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58% of California is in Heavy Drought.



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 8th 17, 09:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

But the entire state is on a flood watch.

But the riding will undoubtedly be marvelous this spring with new growth everywhere and the old dead growth knocked down by the heavy winds and water soaked root systems.

The hills will be alive with plants and animals everywhere. The bird watchers made a count a week or so ago and I'll be seeing one this coming weekend to see the results among other things.

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several other places in California. There really are no such things as "lone wolves". These are very temporary. The Alpha Male or head wolf will evict the male pups from the pack after a couple of years when they get large enough to be a possible threat to his dominance. So seeing one wolf insures that many others are near.

The rivers even close to the cities are now turning up river otters. Naturalists are sort of confused about them. They only recently (relatively) discovered that sea otters are absolutely necessary to grow the kelp forests that grow the large diversity of sea creatures and other flora that maintain the health of the coastal waters. Now since river otters had disappeared so long ago the reappearance of them gives them pause. They do not understand what part they play in the ecosystem. They are still struggling with beavers as an absolute necessity as well.

If you LOOK while you ride it is amazing the things you can see. Now is only one of these reappearing animals will control the almost uncontrollable Crow and Raven populations.
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  #2  
Old January 8th 17, 10:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.


http://www.photos-public-domain.com/...verflowing.jpg
  #3  
Old January 8th 17, 11:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 4,018
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 13:59:33 -0800 (PST), wrote:

But the entire state is on a flood watch.


The recent rains might help with reservoirs and surface water, but it
will take years to recharge the aquifier and return water table levels
to normal:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?CA

This is from 3 years ago, but is still generally valid:
"NASA Analysis: 11 Trillion Gallons to Replenish California Drought
Losses"
https://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/december/nasa-analysis-11-trillion-gallons-to-replenish-california-drought-losses/

Meanwhile, this is from only 4 days ago:
"California eyes treated wastewater for human consumption"
http://www.sonomanews.com/news/6506804-181/california-eyes-treated-wastewater-for

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since
there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their
faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several
other places in California.


There have been wolves in California for many years:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/jeffl-wolf.gif
It's just that us werewolves have a public relations problem and
prefer to maintain a low profile. Pretending that we're extinct is a
good defensive measure. Please keep your wolf siting to yourself.


--
Jeff Liebermann

150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #4  
Old January 8th 17, 11:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.


the drought began when I was thrown out.

the drought ends when I went back.

send $$$$

I was calling a wolf at Ortega Highway State Park n Rallye ...why I got the wolf to sit down in a field at 200', roll over n enthusiastically wag his tail where upon a Ranger began screaming 'ITS A DOG ITS A DOG'

ok ok its a dog.......
  #5  
Old January 8th 17, 11:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 6:22:16 PM UTC-5, DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH wrote:
the drought began when I was thrown out.

the drought ends when I went back.

send $$$$

I was calling a wolf at Ortega Highway State Park n Rallye ...why I got the wolf to sit down in a field at 200', roll over n enthusiastically wag his tail where upon a Ranger began screaming 'ITS A DOG ITS A DOG'

ok ok its a dog.......


https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/ca.php?x=1


  #6  
Old January 9th 17, 12:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 2,041
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 3:59:35 PM UTC-6, wrote:
But the entire state is on a flood watch.



You seem to be confusing droughts and floods. Floods are immediate events. Droughts are long term. Floods happen for a day or two or so. Droughts happen for years or more. Its very easy to have a flood during a drought. Droughts dry the soil so much it is unable to absorb any surface water. So a light rain which occurs once a year can result in a flood. The surface water has no where to go except through people's houses and cities. Haven't you ever watched the TV shows which show rains in the desert. They happen once a year or so and dump a foot or so of water in a few hours. All the water runs off and floods everything. But its still a desert and in a drought. Its also very possible to get heavy rains during a drought. If it rains 4 inches in one day, this does not counteract the fact the entire state is 48 inches of rain below normal. Still a drought. The 4 inches would cause a flash flood just for fun. There is also the very important consideration of frequency of waterfall. Plants and everything else need small amounts of water delivered frequently. Crops and everything else cannot grow if they receive one foot of rain in 24 hours and then nothing for the rest of the growing cycle. Even if 12 inches of rain is the correct annual waterfall, it has to be spaced out during the year for everything to do well. Rain is not like money. You can receive $1 million once a year or $2,739..73 per day all year. Doesn't really make any difference.
  #7  
Old January 9th 17, 12:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 3,345
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 3:01:47 PM UTC-8, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 13:59:33 -0800 (PST), wrote:

But the entire state is on a flood watch.


The recent rains might help with reservoirs and surface water, but it
will take years to recharge the aquifier and return water table levels
to normal:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?CA

This is from 3 years ago, but is still generally valid:
"NASA Analysis: 11 Trillion Gallons to Replenish California Drought
Losses"
https://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/december/nasa-analysis-11-trillion-gallons-to-replenish-california-drought-losses/

Meanwhile, this is from only 4 days ago:
"California eyes treated wastewater for human consumption"
http://www.sonomanews.com/news/6506804-181/california-eyes-treated-wastewater-for

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since
there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their
faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several
other places in California.


There have been wolves in California for many years:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/jeffl-wolf.gif
It's just that us werewolves have a public relations problem and
prefer to maintain a low profile. Pretending that we're extinct is a
good defensive measure. Please keep your wolf siting to yourself.


Jeff - Did you actually READ the NASA paper?
http://eprints.qut.edu.au/61707/1/JOH_2013.pdf is an analysis of the rates of recharge of aquafers and section 2 (page 9) is the true guts of the matter. The rest of the paper only tests these theories and finds them to be true.

