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  #81  
Old April 23rd 21, 04:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default I am that out of date

On 4/22/2021 5:18 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

I tried one of those Sanyo Dynahub roller generators and did NOT like the beam pattern with the included light/ That beam pattern was a long T with both portions of the T being very narrow. Maybe with a different light it would have been better.


With a different lamp it was indeed better, and in our case still is.

I wasn't satisfied with its original lamp and complained to my friend
who owned a bike shop. He sold me a Union halogen headlamp. That made
the setup acceptable for me. I did quite a lot of night riding that way,
but it did motivate me to play around with other setups.

The Sanyo is now on my wife's bike, with a B&M headlamp. She doesn't
ride much at night, but her setup is extremely good.

I also thought about cutting out a section of rear fender on my cantilever brakes touring bike and then mounting the dynamo to the brake bridge.


IIRC James did something like that.

However the lousy beam pattern meant I had no interest in doing that.


The beam pattern depends on the headlamp. Almost any dyno can drive a
modern LED headlamp with a very good beam.


--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #82  
Old April 24th 21, 12:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default I am that out of date

On Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 10:44:53 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 22:56:12 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 21 Apr 2021 17:00:08 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

I think each one of those allowed riding significantly farther, faster,
more comfortably or safer compared to the technology it replaced.

And everything else I can think of caused much smaller and merely
incremental improvements.


That's the rule for everything. Lacing skins together to get a better
fit wasn't as big an improvment as wearing clothes. The eyed needle
wasn't as big an improvment over lacing as lacing was over just using
the fabric the way you found or made it . . .

and improvements after the invention of the zig-zag sewing machine are
barely detectable.

For most sewing machines, I would agree that progress has been
incremental and not revolutionary.


About 30 years ago I bought my Mother a new fancy sewing machine. Her old sewing machine was a black Singer I assume she got in the 1940s. It still worked just fine. I bought her a brand new machine. I think it was a good brand and machine when I bought it. It was computerized or something. I am a good son!!!!! She uses the sewing machine I got her to fix my clothes.. And lots of other sewing stuff too.




However, in industrial sewing
machines, the introduction of CNC (computerized numerical control)
machines has been revolutionary in terms of what can be done with such
a machine. For example, quilting and embroidery has become heavily
computerized:
http://www.computerizedquiltingmachines.com
I've seen a building full of embroidery machines cranking out
elaborate sports uniforms and hats in different sizes at amazing
speeds. All the material, thread, and fasteners are handled by robot
arms, cut to shape in the machine, and sewn together in a programmed
sequence. The revolution is in the programming, which we don't see in
the final product.

Other possible candidates for revolutionary change might be ultrasonic
stitching, hot glue bonding and paper clothing. These have been
around for several decades, but have not sold well for various
reasons. It's mostly because these changes are visible




to consumers
who tend to be very conservative in their choice of material and
assembly techniques and tend to reject anything revolutionary.


Have you seen any internet stories about what Hollywood people are wearing? I think I have seen them wearing G string bikini things where their whole butt is visible and some with little pieces of metal the size of quarters covering their breasts. And things on their heads that would make a peacock envious. I'm not exactly sure the word "conservative" is applicable.




Incidentally, if you need a good laugh, look at what's being offered
by the industry as the next big thing in fashion:
https://wwd.com
https://wwd.com/wwd-publications/digital-daily/thursdays-digital-daily-april-22-2021/
Hint: The next big thing in fashion is usually what the fringe
elements of society are currently wearing.


--
Jeff Liebermann
PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

  #83  
Old April 24th 21, 12:07 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default I am that out of date

On Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 11:02:05 PM UTC-5, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Then again ten years ago (perhaps earlier) some people were reusing bicycle inner tubes to make clothing. Talk about recycling.


I use bicycle inner tubes, with the valve cut out, for tying stuff up. They work better than bungee cords in certain instances. I advise keeping a couple inner tubes hanging in the garage for impromptu things.
  #85  
Old April 24th 21, 03:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
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Default I am that out of date

On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 14:33:32 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

I remember the arguments of yore in this forum, about who could be
called a "real cyclist." IIRC, many posters thought the "real cyclists"
were the ones who used the posters' equipment choice.


And I say that you aren't a serious cyclist if you can't carry two
gallons of milk, or at least an attaché case.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #86  
Old April 24th 21, 04:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default I am that out of date

On Friday, April 23, 2021 at 9:22:00 PM UTC-5, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 14:33:32 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

I remember the arguments of yore in this forum, about who could be
called a "real cyclist." IIRC, many posters thought the "real cyclists"
were the ones who used the posters' equipment choice.

