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Disc Rotor Refurb?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 15th 10, 10:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
(PeteCresswell)
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Posts: 2,790
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?
--
PeteCresswell
Ads
  #2  
Old January 16th 10, 08:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Chalo
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Posts: 4,943
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

PeteCresswell wrote:

A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


Scotchbrite? Wet-or-dry silicon carbide paper? Brake cleaner spray?
All of the above?

It sounds to me like your rotors have some tenacious lubricant residue
on them, and if you can remove the residue or the surface upon which
it's deposited, you'll be back in business.

Chalo


  #3  
Old January 16th 10, 08:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
thirty-six
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Posts: 10,049
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

On 15 Jan, 22:27, "(PeteCresswell)" wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


No, but if you want to degrease use washing soda or caustic soda.
Dont ever use with aluminium unless you keep the contact time short.
  #4  
Old January 16th 10, 08:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DougC
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Posts: 1,276
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

On 1/15/2010 4:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


For $50 each plus shipping, I can make them work like new.

--------

Seriously, it would be interesting to see exactly what the problem is.

To make sure they're not warped, you would need....... a machine shop.

You coat one side with dye (or just draw a grid on it with a permanent
marker) and then scoot it around gently on a granite flat, and any
"high" spots will have the marking ink rubbed off before everywhere else.
~
  #5  
Old January 16th 10, 04:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Peter Cole[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,572
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

DougC wrote:
On 1/15/2010 4:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


For $50 each plus shipping, I can make them work like new.

--------

Seriously, it would be interesting to see exactly what the problem is.

To make sure they're not warped, you would need....... a machine shop.

You coat one side with dye (or just draw a grid on it with a permanent
marker) and then scoot it around gently on a granite flat, and any
"high" spots will have the marking ink rubbed off before everywhere else.
~


The classic way to get a cheap flat surface (i.e. for lapping) is to use
some plate glass. I've checked auto heads/blocks for flatness with a
ground (e.g. Starrett) straightedge (~$10).
  #6  
Old January 16th 10, 04:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Nate Nagel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,872
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

Peter Cole wrote:
DougC wrote:
On 1/15/2010 4:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


For $50 each plus shipping, I can make them work like new.

--------

Seriously, it would be interesting to see exactly what the problem is.

To make sure they're not warped, you would need....... a machine shop.

You coat one side with dye (or just draw a grid on it with a permanent
marker) and then scoot it around gently on a granite flat, and any
"high" spots will have the marking ink rubbed off before everywhere else.
~


The classic way to get a cheap flat surface (i.e. for lapping) is to use
some plate glass. I've checked auto heads/blocks for flatness with a
ground (e.g. Starrett) straightedge (~$10).


yup, I have trued up oil pump covers using a piece of thick plate glass
and some wet/dry sandpaper (not having a milling machine in my garage.)
Ought to work for rotors as well, I'd be a little worried about the
thinness of the metal however, the rotor might actually flex while
you're sanding it, so I can't guarantee you'll get perfect results.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  #7  
Old January 16th 10, 04:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Nate Nagel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,872
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

Chalo wrote:
PeteCresswell wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.

Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.

I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.

Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


Scotchbrite? Wet-or-dry silicon carbide paper? Brake cleaner spray?
All of the above?

It sounds to me like your rotors have some tenacious lubricant residue
on them, and if you can remove the residue or the surface upon which
it's deposited, you'll be back in business.

Chalo




Brakleen or Berkebile 2+2 (carb cleaner) are great solvents when
everything else fails. I always have a can or two around even if I'm
working on something non-automotive.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  #8  
Old January 16th 10, 08:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
thirty-six
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,049
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

On 16 Jan, 16:13, Nate Nagel wrote:
Peter Cole wrote:
DougC wrote:
On 1/15/2010 4:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.


Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.


I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.


Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?


For $50 each plus shipping, I can make them work like new.


*--------


Seriously, it would be interesting to see exactly what the problem is.


To make sure they're not warped, you would need....... a machine shop.


