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western Provence in France



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 30th 06, 05:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.rides
Ken Roberts
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 241
Default western Provence in France

Sharon and I had a great time doing rides around Aix and Marseille in
southern France. Late November is not the perfect time to ride there, but
the American Thanksgiving holiday allowed us to get a full week for the cost
of 3 vacation days. Selected photos at
http://www.roberts-1.com/t/b06/p/k

Felt like the most fun region for riding which Sharon + I have found so far.
We're already making specific plans for going back: where to make our base,
what new routes to try, what routes to do again perhaps with new variations.

What's so great:
* Variety of riding: from flat in the Camargue to gentle further north in
the Rhone valley, to villages on moderate-size hilltops, to the giant climb
of Mont Ventoux.
* Variety from big seaside views, to inland vineyards and stone houses, to
remote forests, and to farm animals beside the road, pleasant valley cities
with large car-free zones.
* Lots of big views on roads that traverse hillsides at a moderate grade.
* Hilltop towns are not so high and steep as some other regions (e.g. the
"T" place). Climbs to cross passes are shorter than in some other regions.
* For visiting in late autumn, tends to have more sunshine and less rain
than places further north. (but it can get windy)
* Easy transportation access to other great riding regions: A7 north to
Auvergne, A8 east to Cote d'Azur and Alpes Maritimes, ferry from Marseille
or Toulon to the island of Corsica / Corse.

non-riding advantages:
* some great hiking in the Calanques, Grand Canyon du Verdon, etc.
* pleasant walking + shopping in the cities.
* great wine (Cotes du Rhone, etc.) and great food.

Highlights for us on this trip
* Cassis tri-adventure -- hike, swim, bike along the Mediterranean coast,
including big sea views riding the Route des Cretes
road to la Ciotat.
* Grand Canyon du Verdon: largest canyon in Europe, two corniche roads
hanging the edges, big hiking adventure down inside.
* hilltop villages in the Vaucluse between Avignon + Apt.
* loop thru toothy Alpilles ridge and les Baux, east of Arles.
* Camargues special atmosphere out on the unpaved flat dikes thru big lakes
and marshes, with sightings of birds and horses and bulls along the paved
flat roads.
* Mont Ventoux for its special atmosphere of steep roads with giant
unhindered views.
* Aix-en-Provence city on street market day.

We also rode around Mt Ste Victoire (famously painted by Cezanne), over the
Pont du Gard bridge from Roman times, and along the Gorges de l'Ardeche
(nowhere in the same league as G.C.Verdon, we called it "faux corniche").

We did this trip in "normal Euro" style, putting our bike on a car each day
and driving to the start of our chosen ride. Of course there's been lots of
enthusiastic reports on Provence from "bicycle only" style tours, and also
from expensively guided van-supported tours -- easy to find with web
searches. The very helpful Cycling France guidebook published by Lonely
Planet has detailed routes and descriptions for three or four multi-day
cycle tours in this region.

Ken


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  #2  
Old December 1st 06, 02:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides
steephill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default western Provence in France

Ken,

My wife and I also did a "normal Euro" style trip to the Provence as
part of our summer in Southern France this year. Other than Mt Ventoux,
it doesn't look like we overlapped much. I've would liked to hit the
Mediterranean coast as you did. We were going to cycle the Gorges de
l'Ardeche but the area was just nuts in August... sounds like we didn't
miss much. The Provence is an interesting place... there is some much
variation in scenery and culture in Southern France.

thanks for sharing,
Steve
www.steephill.tv bike travelogue

On Nov 30, 8:11 am, "Ken Roberts"
wrote:
Sharon and I had a great time doing rides around Aix and Marseille in
southern France. Late November is not the perfect time to ride there, but
the American Thanksgiving holiday allowed us to get a full week for the cost
of 3 vacation days. Selected photos athttp://www.roberts-1.com/t/b06/p/k

Felt like the most fun region for riding which Sharon + I have found so far.
We're already making specific plans for going back: where to make our base,
what new routes to try, what routes to do again perhaps with new variations.

What's so great:
* Variety of riding: from flat in the Camargue to gentle further north in
the Rhone valley, to villages on moderate-size hilltops, to the giant climb
of Mont Ventoux.
* Variety from big seaside views, to inland vineyards and stone houses, to
remote forests, and to farm animals beside the road, pleasant valley cities
with large car-free zones.
* Lots of big views on roads that traverse hillsides at a moderate grade.
* Hilltop towns are not so high and steep as some other regions (e.g. the
"T" place). Climbs to cross passes are shorter than in some other regions.
* For visiting in late autumn, tends to have more sunshine and less rain
than places further north. (but it can get windy)
* Easy transportation access to other great riding regions: A7 north to
Auvergne, A8 east to Cote d'Azur and Alpes Maritimes, ferry from Marseille
or Toulon to the island of Corsica / Corse.

non-riding advantages:
* some great hiking in the Calanques, Grand Canyon du Verdon, etc.
* pleasant walking + shopping in the cities.
* great wine (Cotes du Rhone, etc.) and great food.