And I say that you aren't a serious cyclist if you can't carry two
gallons of milk, or at least an attaché case.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


Two gallons of milk? Now disregarding the idea that I would ever ever ever buy two gallons of milk at once, I don't need to have a full spare gallon when I am using the first half of the first gallon. Carrying two gallons is hard. One gallon is easy. I can easily ride one handed and carry the gallon milk in the other. But trying to carry two gallons at once? I can and do occasionally ride no handed. But that is only once I get up to speed. I never start no handed riding from a stand still. And carrying two gallons in one hand, that might be really hard. About 17 pounds of weight and grabbing both of the handles in a gallon jug at once. I'm going to stick with riding with one gallon milk at a time. Carrying an attache case and a gallon of milk both in the same hand would be hard too.
  #87  
Old April 24th 21, 05:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
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Default I am that out of date

wrote:
On Friday, April 23, 2021 at 9:22:00 PM UTC-5, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 14:33:32 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

I remember the arguments of yore in this forum, about who could be
called a "real cyclist." IIRC, many posters thought the "real cyclists"
were the ones who used the posters' equipment choice.

And I say that you aren't a serious cyclist if you can't carry two
gallons of milk, or at least an attaché case.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Two gallons of milk? Now disregarding the idea that I would ever ever
ever buy two gallons of milk at once, I don't need to have a full spare
gallon when I am using the first half of the first gallon. Carrying two
gallons is hard. One gallon is easy. I can easily ride one handed and
carry the gallon milk in the other. But trying to carry two gallons at
once? I can and do occasionally ride no handed. But that is only once I
get up to speed. I never start no handed riding from a stand still. And
carrying two gallons in one hand, that might be really hard. About 17
pounds of weight and grabbing both of the handles in a gallon jug at
once. I'm going to stick with riding with one gallon milk at a time.
Carrying an attache case and a gallon of milk both in the same hand would be hard too.


With the right hardware, 2 gallons of milk is a breeze. I’ve done tours
where the bike plus four loaded panniers weighed 75 pounds.

  #88  
Old April 24th 21, 05:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 2,041
Default I am that out of date

On Friday, April 23, 2021 at 11:25:17 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
wrote:
On Friday, April 23, 2021 at 9:22:00 PM UTC-5, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 14:33:32 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

I remember the arguments of yore in this forum, about who could be
called a "real cyclist." IIRC, many posters thought the "real cyclists"
were the ones who used the posters' equipment choice.
And I say that you aren't a serious cyclist if you can't carry two
gallons of milk, or at least an attaché case.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


Two gallons of milk? Now disregarding the idea that I would ever ever
ever buy two gallons of milk at once, I don't need to have a full spare
gallon when I am using the first half of the first gallon. Carrying two
gallons is hard. One gallon is easy. I can easily ride one handed and
carry the gallon milk in the other. But trying to carry two gallons at
once? I can and do occasionally ride no handed. But that is only once I
get up to speed. I never start no handed riding from a stand still. And
carrying two gallons in one hand, that might be really hard. About 17
pounds of weight and grabbing both of the handles in a gallon jug at
once. I'm going to stick with riding with one gallon milk at a time.
Carrying an attache case and a gallon of milk both in the same hand would be hard too.

With the right hardware, 2 gallons of milk is a breeze. I’ve done tours
where the bike plus four loaded panniers weighed 75 pounds.


Thankfully I never tried to carry that much weight on my loaded tours with four panniers. If I went to the grocery store with a touring bike and panniers, I could easily carry 2 or 4 gallons of milk. But I am not sure riding a loaded touring bike with panniers would officially qualify me as a "real cyclist".
  #89  
Old April 24th 21, 01:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
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Default I am that out of date

Wolfgang Strobl wrote:
Am Thu, 22 Apr 2021 14:20:28 -0700 (PDT) schrieb
" :

On Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 7:34:46 AM UTC-5, Wolfgang Strobl wrote:
Am Wed, 21 Apr 2021 19:33:09 -0700 (PDT) schrieb
" :


But brakes have always worked
just fine for the past hundred years. I'm sure recent
improvements are better. But not much better since there
wasn't much to improve.
Well, this is why I don't really like these ****ing contests wrt.
innovations. Sometimes, progress comes in tiny steps, almost invisible.
Anyway, there was a lot to improve. Modern brakes work better when the
rim is wet and have a lot less hysteresis. I guess some of the disc
brake hype comes from people switching from old rim brakes to new disc
brakes.



