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Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 22nd 13, 03:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
EdwardDolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 538
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

"John B." wrote in message ...

On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 13:50:26 -0600, "EdwardDolan"
wrote:
[...]

John B. is the main nut case residing on this newsgroup. He thinks name calling is posting content. I don’t believe he has ever posted any content to this newsgroup. And he is a **** poor name caller to boot.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great


I see that your mania has become defensive. MAMA, the boys are calling

me names! What is next? You will lay on the floor and hold your
breath?

Facing reality and recognizing your own faults is certainly

difficult, but cheer up Eddie, recognizing your own faults and
fallacies is the first step on the road to recovery and becoming a
productive member of society.

You smarmy lagerlout git. You bloody woofter sod. Bugger off, pillock.
You grotty wanking oik artless base-court apple-john. You clouted boggish
foot-licking twit. You dankish clack-dish plonker. You gormless
crook-pated tosser. You churlish boil-brained clotpole ponce. You
cockered bum-bailey poofter. You craven dewberry ****head cockup pratting
naff. You gob-kissing gleeking flap-mouthed coxcomb. You dread-bolted
fobbing beef-witted clapper-clawed flirt-gill.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great



Ads
  #12  
Old December 22nd 13, 03:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
EdwardDolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 538
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

"John B." wrote in message ...

On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 14:14:50 -0600, "EdwardDolan"
wrote:

"Joy Beeson" wrote in message ...

I came to a sudden stop at the question about car doors because none

of the answers was one I wanted to be associated with.

When overtaking a parked car, TREAT IT AS THOUGH THE DOOR WERE ALREADY

OPEN.

It is impossible to determine that a car is unoccupied, so you should

never bet your life that a door won't swing open and knock you off the
bike.

You have identified the problem correctly, but not the solution. If you pull out from every parked car you will be interfering with traffic coming from behind. You must stay out of the lane of motor vehicle traffic unless you don’t mind vexing motorists. The only thing to do is to slow down and be watchful. Riding your bike fast in an urban setting is going to get you into trouble sooner or later.

Hey, John B., this is what is known as posting content – you dumb jackass!

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great


Content certainly but hardly either knowledgeable or informative. Like

the rest of your posting just more imaginations of a fevered brain.

Post content or get lost. What an Asshole!

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great



  #13  
Old December 22nd 13, 03:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
EdwardDolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 538
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

"Frank Krygowski" wrote in message ...

On Friday, December 20, 2013 5:22:27 PM UTC-5, Jeff Napier wrote:
I just posted a fun little bicycle safety quiz at
www.quiz50.com/bikesafetyquiz.php. I know you already know all about
bicycle safety, but this is to spread the word to those who may not. Since
the quiz is new, please let me know your thoughts, findings, etc. But,
email me directly, since I'm not monitoring this newsgroup. Thanks! - Jeff


I think if you post to a newsgroup and want to see responses, you should monitor the newsgroup.


But I don't think much of the "pretend you're invisible" advice. A cyclist who was invisible could never have right of way. He'd have to stop and wait until every car was safely past him. He'd never get anywhere.


So "Pretend you're invisible" is silly. Instead, I'd recommend riding in a visible position in the lane, using lights at night, and be alert and ready to avoid motorists who fail to see you. These have worked for me for 40+ years.


Good advice, except for that riding in the lane bit. It is best of stay out of the lane that motor vehicles are using. Sooner or latter some nut is going to run right over you and then claim that he did not see you. Frankly, if a road is not wide enough to keep me out of the lane or does not have a shoulder suitable for cycling, I avoid those particular roads. That is a far better way of insuring that you will be cycling for 40+ years.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great


  #14  
Old December 22nd 13, 03:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
EdwardDolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 538
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

"John B." wrote in message ...

On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 13:10:12 -0800 (PST), Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On Friday, December 20, 2013 5:22:27 PM UTC-5, Jeff Napier wrote:
I just posted a fun little bicycle safety quiz at
www.quiz50.com/bikesafetyquiz.php. I know you already know all about
bicycle safety, but this is to spread the word to those who may not. Since
the quiz is new, please let me know your thoughts, findings, etc. But,
email me directly, since I'm not monitoring this newsgroup. Thanks! - Jeff


I think if you post to a newsgroup and want to see responses, you should monitor the newsgroup.

