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  #11  
Old May 24th 18, 01:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_4_]
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Default randonneur

Emanuel Berg wrote:
"
writes:

[1] https://www.fahrradmanufaktur.de/en/...andonneur-2017


Looks like a loaded touring bike to me. Those are
sold in the USA and everywhere in the world. To me
randonneur means something very special and
specific. Randonneuring is long distance cycling,
200 to 1200km, in a specific time limit. You carry
minimal gear to make it through the ride. NO ONE
uses a loaded touring bike like you linked to for
randonneuring. Look at the bikes used on Paris Brest
Paris, the original randonneur ride, and you will
not see any loaded touring bikes. The bike you
linked would be used on round the world tours
carrying four panniers, handlebar bag, and tent
piled on top of the rear rack. A heavy loaded
touring bike. If that is what you want, then just do
a simple search for loaded touring bikes.


The bike has the word "randonneur" in it's designation
which is French and translates to long distance.

The bike, if I could afford it, would be packed with
some 10-12 kg of dry bags with a Trangia, a sleeping
mat, a sleeping bag, a tent, toilet stuff, some books,
maps, and tools, and a couple of other things.

What is the difference between touring and
randonneuring? Touring is shorter? How/why would this
impact the bike? I say the bike in the URL could be
used for touring as well, and actually most everyday
biking, and why not?



Touring isn’t usually a timed event.


It is just a solid steel frame with fenders, lots of
gears, some comfort to the geometry and tires, and
racks to hang luggage onto. Unpacked, most people in
the city wouldn't notice anything special about it.


No, it’s just a touring bike like you can find anywhere. Mine was a
Bianchi Volpe purchased in a typical bike shop in Albany NY. If that’s
what you’re looking for you should have your pick.

--
duane
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  #12  
Old May 24th 18, 03:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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On 5/23/2018 4:23 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:

What is the difference between touring and
randonneuring? Touring is shorter? How/why would this
impact the bike? I say the bike in the URL could be
used for touring as well, and actually most everyday
biking, and why not?


_Bicycle Quarterly_ magazine is probably the one American magazine most
concerned with randonneuring. Here's what they said in an online article
about "10 common misconceptions about randonneuring":

Misconception #3: "You need a special bike.

"Bicycle Quarterly has done a lot of research on what makes an optimized
randonneur bike, but you can use any bike for randonneuring. One of my
friends rode several seasons, including PBP, on a carbon-fiber LeMond
(above). Another friend rode a 1980s Trek on many brevets, including a
24-hour Flèche Vélocio. You can ride any bike.

"A true randonneur bike will be a bit faster, quite a bit more
comfortable, and probably more reliable, but you don’t have to have one.
Unlike racing, where a poor bike choice will have you dropped on the
first hill, randonneuring can be done on almost any bike."

See
https://janheine.wordpress.com/2015/...randonneuring/

Bicycles are very versatile. I know the bicycling industry would like
you to have one bike for riding to the grocery in the morning, and
another one for the afternoon; one for a clockwise route, another for a
counterclockwise route.

Loaded touring bikes are among the most versatile of all bikes. I think
their only real downside is a few pounds of extra weight. If that
bothers you, go on a diet before you ride.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #13  
Old May 24th 18, 05:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
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Posts: 6,827
Default randonneur

On Wed, 23 May 2018 14:28:50 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:
I'm looking for a randonneur to buy for personal use.


pedant

FWIW, a bicycle designed for brevets and similar riding is generally
called a "randonneuse." This is the feminine form of the word; the
French words for bicycle are mostly gendered feminine.

/pedant
  #14  
Old May 24th 18, 05:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,342
Default randonneur

On 5/23/2018 1:25 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
sms writes:

[1] https://www.fahrradmanufaktur.de/en/...andonneur-2017


Yes, the Fahrradmanufaktur is probably your best bet.


Yep, I think it looks great, too expansive but I'll
put in the extra effort to maybe get it to next
summer. Or the summer after that...

We have no Randonneur bicycles available in the
U.S..


Really? Why not?


No market for them.

  #15  
Old May 24th 18, 06:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sepp Ruf
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Posts: 220
Default randonneur

jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, May 23, 2018 at 1:23:48 PM UTC-7, Emanuel Berg wrote:
" writes:

[1] https://www.fahrradmanufaktur.de/en/...andonneur-2017


I asked a dealer on the way about tires, a 42 labeled tire that's really 40
is as much as he'd try to fit under the mini-V.