Highlights for us on this trip
* Cassis tri-adventure -- hike, swim, bike along the Mediterranean coast,
including big sea views riding the Route des Cretes
road to la Ciotat.
* Grand Canyon du Verdon: largest canyon in Europe, two corniche roads
hanging the edges, big hiking adventure down inside.
* hilltop villages in the Vaucluse between Avignon + Apt.
* loop thru toothy Alpilles ridge and les Baux, east of Arles.
* Camargues special atmosphere out on the unpaved flat dikes thru big lakes
and marshes, with sightings of birds and horses and bulls along the paved
flat roads.
* Mont Ventoux for its special atmosphere of steep roads with giant
unhindered views.
* Aix-en-Provence city on street market day.

We also rode around Mt Ste Victoire (famously painted by Cezanne), over the
Pont du Gard bridge from Roman times, and along the Gorges de l'Ardeche
(nowhere in the same league as G.C.Verdon, we called it "faux corniche").

We did this trip in "normal Euro" style, putting our bike on a car each day
and driving to the start of our chosen ride. Of course there's been lots of
enthusiastic reports on Provence from "bicycle only" style tours, and also
from expensively guided van-supported tours -- easy to find with web
searches. The very helpful Cycling France guidebook published by Lonely
Planet has detailed routes and descriptions for three or four multi-day
cycle tours in this region.

Ken


  #3  
Old December 1st 06, 10:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Edward Dolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,212
Default western Provence in France


"Ken Roberts" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Sharon and I had a great time doing rides around Aix and Marseille in
southern France. Late November is not the perfect time to ride there, but
the American Thanksgiving holiday allowed us to get a full week for the
cost of 3 vacation days. Selected photos at
http://www.roberts-1.com/t/b06/p/k

Felt like the most fun region for riding which Sharon + I have found so
far. We're already making specific plans for going back: where to make our
base, what new routes to try, what routes to do again perhaps with new
variations.

What's so great:
* Variety of riding: from flat in the Camargue to gentle further north in
the Rhone valley, to villages on moderate-size hilltops, to the giant
climb
of Mont Ventoux.
* Variety from big seaside views, to inland vineyards and stone houses, to
remote forests, and to farm animals beside the road, pleasant valley
cities with large car-free zones.
* Lots of big views on roads that traverse hillsides at a moderate grade.
* Hilltop towns are not so high and steep as some other regions (e.g. the
"T" place). Climbs to cross passes are shorter than in some other regions.
* For visiting in late autumn, tends to have more sunshine and less rain
than places further north. (but it can get windy)
* Easy transportation access to other great riding regions: A7 north to
Auvergne, A8 east to Cote d'Azur and Alpes Maritimes, ferry from Marseille
or Toulon to the island of Corsica / Corse.

non-riding advantages:
* some great hiking in the Calanques, Grand Canyon du Verdon, etc.
* pleasant walking + shopping in the cities.
* great wine (Cotes du Rhone, etc.) and great food.

Highlights for us on this trip
* Cassis tri-adventure -- hike, swim, bike along the Mediterranean coast,
including big sea views riding the Route des Cretes
road to la Ciotat.
* Grand Canyon du Verdon: largest canyon in Europe, two corniche roads
hanging the edges, big hiking adventure down inside.
* hilltop villages in the Vaucluse between Avignon + Apt.
* loop thru toothy Alpilles ridge and les Baux, east of Arles.
* Camargues special atmosphere out on the unpaved flat dikes thru big
lakes
and marshes, with sightings of birds and horses and bulls along the paved
flat roads.
* Mont Ventoux for its special atmosphere of steep roads with giant
unhindered views.
* Aix-en-Provence city on street market day.

We also rode around Mt Ste Victoire (famously painted by Cezanne), over
the Pont du Gard bridge from Roman times, and along the Gorges de
l'Ardeche (nowhere in the same league as G.C.Verdon, we called it "faux
corniche").

