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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #481  
Old August 8th 16, 12:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
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Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Water

On Sun, 7 Aug 2016 10:37:58 -0000 (UTC), Duane wrote:

Joy Beeson wrote:

Never carry an empty bottle away from a source of drinking water.


+100000

An addendum, especially for us aging cyclists would be to never pass up the
use of the facilities if you're already stopped there.


I would even add, "stop occasionally before it is an emergency" :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

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  #482  
Old August 14th 16, 02:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,009
Default AG: Signs of Dehydration



The first sign of dehydration is loss of judgment. By definition, you
are not going to notice that, but if you do something that you
consider particularly clever, you might want to pause and think.


You might be dehydrated if:

you've been riding for four or more hours and you aren't anxiously
evaluating the opacity of every bush.

you keep applying and re-applying your lip balm.

you feel tired and you haven't been working all that hard.

your urine is darker than usual.

your stomach feels a little off.

you get a muscle cramp.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.





  #483  
Old August 15th 16, 02:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
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Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Signs of Dehydration

On Sat, 13 Aug 2016 22:22:18 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:



The first sign of dehydration is loss of judgment. By definition, you
are not going to notice that, but if you do something that you
consider particularly clever, you might want to pause and think.


You might be dehydrated if:

you've been riding for four or more hours and you aren't anxiously
evaluating the opacity of every bush.

you keep applying and re-applying your lip balm.

you feel tired and you haven't been working all that hard.

your urine is darker than usual.

your stomach feels a little off.

you get a muscle cramp.


Your post inspired me to do a little research on "dehydration" and it
turns out that related to exercise it is a fairly complex subject.
Bicyclists apparently drink all the time while the top level
marathoners drink relatively little and typically lose 7 to 8 pounds
during a race, about 3 - 4 liters of water, or 6 to 8 bicycle bottles.

In addition when one begins to lose water content one doesn't
immediately become thirsty and after water is imbibed it takes as much
as 20 minutes before your body has absorbed it into the body's fluid
systems and adding complexity is that chemicals in the water determine
how quickly it will be absorbed. GaterAid was not originally designed
as a "sports drink" but as a liquid that the body absorbed faster than
pure water.

Given that the human body has a sort of sell leveling fluid system the
logical thing to do is to drink as much as possible, as often as
possible, as the body's automatic volume control will eliminate any
surplus :-)

It might be of interest that a male body weight is largely, 60% water
while a female is only 55% water so theoretically a woman might be
more susceptible to dehydration than a man.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #484  
Old August 15th 16, 03:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,471
Default AG: Signs of Dehydration

On 8/14/2016 9:56 PM, John B. wrote:


Your post inspired me to do a little research on "dehydration" and it
turns out that related to exercise it is a fairly complex subject.
Bicyclists apparently drink all the time while the top level
marathoners drink relatively little and typically lose 7 to 8 pounds
during a race, about 3 - 4 liters of water, or 6 to 8 bicycle bottles.


I'll have to ask the family marathoner about that.


In addition when one begins to lose water content one doesn't
immediately become thirsty and after water is imbibed it takes as much
as 20 minutes before your body has absorbed it into the body's fluid
systems and adding complexity is that chemicals in the water determine
how quickly it will be absorbed. GaterAid was not originally designed
as a "sports drink" but as a liquid that the body absorbed faster than
pure water.

Given that the human body has a sort of sell leveling fluid system the
logical thing to do is to drink as much as possible, as often as
possible, as the body's automatic volume control will eliminate any
surplus :-)


Commenting on those two paragraphs together: My only double century was
done on a very hot summer day. The worst of it happened at about mile
130 (IIRC) when I was feeling very dehydrated, but at the same time very
uncomfortable because of a belly full of water. I could actually feel
it sloshing around in there.

It eventually occurred to me that I was hyponatremic. I ate a bunch of
salt packs from a fast food restaurant and almost immediately felt better.

So "drink as much as possible" may make sense, provided the proper
electrolyte balance is maintained. These days, if a ride's anticipated
to be long and hot, I'll sprinkle some salt substitute into my water
bottles before filling them. It's got sodium chloride, plus potassium
chloride and magnesium sulfate. The brand name is "Cardia Salt".

BTW, a good friend swears by V-8 Juice for those hot sweaty rides. I
find it works, too, and it's easy to find at remote convenience stores.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #485  
Old August 15th 16, 08:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default AG: Signs of Dehydration

On Sun, 14 Aug 2016 22:51:36 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/14/2016 9:56 PM, John B. wrote:


Your post inspired me to do a little research on "dehydration" and it
turns out that related to exercise it is a fairly complex subject.
Bicyclists apparently drink all the time while the top level
marathoners drink relatively little and typically lose 7 to 8 pounds
during a race, about 3 - 4 liters of water, or 6 to 8 bicycle bottles.


I'll have to ask the family marathoner about that.


Actually I cheated a little, it ain't all water. The top guys and a
lot of the little guys glycogen load and are carrying probably 2 kg.
extra weight, say 500 grams of glycogen, stored in the liver, and the
necessary 3 grams of water required to store each gram of glycogen, at
the start.


