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Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 28th 14, 12:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,652
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Thu, 27 Mar 2014 19:14:39 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 3/27/2014 9:14 AM, Duane wrote:



Not to **** off anyone or offend their sensibilities but once you can
understand what they are saying it really IS incomprehensible. Growing
up in a catholic family left me with very little tolerance for religion
or zealots of any stripe.


I remain amazed that anyone thinks their God (or any god) would be
comprehensible.

We don't expect our goldfish to really understand us. Why would we
expect to really understand God?


Of course it is not comprehensible, after all religions are have
nothing to do with Gods, rather they are evidence of human's beliefs
in Gods.

And probably better debated elsewhere :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
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  #12  
Old March 28th 14, 12:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,652
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Thu, 27 Mar 2014 19:14:39 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 3/27/2014 9:14 AM, Duane wrote:



Not to **** off anyone or offend their sensibilities but once you can
understand what they are saying it really IS incomprehensible. Growing
up in a catholic family left me with very little tolerance for religion
or zealots of any stripe.


I remain amazed that anyone thinks their God (or any god) would be
comprehensible.

We don't expect our goldfish to really understand us. Why would we
expect to really understand God?


Of course it is not comprehensible, after all religions are have
nothing to do with Gods, rather they are evidence of human's beliefs
in Gods.

And probably better debated elsewhere :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
  #13  
Old March 28th 14, 05:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,009
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Mon, 24 Mar 2014 10:34:11 +0700, John B.
wrote:

As an addendum to my above, don't women normally wear a hat, or other
head covering, when they enter a church? I seem to remember that it
was the practice at one time.


When I was very small, women wore hats every time they left the house.
Mom once told a story about a day so cold and windy that a
particularly-refined acquaintance gave in and wore a scarf instead of
a hat.

Scarves were for little girls. The fashions changed fast enough that
I never stopped wearing head scarves -- there is nothing warmer,
especially if you pin your scarf instead of tying it under the chin as
children did. (A good all-leather, fur-lined flight helmet is quicker
to get on and off than the equivalent warmth in scarves.)

Hats for very dressy occasions were at least permitted well into the
sixties. But it's been a long time since I owned a hat that I
wouldn't take off when under a roof.


--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #14  
Old March 28th 14, 12:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,652
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Fri, 28 Mar 2014 00:13:00 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Mon, 24 Mar 2014 10:34:11 +0700, John B.
wrote:

As an addendum to my above, don't women normally wear a hat, or other
head covering, when they enter a church? I seem to remember that it
was the practice at one time.


When I was very small, women wore hats every time they left the house.
Mom once told a story about a day so cold and windy that a
particularly-refined acquaintance gave in and wore a scarf instead of
a hat.

Scarves were for little girls. The fashions changed fast enough that
I never stopped wearing head scarves -- there is nothing warmer,
especially if you pin your scarf instead of tying it under the chin as
children did. (A good all-leather, fur-lined flight helmet is quicker
to get on and off than the equivalent warmth in scarves.)

Hats for very dressy occasions were at least permitted well into the
sixties. But it's been a long time since I owned a hat that I
wouldn't take off when under a roof.


When I was a young lad all the ladies that attended the Protestant
churches wore a hat to church. At the Catholic church it seemed to
vary a bit with which mass they attended with the early risers often
wearing a scarf. Probably all changed these days.
\
You are right, high school girls wore scarf's but when the weather
really got cold so did a lot of married women - keeps the ears warm
while you are walking down to the store :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
  #15  
Old March 28th 14, 05:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,472
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On 3/28/2014 7:36 AM, John B. wrote:

When I was a young lad all the ladies that attended the Protestant
churches wore a hat to church. At the Catholic church it seemed to
vary a bit with which mass they attended with the early risers often
wearing a scarf. Probably all changed these days.
\
You are right, high school girls wore scarf's but when the weather
really got cold so did a lot of married women - keeps the ears warm
while you are walking down to the store :-)


There's no accounting for fashion - especially for women's fashion,
which seems to change on a much shorter time scale than men's fashion.

But even men's fashion is random and unpredictable. To look only at
hats, we now have ball caps with big flat bills, perhaps worn backwards
or sideways, for the inner city crowd; unless they're modern urbanists,
whose coolness now requires a porkpie hat. There are more ordinary ball
caps for those identifying as "country"; unless they're
"country-western" in which case they'll wear a cowboy hat, despite never
associating with cows.

All of which are _so_ much more sensible than fedoras, straw boaters,
bowlers, top hats, tri-corns and whatever came before... not to mention
military ceremonial hats, gold crowns, fezzes and the like.

One of my favorite books is "Daily Life in Holland in the year 1566,"
mostly for it's wonderful illustrations by Poortvliet. As he says,
after documenting over a dozen styles of men's hats: "It really didn't
matter what you had on your head as long as you had on something."