We did this trip in "normal Euro" style, putting our bike on a car each
day and driving to the start of our chosen ride. Of course there's been
lots of enthusiastic reports on Provence from "bicycle only" style tours,
and also from expensively guided van-supported tours -- easy to find with
web searches. The very helpful Cycling France guidebook published by
Lonely Planet has detailed routes and descriptions for three or four
multi-day cycle tours in this region.


Are Ken and Sharon Roberts crazy? Or have they spent so much time in France
that they can afford to waste it cycling there? I do not think the average
American will ever want to do what they are doing. Most of us are not so
jaded and have so much time available that we can afford to spend it cycling
about la belle France. Nay, when we go to France we want to make good use of
our limited resources. Cycling about France is just about the dumbest thing
I have ever heard (unless you are French of course).

I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French since I
consider them all to be traitors to Western Civilization. Only such as Tom
Sherman of ARBR would ever want to go to France and actually converse with
them since he is like them in his political views.

I will only bike in my own country and it would never even occur to me to do
it in a foreign country. What a waste! Do they not have buses and trains to
take you where you want to go?

Regards,

Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
aka
Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota


  #4  
Old December 1st 06, 11:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.rides,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
James Prine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default western Provence in France

Edward Dolan wrote:
I do not think the average American will ever want to do what they are doing.


Of course not. The "average American" has roots growing out of his ass
from sitting in front of a television set watching idiotic sports while
the Missus brings him a never-ending supply of beer and snacks.

Cycling about France is just about the dumbest thing
I have ever heard (unless you are French of course).


Cycling in most any European country is a helluva lot of fun and you
get to see the countryside and experience the culture a lot more
intimately than you ever would on a canned holiday. If nothing else,
one's language skills are sharpened considerably when cycling alone out
in the countryside. Besides, "Si vous ne l'utilisez pas, vous le
perdez!"

I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French since I
consider them all to be traitors to Western Civilization. Only such as Tom
Sherman of ARBR would ever want to go to France and actually converse with
them since he is like them in his political views.


LOL....some of the French are a helluva lot more pro-American than the
voters of Massachusetts and California g.

Best,

James

  #5  
Old December 2nd 06, 01:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides
Ken Roberts
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 241
Default western Provence in France

Edward Dolan wrote
I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French


Seems like whenever we meet a local French resident, we tell them early in
the conversation that we're from America, and they're very nice to us. Some
of them give us food or invite us to a meal. Lots of them want to tell us
about how they or a close relative have visited America -- or even lived in
America for a while.

I do not think the average American will ever want to do what they are
doing.


For sure. But actually Sharon and I have done more of our riding in the
United States -- and more of our writing about it like on
www.roberts-1.com/bikehudson -- and I don't think the average American wants
to do what we're doing in America either.

Do they not have buses and trains to take you where you want to go?


Probably, but we are authentic representatives of American culture. When we
want to get somewhere in Europe normally we drive a car. We ride our
bicycle just to have fun -- making a loop back to where we started: not
getting anywhere.

Ken


  #6  
Old December 2nd 06, 06:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides
Ken Roberts
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 241
Default western Provence in France

Steve wrote
it doesn't look like we overlapped much.


Good -- then I'll learn more from your upcoming(?) stories and photos.

I've would liked to hit the Mediterranean coast as you did.


Actually the Cassis to Ciotat road is kinda short. Further east there's a
longer loop I'd gladly ride again with the Esterel mountains and Esterel sea
corniche road (and even further are the famous Nice corniche roads). Closer
to Aix and Marseille: between Ciotat and the Esterel is another potential
mountain - and -sea loop which we didn't get the chance to ride: the massif
des Maurea and the Corniche des Maures, between le Lavandou and St Tropez,
and inland near Grimaud and Col de Babaou. If anyone's got some tips on
that, I'd be grateful.

Gorges de l'Ardeche


We only rode the eastern section of the D290 from St Martin up to the D490,
and felt it was about the most boring riding we'd done together in Europe.
There's a few places where you can stop and get off and go look for the view
down into the canyon, but the road itself is not what I would call a
"corniche". Maybe the road gets spectacular further west of the D490 with
some views of the Pont d'Arc. A few days later we went to Grand Canyon du
Verdon and I kept saying, "Now this is a real corniche road". I have a
feeling that the Gorge de l'Ardeche is more justly famous as a raft trip.
(and actually the G.C. Verdon is even more spectacular hiking down inside).

Ken


  #7  
Old December 4th 06, 06:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Edward Dolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,212
Default western Provence in France


"James Prine" wrote in message
oups.com...
Edward Dolan wrote:
I do not think the average American will ever want to do what they are
doing.


