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Air horn in cold weather?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 15th 10, 02:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 827
Default Air horn in cold weather?

I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:

http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.

Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.
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  #2  
Old September 16th 10, 03:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John Thompson[_3_]
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Posts: 43
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On 2010-09-15, dgk wrote:

I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:

http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.

Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I have no direct experience with air horns, but in general lower
temperature will lower the pressure in the reservoir, which will
probably cause it to become ineffective sooner (although returning it to
a higher temperature will restore it).

The reservoir is likely metal, and the cold will not affect it. In fact,
the lower pressure in cold temperatures will put it under less stress
than it would otherwise suffer.

--

-John )
  #3  
Old September 16th 10, 01:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 827
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 21:55:19 -0500, John Thompson
wrote:

On 2010-09-15, dgk wrote:

I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:

http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.

Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I have no direct experience with air horns, but in general lower
temperature will lower the pressure in the reservoir, which will
probably cause it to become ineffective sooner (although returning it to
a higher temperature will restore it).

The reservoir is likely metal, and the cold will not affect it. In fact,
the lower pressure in cold temperatures will put it under less stress
than it would otherwise suffer.


Nope, the resevoir is a plastic bottle, likely a bit thicker than a
standard soda bottle. If it were metal I wouldn't be too concerned,
but being plastic...

Here's a better pictu

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound.../dp/B000ACAMJC

I've noted before how nice they are to lower the price to below that
eligible for free shipping.
  #4  
Old September 17th 10, 02:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
thirty-six
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,049
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On 15 Sep, 14:46, dgk wrote:
I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:

http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.

Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I expect the design has accounted for winter use, at least if it has
European origins.
  #5  
Old September 17th 10, 12:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Mike A Schwab
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 443
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On Sep 16, 7:42*am, dgk wrote:
On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 21:55:19 -0500, John Thompson



wrote:
On 2010-09-15, dgk wrote:


I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:


http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html


It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.


Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I have no direct experience with air horns, but in general lower
temperature will lower the pressure in the reservoir, which will
probably cause it to become ineffective sooner (although returning it to
a higher temperature will restore it).


The reservoir is likely metal, and the cold will not affect it. In fact,
the lower pressure in cold temperatures will put it under less stress
than it would otherwise suffer. *


Nope, the resevoir is a plastic bottle, likely a bit thicker than a
standard soda bottle. If it were metal I wouldn't be too concerned,
but being plastic...

Here's a better pictu

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound.../dp/B000ACAMJC

I've noted before how nice they are to lower the price to below that
eligible for free shipping.


On Myth Busters, the pumped up a 2 liter bottle until it exploded at
150 PSI, so I have no concerns about using regular 20/24 oz soda
bottles. The only thing I could think of is moisture forming ice in
the hose or horn. Bringing it inside should melt it before the next
trip. Perhaps a little calcium chloride in the bottle would absorb
the moisture.
  #6  
Old September 17th 10, 12:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Larry[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On Fri, 17 Sep 2010 04:29:51 -0700 (PDT), Mike A Schwab
wrote:

On Sep 16, 7:42*am, dgk wrote:
On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 21:55:19 -0500, John Thompson



wrote:
On 2010-09-15, dgk wrote:


I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:


http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html


It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.


Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I have no direct experience with air horns, but in general lower
temperature will lower the pressure in the reservoir, which will
probably cause it to become ineffective sooner (although returning it to
a higher temperature will restore it).


The reservoir is likely metal, and the cold will not affect it. In fact,
the lower pressure in cold temperatures will put it under less stress
than it would otherwise suffer. *


Nope, the resevoir is a plastic bottle, likely a bit thicker than a
standard soda bottle. If it were metal I wouldn't be too concerned,
but being plastic...

Here's a better pictu

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound.../dp/B000ACAMJC

I've noted before how nice they are to lower the price to below that
eligible for free shipping.


On Myth Busters, the pumped up a 2 liter bottle until it exploded at
150 PSI, so I have no concerns about using regular 20/24 oz soda
bottles. The only thing I could think of is moisture forming ice in
the hose or horn. Bringing it inside should melt it before the next
trip. Perhaps a little calcium chloride in the bottle would absorb
the moisture.