You coat one side with dye (or just draw a grid on it with a permanent
marker) and then scoot it around gently on a granite flat, and any
"high" spots will have the marking ink rubbed off before everywhere else.
~


The classic way to get a cheap flat surface (i.e. for lapping) is to use
some plate glass. I've checked auto heads/blocks for flatness with a
ground (e.g. Starrett) straightedge (~$10).


yup, I have trued up oil pump covers using a piece of thick plate glass
and some wet/dry sandpaper (not having a milling machine in my garage.)
* Ought to work for rotors as well, I'd be a little worried about the
thinness of the metal however, the rotor might actually flex while
you're sanding it, so I can't guarantee you'll get perfect results.


On the car I've used a file applied to the disc with the engine
running to remove the overhang at the edge. For a disc still fitted a
similar method could be employed on a bicycle say using a drill chuck
applied to the tyre to turn the wheel and an abrasive pad against the
disc.
  #9  
Old January 16th 10, 08:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
z
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 761
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

thirty-six wrote:
On 16 Jan, 16:13, Nate Nagel wrote:
Peter Cole wrote:
DougC wrote:
On 1/15/2010 4:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.
Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.
I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.
Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?
For $50 each plus shipping, I can make them work like new.
--------
Seriously, it would be interesting to see exactly what the problem is.
To make sure they're not warped, you would need....... a machine shop.
You coat one side with dye (or just draw a grid on it with a permanent
marker) and then scoot it around gently on a granite flat, and any
"high" spots will have the marking ink rubbed off before everywhere else.
~
The classic way to get a cheap flat surface (i.e. for lapping) is to use
some plate glass. I've checked auto heads/blocks for flatness with a
ground (e.g. Starrett) straightedge (~$10).

yup, I have trued up oil pump covers using a piece of thick plate glass
and some wet/dry sandpaper (not having a milling machine in my garage.)
Ought to work for rotors as well, I'd be a little worried about the
thinness of the metal however, the rotor might actually flex while
you're sanding it, so I can't guarantee you'll get perfect results.


On the car I've used a file applied to the disc with the engine
running to remove the overhang at the edge. For a disc still fitted a
similar method could be employed on a bicycle say using a drill chuck
applied to the tyre to turn the wheel and an abrasive pad against the
disc.


What do you gain by filing the overhang?
  #10  
Old January 16th 10, 09:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
thirty-six
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,049
Default Disc Rotor Refurb?

On 16 Jan, 20:53, z wrote:
thirty-six wrote:
On 16 Jan, 16:13, Nate Nagel wrote:
Peter Cole wrote:
DougC wrote:
On 1/15/2010 4:27 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
A new 6" rotor is only about twenty bucks, but I've accumulated a
few rotors that *look* ok, but pulse badly.
Tried boiling in water for awhile on the latest one, but no
change.
I thought sand blasting for a moment, and then it seemed like
that would be asking for irregularities in thickness.
Anybody got a tried-and-true method of refurbishing a rotor that
doesn't require a machine shop?
For $50 each plus shipping, I can make them work like new.
*--------
Seriously, it would be interesting to see exactly what the problem is.
To make sure they're not warped, you would need....... a machine shop.
You coat one side with dye (or just draw a grid on it with a permanent
marker) and then scoot it around gently on a granite flat, and any
"high" spots will have the marking ink rubbed off before everywhere else.
~
The classic way to get a cheap flat surface (i.e. for lapping) is to use
some plate glass. I've checked auto heads/blocks for flatness with a
ground (e.g. Starrett) straightedge (~$10).
yup, I have trued up oil pump covers using a piece of thick plate glass
and some wet/dry sandpaper (not having a milling machine in my garage.)
* Ought to work for rotors as well, I'd be a little worried about the
thinness of the metal however, the rotor might actually flex while
you're sanding it, so I can't guarantee you'll get perfect results.


On the car I've used a file applied to the disc with the engine
running to remove the overhang at the edge. *For a disc still fitted a
similar method could be employed on a bicycle say using a drill chuck
applied to the tyre to turn the wheel and an abrasive pad against the
disc.


What do you gain by filing the overhang?


Absence of annoying scraping noise. This was still while the disc was
within manafuacturers limit of servicable thickness but only just. If
the disc has been re-fitted (bike) then it is possible that the pads
will run on and off an old wear track so creating unwanted braking
modulation. Although the real answer is to ensure the disc is fitted
concentrically with the wheel I cant see a little abrasion to even
things up doing any harm.
 




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