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  #1  
Old January 2nd 18, 05:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 827
Default brake arm

If we assume Torpedo 1S original parts how hard
should you pull the nut?

I heard 28-32 Nm for the dome nuts on the axle
is what Shimano specifies for their 1S hub.

Also, is it mandatory to release the nut before
pulling the wheel back to tighten the chain?
Because I know it can be done without doing so.

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  #2  
Old January 3rd 18, 02:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
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Posts: 6,807
Default brake arm

On Tue, 02 Jan 2018 06:52:29 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:
If we assume Torpedo 1S original parts how hard should you pull the
nut?

I heard 28-32 Nm for the dome nuts on the axle is what Shimano
specifies for their 1S hub.

Also, is it mandatory to release the nut before pulling the wheel back
to tighten the chain? Because I know it can be done without doing so.


I use carefully calibrated instruments to snug the nuts down just
enough: my hands and a standard open end wrench. I've never used a
torque wrench for this. Unlike a QR, threaded axles don't add
significantly to the bearing preload (because half of the force is
loaded against the threads, pulling the axle away from the hub, and half
is loaded against the dropout pushing towards the hub).

The nuts just have to be snug enough to resist chain tension pulling the
freewheel side forward. You will quickly learn to feel how much force
is needed. With a toothed washer, not a whole lot of force is really
needed with a coaster brake hub.
  #3  
Old January 3rd 18, 02:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 827
Default brake arm

Tim McNamara wrote:

I use carefully calibrated instruments to
snug the nuts down just enough: my hands and
a standard open end wrench. I've never used
a torque wrench for this.


Me neither, because I don't know how much to
pull it!

I think I could get a reading from the
Shimano 1S hub instructions folder tho as they
often put the Nm there even for nuts and screws
where you'd never have thought about it apart
from just screwing them in.

The only time I ever use a torque wrench is for
the dome nuts on the wheel axes as I know that
should be 28-32 Nm and besides it is so fun and
"scientific" to use the torque wrench

The casette on MTBs and road bikes should be 40
Nm, right? A lot!

--
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http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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