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Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure



 
 
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  #71  
Old August 14th 17, 10:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,394
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/14/2017 1:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation. The
Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax every year
for the last three years to "fix the roads" and still haven't done
anything more than patched them in the most egregious places.


Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning and
building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just themselves.
Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe. And
yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as bike
paths.


You complain a lot about America. Why not move back to Europe?


--
- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #72  
Old August 15th 17, 01:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,557
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Mon, 14 Aug 2017 15:41:54 -0700, sms
wrote:

On 8/14/2017 10:55 AM, Joerg wrote:

We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe. And
yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as bike
paths.


Yet the net tax burden is less in the U.S.. And California property
taxes are less, as a percentage of the property value, than many other
states. California is 17th lowest.


Years ago I was living in Riverside California while my parents lived
in a small town in New Hampshire. They visited us one year (long drive
:-) and I remember my father asking me what my property taxes were.
When I told him he sort of laughed and replied, "that is less then our
winter heating costs".
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #73  
Old August 15th 17, 03:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,394
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 8/14/2017 6:11 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 14:55, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/14/2017 1:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation. The
Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax every year
for the last three years to "fix the roads" and still haven't done
anything more than patched them in the most egregious places.

Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning and
building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just themselves.
Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe.
And yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as
bike paths.


You complain a lot about America. Why not move back to Europe?


Since November I am not complaining too much :-)

When one has lived in several countries one can compare and try to bring
some of the better ideas to the new place. America has some major
upsides versus Europe such as better fostering of free enterprise (on
the federal level, not the Californian level)


So the only major upside of America you mention doesn't exist in
California? But you chose to live in California?

You're not sounding brilliant, Joerg.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #74  
Old August 15th 17, 04:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,769
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 1:45:44 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 13:27, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 10:55:54 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation.
The Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax every
year for the last three years to "fix the roads" and still
haven't done anything more than patched them in the most
egregious places.

Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning and
building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just
themselves. Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10
(ten!) times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in
Europe. And yes, I do expect something in return for that much
money. Such as bike paths.

That's it! Try triple that in Portland -- or more, if you have a nice
house. ...



Time you guys had a taxpayer revolt like the Californian Proposition 13.
I know a guy in New York who had a decent academic-level income yet his
family was essentially taxed out of their home. There are reasons why
New York, Orgeon and lots of other places are not on my list of
potential retirement places.


What the f*** are you complaining about? You think that for
four-measly-thousand you're going to get bike trails to your door.
You're crazy! Plus property taxes don't pay for transportation
infrastructure -- that is funded through transportation taxes,
usually the gas tax with general fund input.


http://www.frontiergroup.org/reports/fg/who-pays-roads

Quote "Most walking and bicycling takes place on local streets and roads
that are primarily paid for through property taxes and other general
local taxes".


Well, that's just wrong -- particularly for you. AFAIK, property taxes in California may pay a tiny part of certain transportation projects -- like mass transit, highway lighting or pot-hole filling. They're not being used to build bike paths. Look at your tax bill and see if there are any bonds for bicycle infrastructure. And read this: http://www.calbike.org/funding_sources After Prop 13, there are few property tax dollars for transportation projects. Maybe SMS can weigh in on this. But I do know you pay practically nothing for property tax. I probably paid that much 20 years ago for a dinger house in a sketchy part of town.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #75  
Old August 15th 17, 07:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,557
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Mon, 14 Aug 2017 22:00:57 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/14/2017 6:11 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 14:55, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/14/2017 1:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation. The
Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax every year
for the last three years to "fix the roads" and still haven't done
anything more than patched them in the most egregious places.

Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning and
building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just themselves.
Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe.
And yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as
bike paths.

You complain a lot about America. Why not move back to Europe?


Since November I am not complaining too much :-)

When one has lived in several countries one can compare and try to bring
some of the better ideas to the new place. America has some major
upsides versus Europe such as better fostering of free enterprise (on
the federal level, not the Californian level)


So the only major upside of America you mention doesn't exist in
California? But you chose to live in California?

You're not sounding brilliant, Joerg.


Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #76  
Old August 15th 17, 03:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,624
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-14 23:15, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 14 Aug 2017 22:00:57 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/14/2017 6:11 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 14:55, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/14/2017 1:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation. The
Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax every year
for the last three years to "fix the roads" and still haven't done
anything more than patched them in the most egregious places.

Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning and
building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just themselves.
Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe.
And yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as
bike paths.

You complain a lot about America. Why not move back to Europe?


Since November I am not complaining too much :-)

When one has lived in several countries one can compare and try to bring
some of the better ideas to the new place. America has some major
upsides versus Europe such as better fostering of free enterprise (on
the federal level, not the Californian level)


So the only major upside of America you mention doesn't exist in
California?



To a large extent it doesn't.


... But you chose to live in California?


No. My employer chose that. IWe would like to move out of state but
moving is such a hassle. One of the main things holding us back is our
engagement in church and in the community. We are not special but, for
example, it would be hard to find someone else willing to be with
Alzheimer's patient (without getting nightmares after every time) and
also has certified therapy dogs for this sort of service.


You're not sounding brilliant, Joerg.



You are the master of premature conclusions. Judging without knowing the
facts.


Given that the Virgin Group (net worth 5 - 5.5 billion Sterling,
estimated in 2014) started with Richard Branson selling bootleg
records out of the trunk of his car, it doesn't sound like a business
is too difficult to get going in Europe.



