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MTB touring bike



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 3rd 18, 08:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,015
Default MTB touring bike

Perhaps this was approached from the wrong
angle, if one desires wide tires, perhaps one
should get a 28" MTB steel frame and only have
the gear loaded the same way?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
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  #2  
Old June 3rd 18, 09:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,723
Default MTB touring bike

On 6/3/2018 2:39 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Perhaps this was approached from the wrong
angle, if one desires wide tires, perhaps one
should get a 28" MTB steel frame and only have
the gear loaded the same way?


Like Mr Seaton, IFTFY.

should get a 28" MTB steel frame


WTF does that mean, if anything?

635mm format is, in my experience 1-1/2x1/5/8 only. Nothing
wider, nothing skinnier available anywhere.

Yes, you can buy a classic British 28" bike:
http://www.mbzponton.org/n2awa/ralei...007c_small.jpg

and you can call it a randonneur or call it any name you
like but that won't change the real world.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #3  
Old June 3rd 18, 10:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,056
Default MTB touring bike

On Sunday, June 3, 2018 at 4:22:55 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
On 6/3/2018 2:39 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Perhaps this was approached from the wrong
angle, if one desires wide tires, perhaps one
should get a 28" MTB steel frame and only have
the gear loaded the same way?


Like Mr Seaton, IFTFY.

should get a 28" MTB steel frame


WTF does that mean, if anything?

635mm format is, in my experience 1-1/2x1/5/8 only. Nothing
wider, nothing skinnier available anywhere.

Yes, you can buy a classic British 28" bike:
http://www.mbzponton.org/n2awa/ralei...007c_small.jpg

and you can call it a randonneur or call it any name you
like but that won't change the real world.


My antivirus warns me away from that site.

- Frank Krygowski

  #4  
Old June 3rd 18, 11:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,723
Default MTB touring bike

On 6/3/2018 4:41 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Sunday, June 3, 2018 at 4:22:55 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
On 6/3/2018 2:39 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Perhaps this was approached from the wrong
angle, if one desires wide tires, perhaps one
should get a 28" MTB steel frame and only have
the gear loaded the same way?


Like Mr Seaton, IFTFY.

should get a 28" MTB steel frame


WTF does that mean, if anything?

635mm format is, in my experience 1-1/2x1/5/8 only. Nothing
wider, nothing skinnier available anywhere.

Yes, you can buy a classic British 28" bike:
http://www.mbzponton.org/n2awa/ralei...007c_small.jpg

and you can call it a randonneur or call it any name you
like but that won't change the real world.


My antivirus warns me away from that site.

- Frank Krygowski


It's a JPEG of a 1950 Raleigh DL-1 Roadster. I'm sure you've
seen them before as have we all.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #5  
Old June 4th 18, 03:02 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,875
Default MTB touring bike

On Sun, 03 Jun 2018 17:51:39 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 6/3/2018 4:41 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Sunday, June 3, 2018 at 4:22:55 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
On 6/3/2018 2:39 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Perhaps this was approached from the wrong
angle, if one desires wide tires, perhaps one
should get a 28" MTB steel frame and only have
the gear loaded the same way?


Like Mr Seaton, IFTFY.

should get a 28" MTB steel frame

WTF does that mean, if anything?

635mm format is, in my experience 1-1/2x1/5/8 only. Nothing
wider, nothing skinnier available anywhere.

Yes, you can buy a classic British 28" bike:
http://www.mbzponton.org/n2awa/ralei...007c_small.jpg

and you can call it a randonneur or call it any name you
like but that won't change the real world.


My antivirus warns me away from that site.

- Frank Krygowski


It's a JPEG of a 1950 Raleigh DL-1 Roadster. I'm sure you've
seen them before as have we all.


I get the same antivirus warning. This is easier:
https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=1950+Raleigh+DL-1+Roadster

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #6  
Old June 4th 18, 10:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
somebody[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 193
Default MTB touring bike

On Sun, 03 Jun 2018 21:39:54 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Perhaps this was approached from the wrong
angle, if one desires wide tires, perhaps one
should get a 28" MTB steel frame and only have
the gear loaded the same way?


I use a MTB with smooth tires (Schwalbe Marathon+) for the daily work
commute. It might be semi-OK for touring with drop bars installed.
Downsides:
- Short chainstay. My heels almost hit the rear panniers. And the
chainline is no good.
- Suspension front fork. Heavy and one more thing to fail. No
braze-on's for a front rack.

But it's good for the commute where those things are of little
concern.
  #7  
Old June 4th 18, 12:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,015
Default MTB touring bike

AMuzi wrote:

should get a 28" MTB steel frame


WTF does that mean, if anything?


I've read there are even 29" MTBs in the US,
forgot the brand tho. I read the cycling press
in the public library cover to cover (well, the
parts on technology at least) but I don't
subscribe so I can't look it up either. It was
mentioned a couple of months ago. (Perhaps
there are 29" MTBs in other countries as well.)

