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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #301  
Old September 9th 15, 11:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
NFN Smith[_2_]
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Posts: 20
Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

wrote:
In France I didn't see people passing people other than casually. I
also didn't see racers inside the city limits. That was in 2002 and
things might have changed. Stress levels seem to be a LOT higher
now.



Last time I was in Holland, I remember seeing a racing bike with a
handlebar bell.

I don't know for sure, but I'm guessing that Holland might have a law
that requires all bikes to have handlebar bells.

Smith

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  #302  
Old September 9th 15, 11:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
NFN Smith[_2_]
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Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

Duane wrote:
But likely a 44 ton truck is not going to be able to pass me in the same
lane with 1m to spare so he will be forced to move to the other lane.
Well theoretically anyway. That's what they seem to do in places where
the 1m min is in effect. At the moment here it's up to the driver to
determine what a safe passing distance is. 1 meter minimum is better
than that, I think.


Depends on the road.

Many years ago, I got blown off the road by a passing truck. I don't
remember for sure, but it may have given 2m of clearance, but certainly
not more than that.

In this particular situation, I was on a right-hand bend, the road had
minimal paved shoulder, and a double-yellow center line. Because it was
essentially a blind curve, the truck had near-zero incentive to give me
anything more than the absolute minimum space.

For me getting blown off the road, that was partly that I was really
fatigued, and it probably wouldn't have happened, if I had been in
better condition.

Smith

  #303  
Old September 10th 15, 08:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Rolf Mantel
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Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

Am 08.09.2015 um 21:05 schrieb Phil W Lee:
The difference between those types of dashed markings is advisory.
Where there is a mandatory restriction of crossing the centre line, it
will be doubled, with at least one of the lines being solid. If only
one line is solid, the restriction applies if it is the one closest to
you, and if they are both solid, you cannot cross from either side.


The 'double solid lines' is not an agreed standard of the Vienna
Concention but an optional extension. Germany uses double solid lines
only on multi-lane roads to distinguish the difference between driving
directions (where a single solid white line might be used to separate
normal lanes from turning lanes).

Also, the usage of yellow lines for edge-of-road markings is not defined
in the convention.

The solid lines first mean "no overtaking here" (where overtaking is
defined to be overtaking a moving vehicle with more than one lane of
tires, i.e. bicycles and motorbikes may be overtaken but motorbikes may
not overtake cars), secondly the mean "do not cross the solid line in
normal operation" and thirdly they mean "no parking".

So with solid lines, car may overtake bicyles but they may not crosse
the center line while overtaking (motor bikes may not legally overtake
cars even if thes stay inside the lane which is generally ignored).
Cars must stay behind moving horse-drawn carriages or agricultural
vehicles - imagine a 60 mph road going over a blind hilltop where you do
not see oncoming traffic.
With solid lines, mail trucks must not stop at mail boxes (or
contrarily, there must not be solid lines in areas where mail is
delivered by truck - parcel deliveries are known to ignore all rules of
the road on parking anyways) but if a parcel delivery stops in areas
with solid lines, you are allowed to cross the solid line with
exceptional care.
  #304  
Old September 10th 15, 03:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Duane[_3_]
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Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

On 09/09/2015 6:31 PM, NFN Smith wrote:
Duane wrote:
But likely a 44 ton truck is not going to be able to pass me in the same
lane with 1m to spare so he will be forced to move to the other lane.
Well theoretically anyway. That's what they seem to do in places where
the 1m min is in effect. At the moment here it's up to the driver to
determine what a safe passing distance is. 1 meter minimum is better
than that, I think.


Depends on the road.

Many years ago, I got blown off the road by a passing truck. I don't
remember for sure, but it may have given 2m of clearance, but certainly
not more than that.

In this particular situation, I was on a right-hand bend, the road had
minimal paved shoulder, and a double-yellow center line. Because it was
essentially a blind curve, the truck had near-zero incentive to give me
anything more than the absolute minimum space.

For me getting blown off the road, that was partly that I was really
fatigued, and it probably wouldn't have happened, if I had been in
better condition.


The "idea" here is that the truck would have had to cross the double
yellow to pass if it couldn't pass safely. We currently don't have a
minimum passing law, only the "pass safely" provision.

There are some drivers that are not going to even think about waiting to
pass until it's safe. I'm not sure what you can do about them. Even
taking the lane, they're just going to switch lanes in a blind turn.
I've had this happen with oncoming traffic and our whole group had to go
into the brush to avoid the idiot when he moved back.

I don't see how any law will prevent this from happening. But at least
with a minimum passing law, a policeman can ticket someone in violation.
I've NEVER heard of anyone getting ticketed for passing a bike too
close here.
  #305  
Old September 12th 15, 01:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default AG: Legal isn't always smart

On 9/9/2015 1:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, September 7, 2015 at 5:33:43 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/7/2015 6:31 PM, Phil W Lee wrote:
NFN Smith considered Mon, 7 Sep 2015 08:41:39
-0700 the perfect time to write:

Frank Krygowski wrote:
Good post. Just one quibble:

"... if there is a solid line, a vehicle is expected to stay in that
lane, and a vehicle should not cross a solid line. That's not only a
double yellow line, but a single white line, as well."