In addition when one begins to lose water content one doesn't
immediately become thirsty and after water is imbibed it takes as much
as 20 minutes before your body has absorbed it into the body's fluid
systems and adding complexity is that chemicals in the water determine
how quickly it will be absorbed. GaterAid was not originally designed
as a "sports drink" but as a liquid that the body absorbed faster than
pure water.

Given that the human body has a sort of sell leveling fluid system the
logical thing to do is to drink as much as possible, as often as
possible, as the body's automatic volume control will eliminate any
surplus :-)


Commenting on those two paragraphs together: My only double century was
done on a very hot summer day. The worst of it happened at about mile
130 (IIRC) when I was feeling very dehydrated, but at the same time very
uncomfortable because of a belly full of water. I could actually feel
it sloshing around in there.

It eventually occurred to me that I was hyponatremic. I ate a bunch of
salt packs from a fast food restaurant and almost immediately felt better.

So "drink as much as possible" may make sense, provided the proper
electrolyte balance is maintained. These days, if a ride's anticipated
to be long and hot, I'll sprinkle some salt substitute into my water
bottles before filling them. It's got sodium chloride, plus potassium
chloride and magnesium sulfate. The brand name is "Cardia Salt".

BTW, a good friend swears by V-8 Juice for those hot sweaty rides. I
find it works, too, and it's easy to find at remote convenience stores.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #486  
Old August 19th 16, 03:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,009
Default I ain't dead


I won't have access to my computer Saturday night, so Sunday's post
will appear on Sunday night instead of Sunday morning.

At seventy-five, if I don't notify people of changes in my routine,
they send someone to check my welfare.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #487  
Old August 19th 16, 06:32 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default I ain't dead

On Thu, 18 Aug 2016 23:20:13 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


I won't have access to my computer Saturday night, so Sunday's post
will appear on Sunday night instead of Sunday morning.

At seventy-five, if I don't notify people of changes in my routine,
they send someone to check my welfare.


Dye your hair :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #488  
Old August 21st 16, 09:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,009
Default AG: On Turning Right


In some previous post, I said:

On the way home, as I was approaching the infamous intersection of
Detroit and Pope, a driver decided to overtake me and turn right at
the same time. By good luck I had already started my turn onto Pope,
so I didn't crash into his passenger door. But he also decided that
he must aim directly for his proper position at the far-right edge of
the street. I was able to brake hard enough to stay in the part of
the triangle between him and the curb that was just barely wide enough
to contain me until he completed his pass, and he went on without the
faintest clue as to what he had done.


I've been thinking about this incident off and on, and while I still
think the driver should be sent back to driving school -- preferably
starting at age twelve -- I *could* have stopped him from doing it.

I had been thinking like a driver. In a car, when you make a right
turn, you shift as far to the right as practicable as you approach the
turn so as to get out of the way of the vehicles behind you as soon as
possible. (By undeserved good luck, this also prevents you from
right-hooking cyclists, if some ignorant unprintable hasn't used a fog
line as a lane separator for the sole purpose of confusing you.)

But when you are on a bike, shifting to the right shouts "THIS IS A
GOOD TIME TO OVERTAKE".

Or perhaps I didn't shift -- up until you get to that intersection,
the street is wide enough to share.

In any case, I should have approached the intersection in the middle
of my half of the road. *At the intersection* the lane isn't wide
enough to share, and I should have signaled that to the other drivers

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #489  
Old August 22nd 16, 01:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,471
Default AG: On Turning Right

On 8/21/2016 4:30 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

In some previous post, I said:

On the way home, as I was approaching the infamous intersection of
Detroit and Pope, a driver decided to overtake me and turn right at
the same time. By good luck I had already started my turn onto Pope,
so I didn't crash into his passenger door. But he also decided that
he must aim directly for his proper position at the far-right edge of
the street. I was able to brake hard enough to stay in the part of
the triangle between him and the curb that was just barely wide enough
to contain me until he completed his pass, and he went on without the
faintest clue as to what he had done.


I've been thinking about this incident off and on, and while I still
think the driver should be sent back to driving school -- preferably
starting at age twelve -- I *could* have stopped him from doing it.

I had been thinking like a driver. In a car, when you make a right
turn, you shift as far to the right as practicable as you approach the
turn so as to get out of the way of the vehicles behind you as soon as
possible. (By undeserved good luck, this also prevents you from
right-hooking cyclists, if some ignorant unprintable hasn't used a fog
line as a lane separator for the sole purpose of confusing you.)

But when you are on a bike, shifting to the right shouts "THIS IS A
GOOD TIME TO OVERTAKE".

Or perhaps I didn't shift -- up until you get to that intersection,
the street is wide enough to share.

In any case, I should have approached the intersection in the middle
of my half of the road. *At the intersection* the lane isn't wide
enough to share, and I should have signaled that to the other drivers


Yep. That's what I normally do. It works pretty well.



--
- Frank Krygowski
  #490  
Old August 22nd 16, 02:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,009
Default I ain't dead

On Fri, 19 Aug 2016 12:32:48 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Dye your hair :-)


That would emphasize the wrinkles and age spots.

I bleach it. So far, the bleach isn't taking.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
 




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