Speaking of MTBs and the US, I also read that
the original MTB was simply a single-speed with
a coaster brake and wide tires. On my military
steel bike, which has a Torpedo 1SP rear hub,
I have these tires


front 56-584 27.5 x 2.20 650-56B
rear 26 x 1-1/2 x 2


So I suppose I have an original "US MTB", only
with a Swedish frame, and a German hub!

But obviously the bike wouldn't do in anything
that resembles a "mountain". Too heavy and no
gears: even too heavy for any puny inclination
in the wild or city alike!

635mm format is, in my experience 1-1/2x1/5/8
only. Nothing wider, nothing skinnier
available anywhere.


635, isn't the modern 28" 622? Well, I have the
following data on 635 [1].


635 700B B = 2nd revision
44-635 28 x 1-5/8 x 1-1/2 old-school "V rim"
40-635 28 x 1-1/2 700x38B


The "V rim" is my personal designation where
the rim has the shape of the letter V and all
the spoke holes are on a single line (not
left/right interchangeably like one is used to).
I don't know if this makes the wheel less
strong and more difficult to true?

Yes, you can buy a classic British 28" bike:
http://www.mbzponton.org/n2awa/ralei...007c_small.jpg


Save for the color (black), that looks great!
But doesn't that have the save problems as my
military bike? No gears and too heavy?

A classic British 28", is that this BTW


642 28 x 1-3/8 700A US and UK utility bikes


?


[1] http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/bike/TIRE

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #8  
Old June 6th 18, 03:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
bob prohaska
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 47
Default MTB touring bike

Emanuel Berg wrote:

Save for the color (black), that looks great!
But doesn't that have the save problems as my
military bike? No gears and too heavy?


Are you looking for something like this? WWWWide tires, and gears.

https://heavy.com/tech/2017/03/top-b...tain-mongoose/

I've seen a couple of them locally, so they're not vaporware.

bob prohaska

  #9  
Old June 6th 18, 09:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,015
Default MTB touring bike

bob prohaska wrote:

Save for the color (black), that looks
great! But doesn't that have the save
problems as my military bike? No gears and
too heavy?


Are you looking for something like this?
WWWWide tires, and gears.

https://heavy.com/tech/2017/03/top-b...tain-mongoose/

I've seen a couple of them locally, so
they're not vaporware.


I have seen a couple of them as well. They seem
to be fun, not the least to ride in snow,
perhaps for touring just a bit too wide
tires tho

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #10  
Old June 7th 18, 03:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,349
Default MTB touring bike

On Monday, June 4, 2018 at 6:55:45 AM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
AMuzi wrote:

should get a 28" MTB steel frame


WTF does that mean, if anything?


I've read there are even 29" MTBs in the US,
forgot the brand tho. I read the cycling press
in the public library cover to cover (well, the
parts on technology at least) but I don't
subscribe so I can't look it up either. It was
mentioned a couple of months ago. (Perhaps
there are 29" MTBs in other countries as well.)


In the USA almost every mountain bike sold today is 29". 26" mountain bikes are hardly sold except maybe at WalMart. 29" is simply a 700C bicycle rim with a 1.9" or 2.1" tire on it. Measures about 29" diameter. 700C road wheels with 23mm or 25mm tires measure about 26.5" But calling your bike a 26.5" isn't very popular in the USA I guess. But saying you have a MANLY 29 INCH mountain bike is macho I guess. Saying you have a 700C mountain bike rim with 2.1" tires isn't too appealing I guess.




Speaking of MTBs and the US, I also read that
the original MTB was simply a single-speed with
a coaster brake and wide tires. On my military
steel bike, which has a Torpedo 1SP rear hub,
I have these tires


front 56-584 27.5 x 2.20 650-56B
rear 26 x 1-1/2 x 2


So I suppose I have an original "US MTB", only
with a Swedish frame, and a German hub!

But obviously the bike wouldn't do in anything
that resembles a "mountain". Too heavy and no
gears: even too heavy for any puny inclination
in the wild or city alike!

635mm format is, in my experience 1-1/2x1/5/8
only. Nothing wider, nothing skinnier
available anywhere.


635, isn't the modern 28" 622? Well, I have the
following data on 635 [1].


635 700B B = 2nd revision
44-635 28 x 1-5/8 x 1-1/2 old-school "V rim"
40-635 28 x 1-1/2 700x38B


The "V rim" is my personal designation where
the rim has the shape of the letter V and all
the spoke holes are on a single line (not
left/right interchangeably like one is used to).
I don't know if this makes the wheel less
strong and more difficult to true?

Yes, you can buy a classic British 28" bike:
http://www.mbzponton.org/n2awa/ralei...007c_small.jpg


Save for the color (black), that looks great!
But doesn't that have the save problems as my
military bike? No gears and too heavy?

A classic British 28", is that this BTW


642 28 x 1-3/8 700A US and UK utility bikes


?


[1] http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/bike/TIRE

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


 




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