And what is the conclusions of California? I think they are totally false. Why? Because the recharge rates they are quoting are STEADY STATE. This means that if farmers were to draw water ONLY from the aquifers as they did in the drought period it would require some 3 years of NORMAL rain to recharge.

But since water is much cheaper from water services using full reservoirs this is not a proper view.

The NASA paper makes the rather surprising statement that California's aquifers hold no more water than 1 1/2 times the total water held in California's largest reservoir. And that amount has so far been exceeded several times over.
  #8  
Old January 9th 17, 12:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 3,345
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 4:22:01 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 3:59:35 PM UTC-6, wrote:
But the entire state is on a flood watch.



You seem to be confusing droughts and floods. Floods are immediate events. Droughts are long term. Floods happen for a day or two or so. Droughts happen for years or more. Its very easy to have a flood during a drought.. Droughts dry the soil so much it is unable to absorb any surface water. So a light rain which occurs once a year can result in a flood. The surface water has no where to go except through people's houses and cities. Haven't you ever watched the TV shows which show rains in the desert. They happen once a year or so and dump a foot or so of water in a few hours. All the water runs off and floods everything. But its still a desert and in a drought. Its also very possible to get heavy rains during a drought. If it rains 4 inches in one day, this does not counteract the fact the entire state is 48 inches of rain below normal. Still a drought. The 4 inches would cause a flash flood just for fun. There is also the very important consideration of frequency of waterfall. Plants and everything else need small amounts of water delivered frequently. Crops and everything else cannot grow if they receive one foot of rain in 24 hours and then nothing for the rest of the growing cycle. Even if 12 inches of rain is the correct annual waterfall, it has to be spaced out during the year for everything to do well. Rain is not like money. You can receive $1 million once a year or $2,739.73 per day all year. Doesn't really make any difference.


russell - please give me some credit for having some idea of what I'm speaking of.

Are you aware of HOW you refill the reservoirs? Do you have any idea of the effects of the Stage 1 rains that California has been having for the last 2 months?

If you gained some $2740 a day you could invest it and done properly you could make 12% or more in addition to your million.
  #9  
Old January 9th 17, 01:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,018
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 16:29:07 -0800 (PST), wrote:

On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 3:01:47 PM UTC-8, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 13:59:33 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

But the entire state is on a flood watch.


The recent rains might help with reservoirs and surface water, but it
will take years to recharge the aquifier and return water table levels
to normal:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?CA

This is from 3 years ago, but is still generally valid:
"NASA Analysis: 11 Trillion Gallons to Replenish California Drought
Losses"
https://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/december/nasa-analysis-11-trillion-gallons-to-replenish-california-drought-losses/

Meanwhile, this is from only 4 days ago:
"California eyes treated wastewater for human consumption"
http://www.sonomanews.com/news/6506804-181/california-eyes-treated-wastewater-for

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since
there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their
faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several
other places in California.


There have been wolves in California for many years:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/jeffl-wolf.gif
It's just that us werewolves have a public relations problem and
prefer to maintain a low profile. Pretending that we're extinct is a
good defensive measure. Please keep your wolf siting to yourself.


Jeff - Did you actually READ the NASA paper?
http://eprints.qut.edu.au/61707/1/JOH_2013.pdf
is an analysis of the rates of recharge of aquafers and section 2
(page 9) is the true guts of the matter. The rest of the paper only
tests these theories and finds them to be true.


No, I skimmed it and moved on to the original calculations on
groundwater recharge rates. I am not a hydrologist, but I found the
stuff interesting. From my browser history:
https://ca.water.usgs.gov/data/drought/groundwater.html
https://earthzine.org/2016/02/23/recharging-californias-diminishing-aquifers/
http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ftpref/wntsc/H&H/NEHhydrology/ch10.pdf
I tried to estimate how many inches of rain, over some percentage of
the state, it would take to produce 11 trillion gallons (33,700,00
acre-ft) of groundwater recharge, and gave up as I was making far too
many assumptions and bad guesses.

And what is the conclusions of California? I think they are totally
false. Why? Because the recharge rates they are quoting are STEADY
STATE. This means that if farmers were to draw water ONLY from
the aquifers as they did in the drought period it would require
some 3 years of NORMAL rain to recharge.

But since water is much cheaper from water services using full
reservoirs this is not a proper view.


So, you expect farmers to dump all the water conservation equipment
and procedures and return to the bad old days of over-irrigating and
water loss by evaporation? It's possible, but probably unlikely. The
state will not slack off on water use controls until the dry well
tests show an increase in water table levels and a reduction in salt
water incursion. That will take several years.

The NASA paper makes the rather surprising statement that California's
aquifers hold no more water than 1 1/2 times the total water held
in California's largest reservoir. And that amount has so far
been exceeded several times over.


What page? I couldn't find that statement.

California's largest reservoir is Lake Shasta.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_largest_reservoirs_of_California
which holds 4,552,000 acre-ft or 5.6 km^3. I'm not sure if the
underground aquifer includes those that were recently discovered.
"Large Aquifers Discovered Under California's Drought-Stricken Central
Valley"
https://weather.com/science/environment/news/california-aquifers-discovered
"Stanford researchers show that there are about 2,700 cubic
kilometers of accessible fresh or brackish water locked in
the Central Valley’s deep underground aquifers. That’s
almost triple the 1,020 cubic kilometers of freshwater that
had been previously estimated."
That would be 482 times the largest reservoir discovered, and 182
times the pre-discovery aquifer estimate. Something is obviously
wrong here.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #10  
Old January 9th 17, 02:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

Water. Sand. Gravel
 




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