Why not just pump it up outside? You'll be pumping it up with dry air
and it won't lose pressure because of the cold.
  #7  
Old October 18th 10, 01:35 PM
mischastar mischastar is offline
Member
 
First recorded activity by CycleBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 59
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry[_8_] View Post
On Fri, 17 Sep 2010 04:29:51 -0700 (PDT), Mike A Schwab
wrote:

On Sep 16, 7:42*am, dgk wrote:
On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 21:55:19 -0500, John Thompson



wrote:
On 2010-09-15, dgk wrote:


I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:


http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.


Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I have no direct experience with air horns, but in general lower
temperature will lower the pressure in the reservoir, which will
probably cause it to become ineffective sooner (although returning it to
a higher temperature will restore it).


The reservoir is likely metal, and the cold will not affect it. In fact,
the lower pressure in cold temperatures will put it under less stress
than it would otherwise suffer. *


Nope, the resevoir is a plastic bottle, likely a bit thicker than a
standard soda bottle. If it were metal I wouldn't be too concerned,
but being plastic...

Here's a better pictu

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound.../dp/B000ACAMJC

I've noted before how nice they are to lower the price to below that
eligible for free shipping.


On Myth Busters, the pumped up a 2 liter bottle until it exploded at
150 PSI, so I have no concerns about using regular 20/24 oz soda
bottles. The only thing I could think of is moisture forming ice in
the hose or horn. Bringing it inside should melt it before the next
trip. Perhaps a little calcium chloride in the bottle would absorb
the moisture.


Why not just pump it up outside? You'll be pumping it up with dry air
and it won't lose pressure because of the cold.
I would think this would be fine for winter use, i had something similar myself a few years ago and used it throughout winter here in the UK.
  #8  
Old October 19th 10, 12:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Norman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 457
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On Sep 15, 9:46*am, dgk wrote:
I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:

http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.

Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I suppose that there's an off chance that a sharp blow would
shatter the bottle when fully inflated, maybe slightly more likely
in the cold, but I'd wager that they've thought this through and
are using a plastic that's somewhat less affected by temperature.
I pretty regularly keep plastic bottles of tonic water which have
been abused in the 'fridge without suffering explosions.

As to the PV=RT question: if you're pumping the chamber up
out-of-doors (as it is so quaintly put) when the example temp
is -15F to a mild 120psi, and then bringing the bicycle in, air-
horn undischarged, to a 78F building, you'll see a rise to
445:538::120:x or about 145psi.
  #9  
Old October 19th 10, 01:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 827
Default Air horn in cold weather?

On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 16:22:49 -0700 (PDT), Norman
wrote:

On Sep 15, 9:46*am, dgk wrote:
I have one of those $25 air horns - this kind of thing:

http://www.nycewheels.com/air-zound-horn.html

It is very useful for commuting, capable of easily penetrating the
headphones of joggers and such. However, I never used it in winter
before because it was too much to take off the bike when parking
outside at the office. Various lights, batteries, etc.

Now I will be able to bring the new bike into the building. So, while
I could continue to use it, I'm concerned about the effect of cold on
the bottle and its contents (air). Surely it not last as long, but
will the bottle get brittle and explode? I think it is best to not
find out the hard way.


I suppose that there's an off chance that a sharp blow would
shatter the bottle when fully inflated, maybe slightly more likely
in the cold, but I'd wager that they've thought this through and
are using a plastic that's somewhat less affected by temperature.
I pretty regularly keep plastic bottles of tonic water which have
been abused in the 'fridge without suffering explosions.

As to the PV=RT question: if you're pumping the chamber up
out-of-doors (as it is so quaintly put) when the example temp
is -15F to a mild 120psi, and then bringing the bicycle in, air-
horn undischarged, to a 78F building, you'll see a rise to
445:538::120:x or about 145psi.



It occurs to me that I've always kept the bottle in the unheated
garage when I wasn't using the horn over the winter, so I guess at
least it won't crack with the pressure, but it's a good point about
the pressure increasing when I bring it into a heated building!

The safest idea would be to fill it in the building.
 




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