Awhile ago cars had drum brakes.


Did cars ever have rim brakes?


All cars have disc brakes
now.


Not yet. Our family car still has drum brakes on the rear wheels.

It doesn't matter, cars aren't bicycles.


The old drum brakes worked.


Still do.


Some EV I believe have switched to drums vs disks as EV’s have a lot of
regenerative braking, and so the brakes are used less, and tend to fail
from lack of use, plus less drag.

I am sure disc brakes are
better. An improvement. A necessary improvement. Yes. But I
don't think it was like we went from rear end crashes on
every single drive to rear end crashes once a decade when
brakes changed from drum to disc. Disc brakes work better
than drum brakes in cars.


Older cars with drums needed care where I grew up, as the hills though not
generally long, are steep, cars since are generally not bothered, still get
the odd lorry that runs out of brakes, the road down the valley is over 10%
and few miles long and see lorries either in the sand pit, or on fire
heading for it!
Perhaps. I believe that having drum brakes in the rear may have a slight
advantage, in a car. But using a single technology has advantages to,
so switching to disc brakes does make sense.

New bicycle disc and sidepull and
cantilever brakes work better than the much, much older
centerpull and sidepull brakes on bicycles from long, long
ago. But it ain't night and day, life or death different.


On road I’d agree on the whole off road no, even the jump from cable to
hydraulic disks is quite noticeable from a hang on for dear life, to meh.

Indeed. There is far too much fear mongering around bicycles, much of it
driven by ignorance and hype.


Roger Merriman

  #90  
Old April 24th 21, 02:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
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Default I am that out of date

Wolfgang Strobl wrote:
Am Thu, 22 Apr 2021 14:26:47 -0700 (PDT) schrieb Sir Ridesalot
:

On Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 8:34:46 a.m. UTC-4, Wolfgang Strobl wrote:


Well, I used clips initially on the Peugeot, but without the strap,
sometimes called "Ladyhaken" (lady clips) around here,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_pedal#Quill
then bought Shimano M232 in 1995 and PD-M525 in '96.



I changed the brake calipers on my winter bike from
cantilever to V-brakes (also changed the brake levers)
because I found a HUGE difference when trying to stop in wet
snow and/or slush. The V-brakes would stop almost instantly
where the cantilever brakes would maybe slow the bike down a
bit at first. Those cantilever brakes were properly set up
too.


I switched from hydraulic cantilever brakes (Magura) to a cheap V-brake
on the bicycle used during winter for my commute, starting in '96, after
the Magura got stuck now and then on one side. Didn't have any problems
afterwards. Disc brakes may that good now, but they certainly weren't
then, so this wasn't an option.


I think another big advantage with disc brakes besides
their stopping power when wet or snow, is that the wheel
does not have to be perfectly true in order to prevent brake
rub. I think that's a big part of why they're so popular on
MTBs.


Perhaps. But I don't own or ride a MTB, I don't even ride on anything
that isn't paved with asphalt. On the other hand, I heared people
taling about having damaged their disks on long descents. A disk has
less heat capacity compared to a rim. Actually, disc brakes allow much
less clearance between disc and pads than rim brake - that's the very
reason for those differences, a larger ratio. So a slightly deformed
disc is already unuseable, because it gets stuck, where a rim is not.


There was a few articles all click bate stuff when road disks first came
out, when folks had did this. You certainly can cook rotors and pads but
generally requires dragging brakes, which will also cook rim brakes, are in
those early days 140mm rotors where common which probably didn’t help.

In short is technically possible but you do really have to try. On road the
loads are much less than off road, coming off the mountain nr my folks take
the road down to the village, it’s few miles at 8% switch backs etc, on
both my old MTB and the gravel bike rotors hadn’t heated up, that I could
tell, nor coming off Mt Teide 20+ miles.

But coming off the same hill down to the valley floor down one of the steep
tram, only a mile or so but 20% first section ramping up on the last bit.
That heats up rotors a treat as it’s multiple short sharp braking, as you
weave past rocks that have fallen etc, if it’s wet can hear sizzling as
water is boiled off the rotors. Still well within the brakes tolerances but
they are certainly hot!

I certainly watch the disc brake space, but IMHO there is much hype,
partially from users and about use cases different from mine. So I
remain slightly sceptical.


Roger Merriman

 




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