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bike shedding most boring trend



 
 
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  #31  
Old January 28th 18, 07:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,044
Default bike shedding most boring trend

On 1/28/2018 10:34 AM, Ned Mantei wrote:
On 28-01-18 06:35, Frank Krygowski wrote:

And I agree with the concept. As I've mentioned before, we were
staying with (new) friends in Zurich, and they took us on a walking
tour of the city. At that time, they had just passed a "strict
liability" law like you describe. Our friends told us it absolutely
transformed the experience of walking (and IIRC bicycling) around the
city.

Isn't one of our newer posters from there? Any comment?


That could be me...

I've been reading the local newspaper (Tages Anzeiger) everyday for
decades, and I don't remember ever seeing something like this. Maybe it
was a long time ago?


We were there in 2007. We were told the law was very new then.

In any event, I generally feel safe riding in
Zurich. The city hasĀ* helped, for example by sometimes reserving the
sidewalk on one side of a street just for bicycles, by allowing bicycles
on small roads where otherwise non-resident traffic is forbidden, and by
establishing sensible bike lanes (wide enough to avoid the door zone).


We were there for two rainy days and did not ride a lot. I do remember
wayfinding signs (for example, leading me to the train station via quiet
streets and some connector paths). I don't think I ever rode a sidewalk
path. Not all connector paths were wonderfully maintained, but they did
provide a pretty peaceful route.

Besides this, over the years I've worked out my own ways to get through
the city, mostly avoiding heavy traffic.


I do the same here. And I acknowledge that that's probably easier in
older cities than in new ones. Big newer development, like in the
southern U.S. (Charlotte NC, Jacksonville FL) tends to be designed
around "stroads" sprouting cul-de-sac "mushroom" housing areas, and huge
shopping areas designed only for car access. Older areas retain more
parallel street choices, and even some cut-throughs that are
inaccessible to cars.

I also signal for turns, stop
for red lights, and generally try to behave in a predictable way.


Me too.

Another factor is that there are enough people on bicycles here that
drivers are used to seeing them. Years ago I went for a ride while
visiting Cincinnati, and had the impression that a lot of drivers had
never encountered a bicycle before. That seemed scary.


I'm certain that having more cyclists helps. Unfortunately, in the U.S.
there is a strong cabal of "bicycle advocates" who seem to think that
any facility that increases cycling count is fine. That's despite
dangers in some designs. And of course, the novices lured by those
designs are the ones least likely to recognize the dangers.

--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #32  
Old January 29th 18, 02:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default bike shedding most boring trend

On Sun, 28 Jan 2018 14:47:32 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 1/28/2018 10:34 AM, Ned Mantei wrote:
On 28-01-18 06:35, Frank Krygowski wrote:

And I agree with the concept. As I've mentioned before, we were
staying with (new) friends in Zurich, and they took us on a walking
tour of the city. At that time, they had just passed a "strict
liability" law like you describe. Our friends told us it absolutely
transformed the experience of walking (and IIRC bicycling) around the
city.

Isn't one of our newer posters from there? Any comment?


That could be me...

I've been reading the local newspaper (Tages Anzeiger) everyday for
decades, and I don't remember ever seeing something like this. Maybe it
was a long time ago?


We were there in 2007. We were told the law was very new then.

In any event, I generally feel safe riding in
Zurich. The city has* helped, for example by sometimes reserving the
sidewalk on one side of a street just for bicycles, by allowing bicycles
on small roads where otherwise non-resident traffic is forbidden, and by
establishing sensible bike lanes (wide enough to avoid the door zone).


We were there for two rainy days and did not ride a lot. I do remember
wayfinding signs (for example, leading me to the train station via quiet
streets and some connector paths). I don't think I ever rode a sidewalk
path. Not all connector paths were wonderfully maintained, but they did
provide a pretty peaceful route.

Besides this, over the years I've worked out my own ways to get through
the city, mostly avoiding heavy traffic.


