contractors. Are there non-governmental
contractors that work for free?


I am gladly willing to pay taxes if they are used effectively. _Not_
like they did on a local county road where they re-dedicated a shoulder
into a glorified bike lane and "re-paved" it. Ever since that time it is
the lumpiest piece of asphalt I ride on. In contrast, there are
residential neighborhoods nearby where roads and bike paths have been
built by private contractors. Smooth as silk even after years of trucks
rolling across.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #109  
Old August 18th 17, 08:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,303
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-17 18:04, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 11:37:58 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-16 17:29, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 16 Aug 2017 06:52:32 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-15 16:49, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:05:08 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-08-14 23:15, John B. wrote:

[...]

Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.


Look at where he does most of his business though.

Today, yes.

The point though was that Branson started a business selling bootleg
records from the trunk of his car and built it into a billion dollar
business. Although you argue that there is so much to impede a startup
business in Europe.


Selling bootleg records is illegal in Britain and almost anywhere else
if that hasn't occurred to you yet. You can start a "business" that way
in any country as long as they don't arrest you.


Certainly. As Branson described it they were records made in France
and brought into England without paying import duty.

I meant starting the honest way. I did, in Europe. And in the US.

The point is that in spite of your claim of how difficult it is to
start a business in Europe Branson started a multi-billion quid
business in the simplest way possible, selling stuff out of the trunk
of his car. Thus, it appears that starting a business is not that
difficult.



According to what you wrote above he broke the law, plain and simple.
Lots of people build businesses by breaking the law. That does not make
it right and does not prove a good business climate.


What in the world does that have to do with anything. We are talking
about starting a business and you keep discovering arguments why it
won't work, when Branson is standing right there in front of you
counting his money.


Joaquin Guzman also stood in front of us counting his money.


The fact is that the British government did subsequently investigate
Branson for failure to pay taxes and, I believe, that he did make some
sort of payment to the government to resolve the problem.


Ah yes, that makes selling bootleg records as you said ok?


So, apparently the British government is satisfied and Branson is
counting his money, and you are arguing that "it won't work".


Again, according to what you wrote he started his business via _illegal_
activity.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #110  
Old August 19th 17, 02:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 7,950
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/18/2017 12:52 PM, Joerg wrote:

In essence it is. CalPERS got a blank check. Because of wanton doling
out of increases they are now grossly underfunded. So they send the
government a yearly bill. "This is how many billions we need this year
and this is, therefore, what you owe us".


It's not the "wanton doling out of increases," the increases are
determined by formulas put into place when the employee is hired, no one
increases it "wantonly." Many cities have taken steps to reduce the
pension costs for the long term, but in the short term there will be a
lot of retirees collecting pensions for decades.

The real cause of the CalPERS under-funding is the reduction in the
predicted rate of return on investments. Every time CalPERS reduces the
predicted return, the local and state governments have to ante up the
difference. As an elected official, I now get to worry about this!

A reduction of 0.5% in the predicted rate of return may not sound like
much, but even for a moderately sized city it can amount to a lot of
money in additional funding. See
https://www.calpers.ca.gov/page/newsroom/calpers-news/2016/calpers-lower-discount-rate.

http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-le-me-richmond-pensions/.

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