In Ohio, the Ohio Bicycle Federation got a law passed specifically
permitting motorists to cross a solid yellow line, when safe to do so,
in order to pass a vehicle (that includes bicycle) moving less than half
the speed limit.

It's a good law. It's what people have always done when needing to pass
a disabled vehicle creeping along the road, a mail truck stopping at
every mailbox, a horse and buggy, and a slow-moving bicycle in a lane
too narrow to share - provided the cyclist is smart enough to stay out
of the gutter.

The yellow lines are painted with the assumption that one car is trying
to pass a slightly slower one. They're unrealistically restrictive for
passing truly slow vehicles.


Good clarification. I had forgotten about scenario of temporary lane
change for overtaking, although I suspect that there's probably a
measure of variance from state to state.

And will be completely different for countries following the Vienna
conventions on road traffic (most of the world outside North America).


Can you tell us what the rules are for passing slow-moving bicycles in
those countries?
--
- Frank Krygowski


In France I didn't see people passing people other than casually. I also didn't see racers inside the city limits. That was in 2002 and things might have changed. Stress levels seem to be a LOT higher now.


We rode in France two years ago. I thought we were treated extremely
well. Never a problem, IIRC.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #306  
Old September 13th 15, 12:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Fuel stops


A serving of the jam pudding called "fruit-flavored yogurt" is a good
way to get a quick shot of sugar when you stop at a grocery store. Get
full-fat "yogurt" if at all possible, and read the label carefully to
be sure there is no non-nutritive sweetener in it.

I wrap a clear-plastic disposable spoon in a paper towel and stash it
in my tool kit; with that and my pocket knife, I'm pretty well set to
eat anything I buy along the way.

Once, when I didn't have a spoon with me, I bought a cup of yogurt and
a box of crackers, and used the crackers to dip up the yogurt.

Plain tortilla chips are also pretty good with sweet stuff, and corn
is very glycemic.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



  #307  
Old September 13th 15, 03:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Stoplights

On Mon, 7 Sep 2015 13:20:25 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

{Repost snipped]

Well, I admit that's the best description of how lights should be treated I've seen.


Thank you.



--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #308  
Old September 14th 15, 05:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Fuel stops

On Sun, 13 Sep 2015 20:37:55 +0100, Phil W Lee
wrote:

[snip]

I like fruit flapjack, and if making it myself I use honey instead of
golden syrup (although that doesn't give any nutritional benefit, it
tastes nicer).
With sugar (both the plain sort and in the form of syrup or honey),
oats. and some kind of dried fruit in the mix (banana & date is my
favourite), it makes almost a meal in a bar, and you don't need any
utensils to eat it.
You can make it by the large slab-load, cut it into whatever portion
size you like, and store it in an airtight jar or tin until needed -
It keeps extremely well.
Just carry it in a sandwich bag, either in a pocket or whatever
luggage you prefer.


I used to make a "high-calorie muffin" of equal parts of sunflower
seeds, raisins, and self-rising mixed edible powder, with mashed ripe
banana or other sweet for the wet ingredient. Eventually I figured
out how to make it into bars, which was a lot easier than dividing the
dough into eighteen muffin tins. Nowadays, between reduced range and
living in town, I count on buying food along the way, and carry Aldi's
fruit-and-grain and "protein" bars for emergencies.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #309  
Old September 15th 15, 02:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,098
Default AG: Fuel stops

On Mon, 14 Sep 2015 22:48:40 +0100, Phil W Lee
wrote:

A lot of the commercially available fruit & cereal bars are pretty
much the same as flapjacks, but at many times the cost. They are
convenient though, which I suppose is what you are paying for.


If I put food into a pannier with the serious intent of eating it,
home-made is the way to go. But when it's just-in-case, I prefer
something that can go on an indefinite number of trips before it's
eaten.

On tomorrow's trip, the first stop is a grocery, the second is a
hospital with a very good cafeteria, the third stop is behind the Wong
place, then I pass Panda express on my way to the bread outlet, the
fifth stop is a grocery store next to a line of fast-food places. I'll
probably bring my bag of food bars home again.

Plus a box of fruit-and-grain bars. I just checked, and we're out.
Plenty of "protein" bars, which we both like better. Aldi's bars are
both cheaper and better than the bars in our town's other grocery
stores, and Aldi is the object of tomorrow's tour. Goodwill etc. were
thrown in for exercise.

Alas, I'll be in Sprawlmart before four in the afternoon, but it's
about three months too late to bring a bagel sandwich home for supper.

Big Apple Bakery was thriving one day and gone the next.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #310  
Old September 15th 15, 03:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,887
Default AG: Fuel stops

On 9/14/2015 9:13 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

On tomorrow's trip, the first stop is a grocery, the second is a
hospital with a very good cafeteria...


Hospital food is often underrated. On one long tour, we rode into a
small town and asked a guy about a good place to eat supper. He
recommended the hospital cafeteria as having some of the best food in town.

It was very good indeed, and quite inexpensive. The folks in the
cafeteria seemed to think our cycling garb looked funny, but the eating
was fine.

I remember a group of teens openly snickering at us. As we left, I
walked over to them and asked them some innocuous question, and
eventually mentioned that we'd ridden over 60 miles that day. It was
funny to watch the snickering get replaced by a sort of shyness, then a
bit of respect.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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