I do the same here. And I acknowledge that that's probably easier in
older cities than in new ones. Big newer development, like in the
southern U.S. (Charlotte NC, Jacksonville FL) tends to be designed
around "stroads" sprouting cul-de-sac "mushroom" housing areas, and huge
shopping areas designed only for car access. Older areas retain more
parallel street choices, and even some cut-throughs that are
inaccessible to cars.

I also signal for turns, stop
for red lights, and generally try to behave in a predictable way.


Me too.

Another factor is that there are enough people on bicycles here that
drivers are used to seeing them. Years ago I went for a ride while
visiting Cincinnati, and had the impression that a lot of drivers had
never encountered a bicycle before. That seemed scary.


I'm certain that having more cyclists helps. Unfortunately, in the U.S.
there is a strong cabal of "bicycle advocates" who seem to think that
any facility that increases cycling count is fine. That's despite
dangers in some designs. And of course, the novices lured by those
designs are the ones least likely to recognize the dangers.


There is a subject here that seems to be totally ignored - the
cyclist.

In a number of formal studies, the CHP study in L.A. country comes
strongly to mind, over half of the accidents, where blame could be
assigned, were the fault of the cyclist. In both New York and San
Francisco autopsies performed on cyclists killed in highway accidents
shows a blood alcohol content in excess of the legal maximum on nearly
half the bodies.

Will all the publicly constructed MUPS in the world protect a drunken
law breaker?

And if not, how can numbers of crashes be reduced?

https://www.planetizen.com/node/8182...-hate-cyclists

https://www.psychologicalscience.org...ith-bikes.html

https://tinyurl.com/y9ccdmzy

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248656/
http://www.pedbikeinfo.org/data/factsheet_crash.cfm
https://helmets.org/alcohol.htm

https://tinyurl.com/y9v4xf8k
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #33  
Old January 30th 18, 04:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 906
Default bike shedding most boring trend

AMuzi wrote:

What about a bright blue/yellow Svensk flag
colored bicycle? Oughta be safe right?


There is a famous MTB from the 90s in those
exact colors! It was in a bike mag recently but
I can't find it and I don't remember the brand
and probably there were many such or similar
bikes. Anyway the guy who bought it said he
thought it looked so good he didn't plan to
ride it but instead hang it from the wall as
a piece of art for everyone to admire.
While I don't think those exact colors look
that good it is indeed much better than a bike
entirely in black or in just one frame/fork
color, and everything else in black or gray.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #34  
Old January 30th 18, 07:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,224
Default bike shedding most boring trend

On Friday, January 26, 2018 at 8:04:55 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/26/2018 9:28 AM, Emanuel Berg wrote:

Having everything black, e.g. equipment (very
common for computer stuff for example) is also
detrimental as 1) you get depressed just by
looking at it, and 2) it is (more) difficult to
find the thing you'd like if everything is the
same color.


I'll admit, there's some frustration in having a black suitcase
containing a black toiletry kit, a black camera case, a black case for
an eReader, etc.

But somehow I'm always able to find my bicycles. And the black bike
makes me smile as often as the others.


My red racing bike is super-fast. The black commuter bike not so much, but it does have bright orange lettering that adds a little speed. This color scheme (with different parts): https://4d0850cecf2c5ce919d5-17b283a....jpg?bg=6D6F76

It was a free warranty replacement, so beggars can't be choosers. It's also caked in dirt from the daily rain commute, so the letters are not so garish. It also has white on the back of the seat stays which adds a tiny bit of visibility at night.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #35  
Old January 30th 18, 08:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 906
Default bike shedding most boring trend

jbeattie wrote:

My red racing bike is super-fast.


Well, speed isn't everything. Add some brown,
cyan, pink, and green to make it stiff, aero,
light, and comfortable as well.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #36  
Old February 2nd 18, 08:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 906
Default bike shedding most boring trend

Another bike that makes you want to play in
that background green field like a kid or
deranged senior, anything rather than to take
it for a ride.

The Canyon Aeroad SLX Disc 8.0:

http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/bike/canyon-aeroad.jpg

When Bruce Wayne made his Batmobile look that
way, he intended it to sneak up on people in
the dark and suddenly strike fear into their
hearts and minds before he went on with the
charge. Perhaps that is what Canyon think you
should do with it as well?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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