But I don't think much of the "pretend you're invisible" advice. A cyclist who was invisible could never have right of way. He'd have to stop and wait until every car was safely past him. He'd never get anywhere.

So "Pretend you're invisible" is silly. Instead, I'd recommend riding in a visible position in the lane, using lights at night, and be alert and ready to avoid motorists who fail to see you. These have worked for me for 40+ years.

- Frank Krygowski


Gee, I visited the site and all I saw was an add for a $5 discount on

a fifty dollar jersey and since I never wore a $50 shirt in my life I
decided that the site was for the wealthy enthusiast and left :-)

A bicycle jersey is not exactly the same thing as a shirt, but I do agree with your main point. Cycling clothing has gotten extremely costly. In fact, bicycle shops have gotten extremely costly. I guess sometime in the past 20 years the shops have decided they can’t compete with Wal-Mart and have gone after those folks with more money than brains, of which there never seems to be a shortage.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great

  #15  
Old December 23rd 13, 12:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

On Sun, 22 Dec 2013 09:31:26 -0600, "EdwardDolan"
wrote:

"John B." wrote in message ...

Snipped


So "Pretend you're invisible" is silly. Instead, I'd recommend riding in a visible position in the lane, using lights at night, and be alert and ready to avoid motorists who fail to see you. These have worked for me for 40+ years.

- Frank Krygowski


Gee, I visited the site and all I saw was an add for a $5 discount on

a fifty dollar jersey and since I never wore a $50 shirt in my life I
decided that the site was for the wealthy enthusiast and left :-)

A bicycle jersey is not exactly the same thing as a shirt, but I do agree with your main point. Cycling clothing has gotten extremely costly. In fact, bicycle shops have gotten extremely costly. I guess sometime in the past 20 years the shops have decided they cant compete with Wal-Mart and have gone after those folks with more money than brains, of which there never seems to be a shortage.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great


shirt ~ noun
a garment worn on the upper half of the body

Jersey ~ noun common
a close-fitting pullover shirt

--
Cheers,

John B.
  #16  
Old December 23rd 13, 02:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
EdwardDolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 538
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

"John B." wrote in message ...
[...]
Gee, I visited the site and all I saw was an add for a $5 discount on

a fifty dollar jersey and since I never wore a $50 shirt in my life I
decided that the site was for the wealthy enthusiast and left :-)


Edward Dolan wrote:

A bicycle jersey is not exactly the same thing as a shirt, but I do agree with your main point. Cycling clothing has gotten extremely costly. In fact, bicycle shops have gotten extremely costly. I guess sometime in the past 20 years the shops have decided they can’t compete with Wal-Mart and have gone after those folks with more money than brains, of which there never seems to be a shortage.


shirt ~ noun

a garment worn on the upper half of the body

Jersey ~ noun common

a close-fitting pullover shirt

It is not as simple as that. Bicycle jerseys are made so as to wick body moisture away and yet keep you warm in cool weather and cool in warm weather. Very many bicycle jerseys are high tech indeed. Even so, prices have gone through the roof. The bicycle shops in my vicinity (SW Minnesota and SE South Dakota) are now strictly high end. I avoid them all like I would the plague.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great



  #17  
Old December 23rd 13, 05:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
Blackblade[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 214
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

But I don't think much of the "pretend you're invisible"
advice.* A cyclist who was invisible could never have right of way.*
He'd have to stop and wait until every car was safely past him.* He'd never
get anywhere.*

So "Pretend you're invisible" is silly.* Instead, I'd

recommend riding in a visible position in the lane, using lights at night, and
be alert and ready to avoid motorists who fail to see you.* These have
worked for me for 40+ years.