Well, really, it probably did matter. A man's choice of hat is intended
to demonstrate his identification with a certain culture or sub-group of
society. Except, that is, for a decade or two following JFK's
inauguration, when he - followed by the Beatles - declared that to be
part of the proper group, one must NOT wear a hat.

Our desire to be part of a clan, tribe or "in group" triggers our deep
need to wear hats, no matter how weird the hat may look to those outside
the group.

And the styrofoam manufacturers are saying "Thank God!"

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #16  
Old March 29th 14, 02:04 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,652
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Fri, 28 Mar 2014 12:27:39 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 3/28/2014 7:36 AM, John B. wrote:

When I was a young lad all the ladies that attended the Protestant
churches wore a hat to church. At the Catholic church it seemed to
vary a bit with which mass they attended with the early risers often
wearing a scarf. Probably all changed these days.
\
You are right, high school girls wore scarf's but when the weather
really got cold so did a lot of married women - keeps the ears warm
while you are walking down to the store :-)


There's no accounting for fashion - especially for women's fashion,
which seems to change on a much shorter time scale than men's fashion.

But even men's fashion is random and unpredictable. To look only at
hats, we now have ball caps with big flat bills, perhaps worn backwards
or sideways, for the inner city crowd; unless they're modern urbanists,
whose coolness now requires a porkpie hat. There are more ordinary ball
caps for those identifying as "country"; unless they're
"country-western" in which case they'll wear a cowboy hat, despite never
associating with cows.

All of which are _so_ much more sensible than fedoras, straw boaters,
bowlers, top hats, tri-corns and whatever came before... not to mention
military ceremonial hats, gold crowns, fezzes and the like.

One of my favorite books is "Daily Life in Holland in the year 1566,"
mostly for it's wonderful illustrations by Poortvliet. As he says,
after documenting over a dozen styles of men's hats: "It really didn't
matter what you had on your head as long as you had on something."

Well, really, it probably did matter. A man's choice of hat is intended
to demonstrate his identification with a certain culture or sub-group of
society. Except, that is, for a decade or two following JFK's
inauguration, when he - followed by the Beatles - declared that to be
part of the proper group, one must NOT wear a hat.

Our desire to be part of a clan, tribe or "in group" triggers our deep
need to wear hats, no matter how weird the hat may look to those outside
the group.

And the styrofoam manufacturers are saying "Thank God!"


If you move to a place that is HOT you will likely find that a
substantial percentage of the people wear a "hat". But the type of
hat will be dependent on fashion, to some extent - a bloke who is
outdoors in southern Texas all day is probably going to wear a hat
that keeps the sun off, at least while working.... but he might well
have a "go to town hat" for holidays :-)

But mankind's do or die efforts to be a member of a specific group is
a whole different story. It would seem to deny the great American
effort to see everyone as equals.
--
Cheers,

John B.
  #17  
Old March 30th 14, 03:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
news13
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Posts: 28
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Mon, 24 Mar 2014 10:34:11 +0700, John B. wrote:


As an addendum to my above, don't women normally wear a hat, or other
head covering, when they enter a church? I seem to remember that it was
the practice at one time.


Yes along with white gloves.
Blokes also had to wear suit and tie.
Number dwindled, so tour church announced you could turn up in boiler
suit and numbers boomed, although the surfer got tutted by the
congregation. Then numbers dwindled again when they finally realised that
the promised kegger didn't happen until you went to heaven and a last
minute repentance would get you in anyway.

That was about four decades ago.

  #18  
Old April 10th 14, 03:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
[email protected]
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Posts: 3,346
Default Oh, thank you, helmet zealots!

On Thursday, March 27, 2014 9:13:00 PM UTC-7, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Mon, 24 Mar 2014 10:34:11 +0700,

As an addendum to my above, don't women normally wear a hat, or other
head covering, when they enter a church? I seem to remember that it
was the practice at one time.


When I was very small, women wore hats every time they left the house.
Mom once told a story about a day so cold and windy that a
particularly-refined acquaintance gave in and wore a scarf instead of
a hat.

Scarves were for little girls. The fashions changed fast enough that
I never stopped wearing head scarves -- there is nothing warmer,
especially if you pin your scarf instead of tying it under the chin as
children did. (A good all-leather, fur-lined flight helmet is quicker
to get on and off than the equivalent warmth in scarves.)

Hats for very dressy occasions were at least permitted well into the
sixties. But it's been a long time since I owned a hat that I
wouldn't take off when under a roof.

Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,


Joy you old bat. Don't try to explain to anyone the lives of Christmas past. We lived in a time where respect and self-respect was common.
 




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