Of course not. The "average American" has roots growing out of his ass
from sitting in front of a television set watching idiotic sports while
the Missus brings him a never-ending supply of beer and snacks.


By average American I mean the average educated and highly cultured American
such as myself, not the dumb asses you are thinking of.

Cycling about France is just about the dumbest thing
I have ever heard (unless you are French of course).


Cycling in most any European country is a helluva lot of fun and you
get to see the countryside and experience the culture a lot more
intimately than you ever would on a canned holiday. If nothing else,
one's language skills are sharpened considerably when cycling alone out
in the countryside. Besides, "Si vous ne l'utilisez pas, vous le
perdez!"


Nope, sorry, it is an inefficient way to experience a foreign land. You are
expending time and energy just cycling when that time and energy could be
put to a far more productive use. Spin your wheels at home, not abroad. By
the way, I also do not like canned holidays unless I just want to see some
highlights.

I think if you had a car in France, that would have been a good enough way
to take in the country. Leave the bikes at home.

I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French since I
consider them all to be traitors to Western Civilization. Only such as
Tom
Sherman of ARBR would ever want to go to France and actually converse
with
them since he is like them in his political views.


LOL....some of the French are a helluva lot more pro-American than the
voters of Massachusetts and California g.


That could possibly be true. Minnesotans are just about as stupid (liberal
and treasonous) as are the denizens of Massachusetts and California.

Regards,

Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
aka
Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota


  #8  
Old December 4th 06, 07:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Edward Dolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,212
Default western Provence in France


"Ken Roberts" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Edward Dolan wrote
I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French


Seems like whenever we meet a local French resident, we tell them early in
the conversation that we're from America, and they're very nice to us.
Some
of them give us food or invite us to a meal. Lots of them want to tell us
about how they or a close relative have visited America -- or even lived
in
America for a while.


Sure, they are nice to your face, but they will stab you in the back when
you least expect it. The French are swine, always have been and always will
be. That is why I recommend that Tom Sherman of ARBR join them at his
earliest convenience. He will feel right at home there in the pig trough.

I do not think the average American will ever want to do what they are
doing.


For sure. But actually Sharon and I have done more of our riding in the
United States -- and more of our writing about it like on
www.roberts-1.com/bikehudson -- and I don't think the average American
wants to do what we're doing in America either.

Do they not have buses and trains to take you where you want to go?


Probably, but we are authentic representatives of American culture. When
we
want to get somewhere in Europe normally we drive a car. We ride our
bicycle just to have fun -- making a loop back to where we started: not
getting anywhere.


It is a waste of time and energy to ride your bike for fun while in a
foreign land. That is something you can do here. Also, trust me on this,
your wife is only doing the cycling thing to please you. She would much
rather tour France in a civilized manner. Why don't you be less selfish and
try to please her for a change.

Every square inch of Europe is so crowed with things to see that I cannot
believe any Americans would waste their time cycling there. You are surely
jaded or perhaps just incurious about the wealth of what there is to see in
Europe. Play at home; tour abroad. They are not one and the same thing.

When I last toured Europe for a period of many months, I did not bother to
converse with any Europeans whatsoever. Hells Bells, they are even stupider
than Americans. Nay, I concentrated solely on the history and the ruins.
Europe is just chock full of ruins. It is the only reason to go there in my
not so humble opinion.

From my perspective, Rome is perfect as it has the most ruins. The main
thing however is never to speak to a living European while you are there. If
you do that, you will come back hating the place. My brother, who only
mildly disliked the French, spent a week in Paris and actually wanted to get
friendly with them. He came back hating all the French with a passion.
However, he still likes French painting. The moral of this story is never
confuse culture with the people who produce it.

Regards,

Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
aka
Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota


  #9  
Old December 10th 06, 04:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.rides,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
francois.girard5
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default western Provence in France


"Edward Dolan" a écrit dans le message de news:
...

"Ken Roberts" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Edward Dolan wrote
I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French


Seems like whenever we meet a local French resident, we tell them early
in
the conversation that we're from America, and they're very nice to us.
Some
of them give us food or invite us to a meal. Lots of them want to tell us
about how they or a close relative have visited America -- or even lived
in
America for a while.


Sure, they are nice to your face, but they will stab you in the back when
you least expect it. The French are swine, always have been and always
will be. That is why I recommend that Tom Sherman of ARBR join them at his
earliest convenience. He will feel right at home there in the pig trough.

I do not think the average American will ever want to do what they are
doing.


For sure. But actually Sharon and I have done more of our riding in the
United States -- and more of our writing about it like on
www.roberts-1.com/bikehudson -- and I don't think the average American
wants to do what we're doing in America either.