Looks like a loaded touring bike to me. Those are sold in the USA and
everywhere in the world. To me randonneur means something very
special and specific. Randonneuring is long distance cycling, 200 to
1200km, in a specific time limit. You carry minimal gear to make it
through the ride. NO ONE uses a loaded touring bike like you linked
to for randonneuring. Look at the bikes used on Paris Brest Paris,
the original randonneur ride, and you will not see any loaded touring
bikes. The bike you linked would be used on round the world tours
carrying four panniers, handlebar bag, and tent piled on top of the
rear rack. A heavy loaded touring bike. If that is what you want,
then just do a simple search for loaded touring bikes.


The bike has the word "randonneur" in it's designation which is French
and translates to long distance.

The bike, if I could afford it, would be packed with some 10-12 kg of
dry bags with a Trangia, a sleeping mat, a sleeping bag, a tent, toilet
stuff, some books, maps, and tools, and a couple of other things.


Even 15 kg of gear should fit on a lighter bike.

What is the difference between touring and randonneuring? Touring is
shorter? How/why would this impact the bike? I say the bike in the URL
could be used for touring as well, and actually most everyday biking,
and why not?

It is just a solid steel frame with fenders, lots of gears, some
comfort to the geometry and tires, and racks to hang luggage onto.
Unpacked, most people in the city wouldn't notice anything special
about it.


There are zillions of worthy touring bikes. Half the Soma range fits the
bills and for complete bikes, you can get uber adventure bikes from mundane places like REI. https://tinyurl.com/yat8eze6 Or a touring bike
from Trek, Cannondale, Fuji and on and on.


I'd look for used ones sold by riders who have switched to disk brakes.

Go to Performance and get a
dopey retro Fuji touring bike.
https://www.performancebike.com/shop...e-2018-31-8654

9sp bar-end shifters will last forever, and if the frame breaks in the
middle of nowhere, the local chieftains can weld it back together because
they all have MIG kits in their huts. Even cheaper at Nashbar.
https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...ing-bike-nb-tr


Shipping to SWE:
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/se/en/fuji-touring-road-bike-2018/rp-prod166407


BTW, Ikea is recalling Sladda bikes, drive belt might *snap*. Full refund,
but no belt replacement? Lovely sustainability!
  #16  
Old May 24th 18, 07:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default randonneur

John B. writes:

I think that you are getting all tangled up in
definitions. Try the Blayley's site. I think in one
description The Fixie Pixie (the female member of
the team) describes a Brevet Bike (what you are
calling a Randonneuring Bike) as "reliable and
comfortable has enough storage capacity that you can
carry what you need for the distance and conditions
(including clothes and tools) and/or store what you
no longer need, and since the longer brevets require
lights and usually involve sustained night riding,
a bike used for longer brevets should have reliable
long-lasting lights". Which might equally well
describe a long distance touring bike :-)


I'm getting all tangled up? Because that's what
*I* said, basically

--
underground experts exiled
  #17  
Old May 24th 18, 07:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default randonneur

Duane writes:

No, it’s just a touring bike like you can find
anywhere. Mine was a Bianchi Volpe purchased in
a typical bike shop in Albany NY. If that’s what
you’re looking for you should have your pick.


I'm looking for a closed steel frame, with fenders and
reasonable big tires, comfort geometry, gears, and
bars where I can hang 4 barrels to carry
10-12 kg (total), 2 rear and 2 front.

--
underground experts exiled
  #18  
Old May 24th 18, 07:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default randonneur

Duane writes:

No, it’s just a touring bike like you can find
anywhere. Mine was a Bianchi Volpe purchased in
a typical bike shop in Albany NY. If that’s what
you’re looking for you should have your pick.


Bianchi Volpe, thanks, I'll add that to the list of
possible bikes.

--
underground experts exiled
  #19  
Old May 24th 18, 07:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default randonneur

Frank Krygowski writes:

"Bicycle Quarterly has done a lot of research on
what makes an optimized randonneur bike, but you can
use any bike for randonneuring. One of my friends
rode several seasons, including PBP, on
a carbon-fiber LeMond (above). Another friend rode
a 1980s Trek on many brevets, including a 24-hour
Flèche Vélocio.


I'd like a steel frame but thanks anyway.

--
underground experts exiled
  #20  
Old May 24th 18, 07:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default randonneur

sms writes:

We have no Randonneur bicycles available in the
U.S..


Really? Why not?


No market for them.


Depressing!

--
underground experts exiled
 




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