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Wide tires on the Fuji Touring frame



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 25th 08, 06:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Bruce W.1[_2_]
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Posts: 4
Default Wide tires on the Fuji Touring frame

For the Usenet record, I have a 2006 Fuji Touring bicycle. I put
(measured) 42mm wide tires on it, 47 mm Continental Top Contact tires if
you're interested. That's right, they're 5 mm skinnier than their specs.

They would not fit in the OEM frame. On the rear I bent the frame, made
it a little wider near the bottom bracket with a giant C-clamp.

On the front I cut out part of the front fork, using a Dremel tool, to
make more room for the fender.

It's a tight fit for sure but it works well if there is no mud on the route.

To anyone considering doing what I just did, you're crazy if you want to
put tires over 38 mm on this bike.

If a Fuji rep reads this then you should modify the frame to accommodate
wider tires. Oh and, fix your wheel building operations to prevent
broken spokes. Also, index shifting on the front derailleur sucks, use
friction shifting like the Surly LHT.

Thank you for reading this.
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  #2  
Old June 25th 08, 01:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Peter Cole[_2_]
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Posts: 4,572
Default Wide tires on the Fuji Touring frame

Bruce W.1 wrote:
For the Usenet record, I have a 2006 Fuji Touring bicycle. I put
(measured) 42mm wide tires on it, 47 mm Continental Top Contact tires if
you're interested. That's right, they're 5 mm skinnier than their specs.


That's typical. I was surprised when some 35mm Panaracers I just bought
measured exactly 35mm when mounted.


They would not fit in the OEM frame. On the rear I bent the frame, made
it a little wider near the bottom bracket with a giant C-clamp.

On the front I cut out part of the front fork, using a Dremel tool, to
make more room for the fender.

It's a tight fit for sure but it works well if there is no mud on the
route.


Sounds a little scary. I've never noticed any surplus material on a
fork. Although I've spread many a rear triangle (chain stays), widening
the clearance at the BB shell seems drastic. Dimpling the chain stays is
pretty common, but not something I'd DIY.


To anyone considering doing what I just did, you're crazy if you want to
put tires over 38 mm on this bike.


I don't see the point of going to such lengths to get s slightly wider
tire to fit. I think you just bought the wrong bike.


If a Fuji rep reads this then you should modify the frame to accommodate
wider tires.



Almost all bike manufacturers seem to be reducing clearances. My 80's
Fuji "sport tourer" easily fits 35mm (actual) tires, my 2004 Fuji
"touring bike" will not. When I'm running fenders, I particularly
dislike small clearances -- that substantially raises the risk of
picking up debris and jamming the wheel (the dark side of fenders).

Oh and, fix your wheel building operations to prevent
broken spokes.


Easily remedied after purchase by adjusting the tension and stress
relieving (see the FAQ),


Also, index shifting on the front derailleur sucks, use
friction shifting like the Surly LHT.


Setting up a front derailer is one of the most fiddly jobs, much more so
with indexed shifters. I use friction front shifting on all my road
bikes, I don't see the need for indexed. It doesn't cost much to convert.
  #3  
Old June 27th 08, 08:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 26
Default Wide tires on the Fuji Touring frame

On Jun 25, 12:09*am, "Bruce W.1" wrote:
For the Usenet record, I have a 2006 Fuji Touring bicycle. *I put
(measured) 42mm wide tires on it, 47 mm Continental Top Contact tires if
you're interested. *That's right, they're 5 mm skinnier than their specs.

They would not fit in the OEM frame. *On the rear I bent the frame, made
it a little wider near the bottom bracket with a giant C-clamp.

On the front I cut out part of the front fork, using a Dremel tool, to
make more room for the fender.

It's a tight fit for sure but it works well if there is no mud on the route.

To anyone considering doing what I just did, you're crazy if you want to
put tires over 38 mm on this bike.

If a Fuji rep reads this then you should modify the frame to accommodate
wider tires. *Oh and, fix your wheel building operations to prevent
broken spokes. *Also, index shifting on the front derailleur sucks, use
friction shifting like the Surly LHT.


Two things: first, sounds to me like you need to get your dealer (you
know, the bike shop where you bought it, unless you got it cheap/mail
order, in which case you need to do it yourself) to tweak your front
derailer. It should work well, and can be made to work well. If it
didn't, blame whomever built and (mis)adjusted your bike.

Second, a comparison of available bicycles just might indicate the
Fuji Touring was made for riding on roads. Sure, 47 tires might be
fun if they fit, but drop bars and brifters generally go with roads;
if you want a tire approaching 2" wide, perhaps you should start with
a mountain bike; you can customize if if you'd like, but you'll get a
frame that might fit your riding style better, and you can probably
start off with a less expensive bike.

Pat
 




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