Do they not have buses and trains to take you where you want to go?


Probably, but we are authentic representatives of American culture. When
we
want to get somewhere in Europe normally we drive a car. We ride our
bicycle just to have fun -- making a loop back to where we started: not
getting anywhere.


It is a waste of time and energy to ride your bike for fun while in a
foreign land. That is something you can do here. Also, trust me on this,
your wife is only doing the cycling thing to please you. She would much
rather tour France in a civilized manner. Why don't you be less selfish
and try to please her for a change.

Every square inch of Europe is so crowed with things to see that I cannot
believe any Americans would waste their time cycling there. You are surely
jaded or perhaps just incurious about the wealth of what there is to see
in Europe. Play at home; tour abroad. They are not one and the same thing.

When I last toured Europe for a period of many months, I did not bother to
converse with any Europeans whatsoever. Hells Bells, they are even
stupider than Americans. Nay, I concentrated solely on the history and the
ruins. Europe is just chock full of ruins. It is the only reason to go
there in my not so humble opinion.

From my perspective, Rome is perfect as it has the most ruins. The main
thing however is never to speak to a living European while you are there.
If you do that, you will come back hating the place. My brother, who only
mildly disliked the French, spent a week in Paris and actually wanted to
get friendly with them. He came back hating all the French with a passion.
However, he still likes French painting. The moral of this story is never
confuse culture with the people who produce it.

Regards,


O.K. i agree, we have nothing to do with stupid jingos, self conceited,
aggressive and fat assed people like you
W.P.

Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
aka
Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota




  #10  
Old December 13th 06, 04:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.rides,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
Edward Dolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,212
Default western Provence in France


"francois.girard5" wrote in message
...

"Edward Dolan" a écrit dans le message de news:
...

"Ken Roberts" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Edward Dolan wrote
I myself would never stoop to converse with any of the French

Seems like whenever we meet a local French resident, we tell them early
in
the conversation that we're from America, and they're very nice to us.
Some
of them give us food or invite us to a meal. Lots of them want to tell
us
about how they or a close relative have visited America -- or even lived
in
America for a while.


Sure, they are nice to your face, but they will stab you in the back when
you least expect it. The French are swine, always have been and always
will be. That is why I recommend that Tom Sherman of ARBR join them at
his earliest convenience. He will feel right at home there in the pig
trough.

I do not think the average American will ever want to do what they are
doing.

For sure. But actually Sharon and I have done more of our riding in the
United States -- and more of our writing about it like on
www.roberts-1.com/bikehudson -- and I don't think the average American
wants to do what we're doing in America either.

Do they not have buses and trains to take you where you want to go?

Probably, but we are authentic representatives of American culture. When
we
want to get somewhere in Europe normally we drive a car. We ride our
bicycle just to have fun -- making a loop back to where we started: not
getting anywhere.


It is a waste of time and energy to ride your bike for fun while in a
foreign land. That is something you can do here. Also, trust me on this,
your wife is only doing the cycling thing to please you. She would much
rather tour France in a civilized manner. Why don't you be less selfish
and try to please her for a change.

Every square inch of Europe is so crowed with things to see that I cannot
believe any Americans would waste their time cycling there. You are
surely jaded or perhaps just incurious about the wealth of what there is
to see in Europe. Play at home; tour abroad. They are not one and the
same thing.

When I last toured Europe for a period of many months, I did not bother
to converse with any Europeans whatsoever. Hells Bells, they are even
stupider than Americans. Nay, I concentrated solely on the history and
the ruins. Europe is just chock full of ruins. It is the only reason to
go there in my not so humble opinion.

From my perspective, Rome is perfect as it has the most ruins. The main
thing however is never to speak to a living European while you are there.
If you do that, you will come back hating the place. My brother, who only
mildly disliked the French, spent a week in Paris and actually wanted to
get friendly with them. He came back hating all the French with a
passion. However, he still likes French painting. The moral of this story
is never confuse culture with the people who produce it.

Regards,


O.K. i agree, we have nothing to do with stupid jingos, self conceited,
aggressive and fat assed people like you
W.P.


The only ones more stupid than the French are those who choose to live there
even though not born there. The above ****ed-up message by W.P. was
obviously written by an Englishman or an American living abroad in la belle
France.

But France is being overrun by Muslims from North Africa and the Middle East
and so we will not have to suffer the insufferable French much longer.
France, ever the land of treasonous liberals who will not defend Western
Civilization against its enemies, may it perish from the earth!

Regards,

Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
aka
Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota


 




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