Look at where he does most of his business though.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #77  
Old August 15th 17, 03:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,624
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On 2017-08-14 20:09, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 1:45:44 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 13:27, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 10:55:54 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive
taxation. The Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax
every year for the last three years to "fix the roads" and
still haven't done anything more than patched them in the
most egregious places.

Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning
and building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just
themselves. Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10
(ten!) times more than what we paid for a house of similar
value in Europe. And yes, I do expect something in return for
that much money. Such as bike paths.

That's it! Try triple that in Portland -- or more, if you have a
nice house. ...



Time you guys had a taxpayer revolt like the Californian
Proposition 13. I know a guy in New York who had a decent
academic-level income yet his family was essentially taxed out of
their home. There are reasons why New York, Orgeon and lots of
other places are not on my list of potential retirement places.


What the f*** are you complaining about? You think that for
four-measly-thousand you're going to get bike trails to your
door. You're crazy! Plus property taxes don't pay for
transportation infrastructure -- that is funded through
transportation taxes, usually the gas tax with general fund
input.


http://www.frontiergroup.org/reports/fg/who-pays-roads

Quote "Most walking and bicycling takes place on local streets and
roads that are primarily paid for through property taxes and other
general local taxes".


Well, that's just wrong -- particularly for you. AFAIK, property
taxes in California may pay a tiny part of certain transportation
projects -- like mass transit, highway lighting or pot-hole filling.
They're not being used to build bike paths. Look at your tax bill and
see if there are any bonds for bicycle infrastructure. And read
this: http://www.calbike.org/funding_sources



Quote from your link "Most of that is generated by your city or county"

So how do they get it? Out of thin air? Print it cladestinely?

Local taxes have two major sources, property taxes and sales taxes. We
contribute to both and expect something for that.


... After Prop 13, there
are few property tax dollars for transportation projects. Maybe SMS
can weigh in on this. But I do know you pay practically nothing for
property tax. I probably paid that much 20 years ago for a dinger
house in a sketchy part of town.


Why did you do that?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #78  
Old August 15th 17, 03:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
cyclintom@gmail.com
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 2:08:34 PM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 8/14/2017 9:05 AM, wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 7:48:47 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:

Up here in Sacramento they would but you'd first have to get in a more
biz-friendly legislature and that ain't gonna happen.


The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation. The Federal government is nearly as bad.


Yet jobs and businesses are being created in California at a very high
rate compared to other states.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-business-climate-20160102-story.html

http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-california-econ-growth-20160722-snap-story.html

Don't fall for the myths about businesses and people leaving. Sure
people move out of every state, but California has a very low rate of
out-migration, and those leaving are far exceeded by those coming in.

Businesses want to be in California, as do their employees, and this
isn't necessarily a good thing. It would be a lot better if the tech
companies could spread the wealth across the country.


Businesses want to be in California until they put up with it. The "growth" really doesn't exist. It's mostly from Google, Facebook and the like. There are start-ups in Silicon Valley that demand the most rediculous things from their employees and no one will work for them and they fail.

Tesla called me up and did they want someone who could competently do a job they needed? No - they wanted someone that would worship the idea of Tesla.. No company that does these sorts of things can exist for long. I don't see how Tesla can survive without government grants and they sure as hell aren't going to get them by calling Trump names.


  #79  
Old August 15th 17, 03:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
cyclintom@gmail.com
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 3:46:23 PM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 8/14/2017 10:55 AM, Joerg wrote:

We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe. And
yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as bike
paths.


Yet the net tax burden is less in the U.S.. And California property
taxes are less, as a percentage of the property value, than many other
states. California is 17th lowest.


The ONLY way they can get away with this is because of the tremendous tax base. But that ain't going to work for long with the people with money leaving California.
  #80  
Old August 15th 17, 04:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
cyclintom@gmail.com
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Stress Analysis in the Design of Bicycle Infrastructure

On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 5:21:44 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 14 Aug 2017 17:55:57 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/14/2017 1:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-14 09:56, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 14, 2017 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4,
wrote: Snipped
The entire trouble in California is the excessive taxation. The
Federal government is nearly as bad.

Snipped
You want business growth in the US - stop preventing it by
excessive taxation. Here they have added an addition tax every year
for the last three years to "fix the roads" and still haven't done
anything more than patched them in the most egregious places.

Got to pay for all that bicycling infrastructure planning and
building somehow. Bicyclist aren't going to pay it just themselves.
Thus others re forced to chi; in via taxes.


We pay over $4k/year just in property taxes. That is about 10 (ten!)
times more than what we paid for a house of similar value in Europe. And
yes, I do expect something in return for that much money. Such as bike
paths.


You complain a lot about America. Why not move back to Europe?


What is ignored is that average salaries in Europe are much lower then
in 'The land of opportunity".

As an example, the Web tells us that the *average* Mechanical
Engineering salary in France is 40,250 Euro, approximately US$47,350,
while In The Netherlands (the land of bicycles) it is 38,704 Euro,
about US$45,534.

In the Sacramento area of California it is $70,603.


As an EE with experience I wouldn't work for less than $120,000 and my last job before my injury was a quarter of a million. But I also was managing a team of 5 engineers. Before that I was a department manager and did half of the design and programming for the teams and consulted with NASA and did some boards for the International Space Station. Wish I could remember any of that instead of having to read it off of my resume. As for the money I was making I actually had the pay stubs.
 




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