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Hex Wrenches



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 7th 18, 08:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 9,444
Default Hex Wrenches

On 6/7/2018 1:47 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Emanuel Berg wrote:
avid Scheidt wrote:

: I've also got assorted bits for interchangle
: bit screwdrivers, and sockets, which find
: a use on bikes once in a while.

:No kidding, perhaps more common on my bikes
:than your road bikes and MTBs. The common small
:bolt heads and nuts are almost always 9mm or

I actually meant 'sockets with a hex bit in them', like these
https://store.snapon.com/Hex-Standar...t-P630933.aspx
since we're tlking about hex wrenches. (I have the sort you're
talking about, as well as a collection of wrenches. many sorts.)


:What's the difference between the Wera Hex-Plus
:and Bondhus ball end? Bondhus is great,
bviously. I have no experience with the Wera
:range but I have walked by it countless of
:times in the accursed hardware store...

the hex plus isn't hex shaped. it has the corners cut off (it's more
complicated than taht, but that's a first approximation), so that
the force is applied away from the cornders of the fastener hex.
That's not a bad idea, it's universal in box end wrench designs. I
haven't found it to be a problem with hex socket cap screws, though.
At least when using the right bit, because there isn't enough
clearance for the tool to rotate in the hole.


Right I agree. Much like SnapOn Flank Drive except inside out.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


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  #12  
Old June 7th 18, 09:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,137
Default Hex Wrenches

On 2018-06-07 09:01, jbeattie wrote:
After all these decades, I have no fancy hex wrenches -- nothing with
a t-handle. Fanciest is a pedal wrench and a Park three-way. Are the
Park T-handle wrenches worth it versus the standard long wrenches,
e.g.
https://www.westernbikeworks.com/pro...hex-wrench-set
I'm also a little leery of the ball end fit.


I was never much of a fan of the ball-ends. I do not have T-handle
wrenches but pretty much all others and my favorite ones are the hex
"socket-style" inserts. They can be clicked into a screwdriver-style
handle, a T-handle driver if you must, a ratchet wrench and best of all,
into my Ryobi power driver and the impact driver (for really tough
jobs). They fit neatly into one small pouch, saving space in the tool
box when things must be carried.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #13  
Old June 8th 18, 01:04 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,767
Default Hex Wrenches

On Thu, 7 Jun 2018 19:25:53 +0000 (UTC), David Scheidt
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
:On Thu, 7 Jun 2018 17:53:42 +0000 (UTC), David Scheidt
wrote:

:I fail to understand the love for Wera drivers. They're really
:expensive for Chinese made tools, and not any nicer than what Bondhus
:sell.

:Wera tools are made in Czech Republic:
:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wera_Tools

Pull the other one. It's got bells on. They're assembled in CZ, what
that actually means isn't transparent, given the EUs horrible COO
regulations. (EU regulations let you put a "made in EU country"
sticker on something for export, even if the only operation done in
the EU was taking it out of a bulk box, putting the made in country
sticker on it, and putting it in an idividual box.. That's
improvement. Until recently you could claim "made in foo" if the
product had been to foo. A few countries had stronger rules.)
My educated suspicion is that the driver
blades come from the factories in China that Wera make bits in.
Handles are probaly czech.


Your comments about the EU might be true. I have no way of knowing
from here as I don't deal with any EU companies directly. I find it
strange that the EU beaurocracy, that micromanages every minute detail
of product manufacture from conception to recycling, would be so loose
on their labeling requirements. Is there a reason why the EU would
want or tolerate such deceptive labeling?[1]

You might want to reconsider after you watch this video:
"Production of Wera tools in the Czech Republic."
(translated from the original Polish):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8h7ELeEFIk (6:32)
The factory and workers are obviously doing more than assembling
handles and seem to not be in China. Some of the machines in the
video were cold heading and hot forging various hex head angle
wrenches.


[1] In the distant past, one of my marine radio products failed type
acceptance testing in France and England specifically because the
"Made in USA" label failed to include the periods in the U.S.A. It
also failed in France because the light dimmer dimmed to extinction,
as was required in other countries.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #14  
Old June 8th 18, 01:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,767
Default Hex Wrenches

On Thu, 07 Jun 2018 14:32:40 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 6/7/2018 12:53 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
I fail to understand the love for Wera drivers. They're really
expensive for Chinese made tools, and not any nicer than what Bondhus
sell.


We're also happy with Wiha allen products:
https://www.wihatools.com/hex-tools/ball-end-hex
some of which are very old and have been re faced many times.


Please note that Wiha and Wera are two different companies.
Both are German companies.

"Wiha vs Wera Hex L-Key Holding Feature Comparison"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnrDQy080Zs

My comments and preferences are for the Wiha products (even though I
screwed up and provided a link to a Wera factory tour).

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #15  
Old June 8th 18, 01:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,444
Default Hex Wrenches

On 6/7/2018 7:04 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Thu, 7 Jun 2018 19:25:53 +0000 (UTC), David Scheidt
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
:On Thu, 7 Jun 2018 17:53:42 +0000 (UTC), David Scheidt
wrote:

:I fail to understand the love for Wera drivers. They're really
:expensive for Chinese made tools, and not any nicer than what Bondhus
:sell.

