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Squeaky steering



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 10th 05, 03:49 AM
Derek Hodges
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Default Squeaky steering

yum wrote:
A newbie question,
I have an old road bike that squeaks when I turn steering.
What can I do ? Do I need to lube/replace headset bearing ?
If yes, is it easy to do myself or do I need any special tools ?
TIA


try:
http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/...t.shtml#adjust

You won't need some of the more extreme tools (headset press?) unless
you're planning to replace the whole assembly, but you will at least
need a suitable wrench and allen key.

Derek Hodges
Toronto
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  #2  
Old March 10th 05, 04:01 AM
S o r n i
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yum wrote:
A newbie question,
I have an old road bike that squeaks when I turn steering.
What can I do ? Do I need to lube/replace headset bearing ?
If yes, is it easy to do myself or do I need any special tools ?


Isolate the source first. Might just be cable housings rubbing together.
(Really!)

Then pull out the Tri-flow and drip a bit here and there.

Tighten it or lube it, words to ride (quietly) by... /B


  #3  
Old March 10th 05, 04:23 PM
Werehatrack
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On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 19:19:28 -0800, "yum" may have
said:

A newbie question,
I have an old road bike that squeaks when I turn steering.
What can I do ? Do I need to lube/replace headset bearing ?


Probably. You won't know which it is until you get it apart. On very
rare occasions, a cable will squeak when it flexes. Sometimes the
squeak may be just a dry seal or dust cap rubbing on the bearing cup.
Crunchy rumble noises are a stronger indication that the bearing is
lunched. If the bike is old and has an uncertain service history,
then taking the various bits apart and relubricating the bearings is
likely to be a good move anyway.

If yes, is it easy to do myself or do I need any special tools ?


"Easy" is a matter of skill and patience. As bike repair tasks go,
it's not the most technically challenging procedure; if you're
otherwise handy with tools, it's probably not going to be difficult to
do it right. Get a book, buy the tools for the job at hand, and learn
as you go. Both you and the bike will be the better for it.

Pointers can be found he

http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ha-i.html#headset

and

http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/..._headset.shtml

(That latter link assumes that the headset is of the older "threaded"
type, which is likely.)



--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
  #4  
Old March 10th 05, 05:01 PM
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Default

search to
DIY headset

  #5  
Old March 10th 05, 09:17 PM
Jim Smith
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Werehatrack writes:

[snip headset repair discussion]

"Easy" is a matter of skill and patience. As bike repair tasks go,
it's not the most technically challenging procedure;



Now that you mention it, as a home mechanic, I think headset
replacement IS one of the most technically challenging procedures. At
least it is the only one where I really feel like I have a chance of
breaking brand new parts. I am curious which repair tasks you find
more technically challenging?


  #6  
Old March 11th 05, 12:35 AM
Tom Sherman
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Jim Smith wrote:

Werehatrack writes:

[snip headset repair discussion]


"Easy" is a matter of skill and patience. As bike repair tasks go,
it's not the most technically challenging procedure;




Now that you mention it, as a home mechanic, I think headset
replacement IS one of the most technically challenging procedures. At
least it is the only one where I really feel like I have a chance of
breaking brand new parts. I am curious which repair tasks you find
more technically challenging?


Welding and post-welding heat treatment of aluminium alloy frames?

--
Tom Sherman - Earth

  #7  
Old March 11th 05, 12:59 AM
Werehatrack
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Default

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 15:17:01 -0600, Jim Smith
may have said:

Werehatrack writes:

[snip headset repair discussion]

"Easy" is a matter of skill and patience. As bike repair tasks go,
it's not the most technically challenging procedure;



Now that you mention it, as a home mechanic, I think headset
replacement IS one of the most technically challenging procedures. At
least it is the only one where I really feel like I have a chance of
breaking brand new parts. I am curious which repair tasks you find
more technically challenging?


Cleaning and reassembling a freewheel is more of a pain in the neck if
slightly less fiddly, and and setting up a front der that's not a
perfect match for the sprocket size can be more of a challenge.
Headsets, in my experience, are very straightforward, and with the
exception of some of the exotic zero-stack types, to me they're all
dirt simple. (Even those are probably simple, but I haven't had to
deal with them, so I'm still in the no-opinion camp except for
theoretical objections.) I'd rather do a headset swap than try to
rehab certain types of gripshift. (This may have something to do with
the fact that my collection of automotive tools has made crown races
no challenge at all.)

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
  #8  
Old March 11th 05, 01:27 AM
Tom Sherman
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Default

Werehatrack wrote:

...
Cleaning and reassembling a freewheel is more of a pain in the neck if
slightly less fiddly, and and setting up a front der that's not a
perfect match for the sprocket size can be more of a challenge....


Try setting up a front derailleur for a 62/52/39 crank. On my bike with
this crank, the vertical location of the derailleur has to be within
about 0.5-mm to keep the chain from rubbing on either the cage when in
the granny ring or hitting the large ring with the chain on either of
the two outer rings.

--
Tom Sherman - Earth

  #9  
Old March 11th 05, 03:12 AM
Jim Smith
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Default

Tom Sherman writes:

Jim Smith wrote:

Werehatrack writes:
[snip headset repair discussion]

"Easy" is a matter of skill and patience. As bike repair tasks go,
it's not the most technically challenging procedure;

Now that you mention it, as a home mechanic, I think headset
replacement IS one of the most technically challenging procedures. At
least it is the only one where I really feel like I have a chance of
breaking brand new parts. I am curious which repair tasks you find
more technically challenging?


Welding and post-welding heat treatment of aluminium alloy frames?


Yeah, that sounds like it would qualify.

  #10  
Old March 12th 05, 09:20 PM
A Muzi
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Default

On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 19:19:28 -0800, "yum" may have
said:
A newbie question,
I have an old road bike that squeaks when I turn steering.
What can I do ? Do I need to lube/replace headset bearing ?


Werehatrack wrote:
Probably. You won't know which it is until you get it apart. On very
rare occasions, a cable will squeak when it flexes. Sometimes the
squeak may be just a dry seal or dust cap rubbing on the bearing cup.
Crunchy rumble noises are a stronger indication that the bearing is
lunched. If the bike is old and has an uncertain service history,
then taking the various bits apart and relubricating the bearings is
likely to be a good move anyway.

-snip-


'Squeak while turning bars' is often a gear
cable/casing/ferrule issue.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 




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