Good advice, except for that riding in the lane bit. It is
best of stay out of the lane that motor vehicles are using. Sooner or latter
some nut is going to run right over you and then claim that he did not see you.
Frankly, if a road is not wide enough to keep me out of the lane or does not
have a shoulder suitable for cycling, I avoid those particular roads. That is a
far better way of insuring that you will be cycling for 40+ years.


I think this depends on the other circumstances. There is, admittedly only anecdotal, evidence that riding as if you 'own the road' in congested cities is actually safer.

One of the biggest killers is drivers being unaware of cyclists and therefore passing too close. Taking control of a lane, albeit for a short time, may well be safer.

For example, if I am about to turn left I would take the lead position in the centre of the left hand lane. Thus, when the lights go green there are no vehicles potentially cutting me up as would be the case if I positioned myself to the far left and permitted another vehicle to come alongside. This is particularly important with lorries.
  #18  
Old December 24th 13, 12:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

On Mon, 23 Dec 2013 08:42:34 -0600, "EdwardDolan"
wrote:

"John B." wrote in message ...
[...]
Gee, I visited the site and all I saw was an add for a $5 discount on

a fifty dollar jersey and since I never wore a $50 shirt in my life I
decided that the site was for the wealthy enthusiast and left :-)


Edward Dolan wrote:

A bicycle jersey is not exactly the same thing as a shirt, but I do agree with your main point. Cycling clothing has gotten extremely costly. In fact, bicycle shops have gotten extremely costly. I guess sometime in the past 20 years the shops have decided they cant compete with Wal-Mart and have gone after those folks with more money than brains, of which there never seems to be a shortage.


shirt ~ noun

a garment worn on the upper half of the body

Jersey ~ noun common

a close-fitting pullover shirt

It is not as simple as that. Bicycle jerseys are made so as to wick body moisture away and yet keep you warm in cool weather and cool in warm weather. Very many bicycle jerseys are high tech indeed. Even so, prices have gone through the roof. The bicycle shops in my vicinity (SW Minnesota and SE South Dakota) are now strictly high end. I avoid them all like I would the plague.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great


You apparently have never seen a wool jersey. Hardly "high tech",
rather "old tech" as mankind has been weaving woolen cloth for a very
long time.

--
Cheers,

John B.
  #19  
Old December 24th 13, 03:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.soc
EdwardDolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 538
Default Humorous Bicycle Safety Quiz

"Blackblade" wrote in message ...

Frank K. wrote:

But I don't think much of the "pretend you're invisible"

advice. A cyclist who was invisible could never have right of way.
He'd have to stop and wait until every car was safely past him. He'd never
get anywhere.

So "Pretend you're invisible" is silly. Instead, I'd

recommend riding in a visible position in the lane, using lights at night, and
be alert and ready to avoid motorists who fail to see you. These have
worked for me for 40+ years.


Edward Dolan wrote:

Good advice, except for that riding in the lane bit. It is
best of stay out of the lane that motor vehicles are using. Sooner or latter
some nut is going to run right over you and then claim that he did not see you.
Frankly, if a road is not wide enough to keep me out of the lane or does not
have a shoulder suitable for cycling, I avoid those particular roads. That is a
far better way of insuring that you will be cycling for 40+ years.


I think this depends on the other circumstances. There is, admittedly only anecdotal, evidence that riding as if you 'own the road' in congested cities is actually safer.


One of the biggest killers is drivers being unaware of cyclists and therefore passing too close. Taking control of a lane, albeit for a short time, may well be safer.


For example, if I am about to turn left I would take the lead position in the centre of the left hand lane. Thus, when the lights go green there are no vehicles potentially cutting me up as would be the case if I positioned myself to the far left and permitted another vehicle to come alongside. This is particularly important with lorries.


I think it boils down to how big a risk taker are you? How much do you trust motorists to watch out for you? My level of trust is minimal due to very many personal experiences.

Your number one consideration while cycling on city streets should be safety, not getting somewhere fast. Traffic is sometimes so ****ed up I will take to the sidewalks to get out of it.

Ed Dolan the Great
aka
Saint Edward the Great


 




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