:Wera tools are made in Czech Republic:
:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wera_Tools

Pull the other one. It's got bells on. They're assembled in CZ, what
that actually means isn't transparent, given the EUs horrible COO
regulations. (EU regulations let you put a "made in EU country"
sticker on something for export, even if the only operation done in
the EU was taking it out of a bulk box, putting the made in country
sticker on it, and putting it in an idividual box.. That's
improvement. Until recently you could claim "made in foo" if the
product had been to foo. A few countries had stronger rules.)
My educated suspicion is that the driver
blades come from the factories in China that Wera make bits in.
Handles are probaly czech.


Your comments about the EU might be true. I have no way of knowing
from here as I don't deal with any EU companies directly. I find it
strange that the EU beaurocracy, that micromanages every minute detail
of product manufacture from conception to recycling, would be so loose
on their labeling requirements. Is there a reason why the EU would
want or tolerate such deceptive labeling?[1]

You might want to reconsider after you watch this video:
"Production of Wera tools in the Czech Republic."
(translated from the original Polish):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8h7ELeEFIk (6:32)
The factory and workers are obviously doing more than assembling
handles and seem to not be in China. Some of the machines in the
video were cold heading and hot forging various hex head angle
wrenches.


[1] In the distant past, one of my marine radio products failed type
acceptance testing in France and England specifically because the
"Made in USA" label failed to include the periods in the U.S.A. It
also failed in France because the light dimmer dimmed to extinction,
as was required in other countries.



I don't know about Wera tools.

But the EU regulatory racket is a racket.

Chinese crap in a French box is French. Reggio Parmesan or
Asiago made in Wisconsin is a danger to humanity. New York
Feta is not allowed, and so on.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #16  
Old June 8th 18, 01:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,767
Default Hex Wrenches

On Thu, 07 Jun 2018 17:04:01 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

You might want to reconsider after you watch this video:
"Production of Wera tools in the Czech Republic."
(translated from the original Polish):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8h7ELeEFIk (6:32)
The factory and workers are obviously doing more than assembling
handles and seem to not be in China. Some of the machines in the
video were cold heading and hot forging various hex head angle
wrenches.


Oops. I screwed up. That's the Wera factory in the Czech Republic,
and not one of the Wiha factories:
https://www.wihatools.com/about-wiha-tools



--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #17  
Old June 8th 18, 02:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,233
Default Hex Wrenches

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

:Your comments about the EU might be true. I have no way of knowing
:from here as I don't deal with any EU companies directly. I find it
:strange that the EU beaurocracy, that micromanages every minute detail
f product manufacture from conception to recycling, would be so loose
n their labeling requirements. Is there a reason why the EU would
:want or tolerate such deceptive labeling?[1]

Because it's good for business, particularly for the export market,
and it lets historically european manufacturers import **** from china
and pretend they made it locally. (There were no EU laws mandating
COO statements on goods sold in the EU until 2014, and in some cases
they were strictly prohibited.)
A garment "Made in Italy" is more valuable than one "Made in China,
with tags sewn on in Italy". US labeling rules are less strict for
the export market, too. Many things sold in the US which have to say
"Made in the US of imported materials" or the like when sold here can
be straight up "Made in USA" when sold abroad.


--
sig 110
  #18  
Old June 8th 18, 02:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,444
Default Hex Wrenches

On 6/7/2018 8:30 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

:Your comments about the EU might be true. I have no way of knowing
:from here as I don't deal with any EU companies directly. I find it
:strange that the EU beaurocracy, that micromanages every minute detail
f product manufacture from conception to recycling, would be so loose
n their labeling requirements. Is there a reason why the EU would
:want or tolerate such deceptive labeling?[1]

Because it's good for business, particularly for the export market,
and it lets historically european manufacturers import **** from china
and pretend they made it locally. (There were no EU laws mandating
COO statements on goods sold in the EU until 2014, and in some cases
they were strictly prohibited.)
A garment "Made in Italy" is more valuable than one "Made in China,
with tags sewn on in Italy". US labeling rules are less strict for
the export market, too. Many things sold in the US which have to say
"Made in the US of imported materials" or the like when sold here can
be straight up "Made in USA" when sold abroad.



In our industry, bicycles are proudly "Designed in USA" with
a big f**king flag logo, meaning, "We carefully reviewed the
bids and chose the low bidder".

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #20  
Old June 8th 18, 01:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,444
Default Hex Wrenches

On 6/7/2018 9:48 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, June 7, 2018 at 1:59:19 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Maybe because I have
used their jewelers screwdriver sets without destroying as many
Philips screw heads as I did in the past using Craftsman screwdrivers.

Jeff Liebermann


How can you destroy screw heads with jewelers screwdrivers? You are talking about real little tiny screwdrivers that only work on really little tiny screws. NO force at all is required to turn tiny little screwdrivers on tiny little screws. You can't destroy the screw head unless you are a total incompetent ---. I have a set of tiny jewelers screwdrivers in a plastic case I probably bought at the dollar store or maybe Harbor Freight. Worked perfectly for decades now on the tiny screws I use them on.

Your comparison of jewelers screwdrivers is about the same as comparing which rock can you bash someone's head in best. Hard granite, or soft limestone. Doesn't really matter which you use. Both are more than capable of smashing someone's head. The shi--iest jewelers screwdriver ever made is still capable of turning the little tiny screws. Because they are little tiny screws.


Well, in a perfect world, yes.

Like Jeff I have mangled them, notably the 1.2mm size
knocking stuck Shimano gear wires out of Campagnolo shift
levers and such.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


 




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