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Inside carbon fiber frames & forks



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 17th 20, 01:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Default Inside carbon fiber frames & forks

I recently ust watched an interesting video that show the inside of carbon fiber bicycle frames and forks and how to properly cut a carbon fiber seat post.

Cutting up Expensive Carbon Bikes // Inside High-End Bicycles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZbg5hCRyvs

What I found to be quite interesting was how a wrinkle in the cloth layup or a small void can really lower the integrity of a carbon fiber frame, fork or wheel.

This guy uses a machine similar to an ultrasound machine to check for hidden flaws in carbon fiber frames, forks, wheels and/or other carbon fiber components.

Cheers
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  #2  
Old October 17th 20, 11:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
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Default Inside carbon fiber frames & forks

On Friday, October 16, 2020 at 5:40:30 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
I recently ust watched an interesting video that show the inside of carbon fiber bicycle frames and forks and how to properly cut a carbon fiber seat post.

Cutting up Expensive Carbon Bikes // Inside High-End Bicycles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZbg5hCRyvs

What I found to be quite interesting was how a wrinkle in the cloth layup or a small void can really lower the integrity of a carbon fiber frame, fork or wheel.

This guy uses a machine similar to an ultrasound machine to check for hidden flaws in carbon fiber frames, forks, wheels and/or other carbon fiber components.

Any building method that tries to build a bike without ultrasound testing and throwing the framesets with bad voids out is junk. Look uses this process but they have extremely good quality control. Pinarello discards their failures where people can scavenge them and fell them as the real thing. Trek uses mail-female molds so that they can use extreme compression. Failure due to frame failure is rare among Trek's high end lines, but the vertical cracks that run down the rear center of the down and seat tube where the halves are bonded together aren't that rare. These failures offer little danger of frame failure but you should only buy the top end Trek's NEW so that their lifetime warranty protects you. A friend has just gotten a severe BB90 failure and Trek is going to simply give him a new frame. The trouble is that although the bottom bracket is now T47 and will not fail in that manner anymore, the frame is a disk only which means that he has to buy an entirely new brake and wheel setup.
  #3  
Old October 17th 20, 11:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 5,061
Default Inside carbon fiber frames & forks

On Saturday, 17 October 2020 18:14:22 UTC-4, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, October 16, 2020 at 5:40:30 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
I recently ust watched an interesting video that show the inside of carbon fiber bicycle frames and forks and how to properly cut a carbon fiber seat post.

Cutting up Expensive Carbon Bikes // Inside High-End Bicycles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZbg5hCRyvs

What I found to be quite interesting was how a wrinkle in the cloth layup or a small void can really lower the integrity of a carbon fiber frame, fork or wheel.

This guy uses a machine similar to an ultrasound machine to check for hidden flaws in carbon fiber frames, forks, wheels and/or other carbon fiber components.

Any building method that tries to build a bike without ultrasound testing and throwing the framesets with bad voids out is junk. Look uses this process but they have extremely good quality control. Pinarello discards their failures where people can scavenge them and fell them as the real thing. Trek uses mail-female molds so that they can use extreme compression. Failure due to frame failure is rare among Trek's high end lines, but the vertical cracks that run down the rear center of the down and seat tube where the halves are bonded together aren't that rare. These failures offer little danger of frame failure but you should only buy the top end Trek's NEW so that their lifetime warranty protects you. A friend has just gotten a severe BB90 failure and Trek is going to simply give him a new frame. The trouble is that although the bottom bracket is now T47 and will not fail in that manner anymore, the frame is a disk only which means that he has to buy an entirely new brake and wheel setup.


Unfortunately you can't really tell if there's a void until after the part is made. Ditto for wrinkles inside a bicycle frame or other hollow part that utilizes an inflated bladder in the construction process and the subsequent removal of that bladder.

Cheers
  #4  
Old October 18th 20, 01:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
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Posts: 1,036
Default Inside carbon fiber frames & forks

On Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 3:52:12 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, 17 October 2020 18:14:22 UTC-4, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, October 16, 2020 at 5:40:30 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
I recently ust watched an interesting video that show the inside of carbon fiber bicycle frames and forks and how to properly cut a carbon fiber seat post.

Cutting up Expensive Carbon Bikes // Inside High-End Bicycles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZbg5hCRyvs

What I found to be quite interesting was how a wrinkle in the cloth layup or a small void can really lower the integrity of a carbon fiber frame, fork or wheel.

This guy uses a machine similar to an ultrasound machine to check for hidden flaws in carbon fiber frames, forks, wheels and/or other carbon fiber components.

Any building method that tries to build a bike without ultrasound testing and throwing the framesets with bad voids out is junk. Look uses this process but they have extremely good quality control. Pinarello discards their failures where people can scavenge them and fell them as the real thing. Trek uses mail-female molds so that they can use extreme compression. Failure due to frame failure is rare among Trek's high end lines, but the vertical cracks that run down the rear center of the down and seat tube where the halves are bonded together aren't that rare. These failures offer little danger of frame failure but you should only buy the top end Trek's NEW so that their lifetime warranty protects you. A friend has just gotten a severe BB90 failure and Trek is going to simply give him a new frame. The trouble is that although the bottom bracket is now T47 and will not fail in that manner anymore, the frame is a disk only which means that he has to buy an entirely new brake and wheel setup.

Unfortunately you can't really tell if there's a void until after the part is made. Ditto for wrinkles inside a bicycle frame or other hollow part that utilizes an inflated bladder in the construction process and the subsequent removal of that bladder.


Yes, but you can throw away (hopefully destroy it first) if it tests with voids of any kind in the important areas.
 




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